CORDIS
EU research results

CORDIS

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Entrainment of the circadian clock

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 18741

  • Start date

    1 January 2006

  • End date

    30 June 2011

Funded under:

FP6-LIFESCIHEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 15 874 295

  • EU contribution

    € 12 299 389

Coordinated by:

LUDWIG-MAXIMILIANS-UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN

Germany

Objective

The circadian clock is a basic biological process that enables organisms to anticipate daily environmental changes by adjusting behavior, physiology and gene regulation. It impacts health and quality of life in regulating sleep and well-being, in the consequences of shift-work, in medical diagnosis/therapy, and in age-related changes.

A critical feature of the clock is its synchronization to the external day (entrainment). Entrainment is the key to understanding the circadian clock and its control mechanisms. In EUCLOCK, highly competitive European researchers join forces to investigate the circadian clock under entrainment using the most advanced methods of functional genomics and phenomics comparing powerful genetic model organisms (humans, mice, flies, and yeast).

Its four major innovations will shape the future of circadian research:
- To compare genomic and phenomic aspects of the clock, SOPs will be developed for the first time that mimic aspects of the natural day (dawn/dusk, day-lengths, etc).
- Protocols, devices and algorithms will be developed, enabling for the first time large-scale, non-invasive research on human entrainment in the field.
- Developing the first animal models for shift-work, making animals 'work' and feed out of phase with their natural rhythms. The ensuing "dys-entrainment" will be investigated at all levels, aiming to provide the insights needed to treat the symptoms and consequences of human shift-work.
- Building on genome sequences, new genetic components and interactions will be identified that control the circadian clock and its entrainment.

For the first time the experimental advantages of yeast will be extensively used. The tractability of yeast permits integration and reconstruction of elements and interactions gleaned from other systems. Together, these approaches allow systems biology research on circadian timing to be performed and integrated at the level of the genome, the proteome, and the metabolome.

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Coordinator

LUDWIG-MAXIMILIANS-UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN

Address

Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1
Munich

Germany

Participants (28)

UNIVERSITY OF FRIBOURG

Switzerland

RIJKSUNIVERSITEIT GRONINGEN

Netherlands

UNIVERSITY OF REGENSBURG

Germany

THE CHANCELLOR, MASTER AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

United Kingdom

CHARITÉ UNIVERSITÄTSMEDIZIN BERLIN

Germany

UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER

United Kingdom

LEIDEN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER

Netherlands

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN GERMAN RESERACH CENTER FOR ENVIROMENTAL HEALTH (GMBH), FORMER: GSF-FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM FÜR UMWELT UND GESUNDHEIT

Germany

ESTONIAN BIOCENTRE

Estonia

UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

United Kingdom

BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER

Hungary

MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

United Kingdom

CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE

France

THE UNIVERSITY OF SURREY

United Kingdom

INSTITUTE OF PHYSIOLOGY, THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC

Czechia

ERASMUS MC

Netherlands

UNIVERSITÄT BASEL

Switzerland

INSTITUTE OF INTERNAL MEDICINE SB RAMS

Russia

LUX INNOVATE LTD., FORMER: LUX BIOTECHNOLOGY LTD

United Kingdom

GABRIELE HÖNIG

Germany

NEWBEHAVIOR AG

Switzerland

PERSONAL HEALTH INSTITUTE INTERNATIONAL VOF

Netherlands

SOWOON TECHNOLOGIES SÀRL

Switzerland

BÜHLMANN LABORATORIES AG

Switzerland

QUEEN MARY & WESTFIELD COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

United Kingdom

INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA SANTE ET DE LA RECHERCHE MEDICALE

France

UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA

Italy

UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE

Switzerland

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 18741

  • Start date

    1 January 2006

  • End date

    30 June 2011

Funded under:

FP6-LIFESCIHEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 15 874 295

  • EU contribution

    € 12 299 389

Coordinated by:

LUDWIG-MAXIMILIANS-UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN

Germany