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Unravelling the molecular basis of common complex human disorders using the dog as a model system

Unravelling the molecular basis of common complex human disorders using the dog as a model system

Objective

Despite major efforts, identifying susceptibility genes for common human diseases - cancer, cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurological disorders - is difficult due to the complexity of the underlying causes. The dog population is composed of ~ 400 purebred breeds; each one is a genetic isolate with unique characteristics resulting from persistent selection for desired attributes or from genetic drift / inbreeding. Dogs tend to suffer from the same range of diseases than human but the genetic complexity of these diseases within a breed is reduced as a consequence of the genetic drift and – due to long-range linkage disequilibrium – the number of SNP markers needed to perform whole genome scans is divided by at least ten. Here, we propose a European effort gathering experts in genomics to take advantage of this extraordinary genetic model. Veterinary clinics from 12 European countries will collect DNA samples from large cohorts of dogs suffering from a range of thoroughly defined diseases of relevance to human health. Once these different cohorts will be built, DNA samples will be sent to a centralized, high-throughput SNP genotyping facility. The SNP genotypes will be stored in central database and made available to participating collaborating centres, who will analyze the data with the support of dedicated statistical genetics platforms. Following genome wide association and fine-mapping candidate genes will be followed up at the molecular level by expert animal and human genomics centers. This innovative approach using the dog model will ultimately provide insights into the pathogenesis of common human diseases – its primary goal.

Coordinator

UNIVERSITE DE LIEGE

Address

Place Du 20 Aout 7
4000 Liege

Belgium

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 1 270 598

Administrative Contact

Marilou Ramos Pamplona (Dr.)

Participants (22)

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NORGES VETERNINAERHOGSKOLE

Norway

UPPSALA UNIVERSITET

Sweden

EU Contribution

€ 1 170 000

SVERIGES LANTBRUKSUNIVERSITET

Sweden

EU Contribution

€ 719 000

THE UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 751 200

HELSINGIN YLIOPISTO

Finland

EU Contribution

€ 855 000

KOBENHAVNS UNIVERSITET

Denmark

EU Contribution

€ 689 400

ANIMAL HEALTH TRUST

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 684 500

NORGES MILJO-OG BIOVITENSKAPLIGE UNIVERSITET

Norway

EU Contribution

€ 518 000

UNIVERSITEIT UTRECHT

Netherlands

EU Contribution

€ 504 096

UNIVERSITAET BERN

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 359 400

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 349 400

CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS

France

EU Contribution

€ 422 400

ANTAGENE

France

EU Contribution

€ 330 000

ECOLE NATIONALE VETERINAIRE D'ALFORT

France

EU Contribution

€ 230 000

THE ROYAL VETERINARY COLLEGE

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 220 000

UNIVERSITAT AUTONOMA DE BARCELONA

Spain

EU Contribution

€ 150 000

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE DUBLIN, NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, DUBLIN

Ireland

EU Contribution

€ 150 000

THE UNIVERSITY OF LIVERPOOL

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 115 000

UNIVERSITAT ZURICH

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 70 000

LUDWIG-MAXIMILIANS-UNIVERSITAET MUENCHEN

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 75 000

THE UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 93 000

COMMISSARIAT A L ENERGIE ATOMIQUE ET AUX ENERGIES ALTERNATIVES

France

EU Contribution

€ 2 272 000

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 201370

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 January 2008

  • End date

    30 June 2012

Funded under:

FP7-HEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 15 677 376,24

  • EU contribution

    € 11 997 994

Coordinated by:

UNIVERSITE DE LIEGE

Belgium