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Promotion of plasticity as a treatment for neurodegenerative conditions

Promotion of plasticity as a treatment for neurodegenerative conditions

Objective

Neurodegenerative diseases all cause damage to the circuitry of the nervous system, with loss of connections, axons and neurons. The loss can be gradual, as in Alzheimer’s disease, rapid as in stroke, or intermediate as in the delayed neuronal loss after stroke. Following damage, the nervous system is able partially to compensate through the formation of alternative connections and pathways, a process known as plasticity. Adults are therefore able to regain considerable function after stroke, and to compensate for the synapse and cell loss of Alzheimer’s disease until it reaches a critical level. Children undergo a period of enhanced plasticity in most parts of the CNS at the end of development, known as critical periods. During these periods their ability to compensate for damage to the CNS is in many cases much greater than in adults. The overall concept behind this application is that restoration of the function in neurodegeneration can be achieved through plasticity (the formation of new functional connections, withdrawal of inappropriate connections, modulation of synaptic strength). Promoting increased plasticity in selected parts of the adult nervous system back to the level seen in children is a powerful method of enhancing recovery of function in animal models. Plasticity-promoting treatments could therefore be beneficial in a wide range of conditions that damage the CNS. The PLASTICISE project integrates scientists from four scientific areas 1) Development of methods to promote plasticity 2) Development of models of neurodegenerative disease 3) Imaging of plasticity at the macro and micro level 4) Study of recovery of function through plasticity in human patients with brain disorders. The concept that unites the partners is the belief that treatments that enhance plasticity will become one of key medications that will improve neurological function in the damaged human nervous system. The purpose of the project is to bring this moment closer.
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Coordinator

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

Address

Trinity Lane The Old Schools
Cb2 1tn Cambridge

United Kingdom

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 871 931,92

Administrative Contact

Renata Schaeffer (Ms.)

Participants (15)

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UNIVERSITAT ZURICH

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 694 760

CONSIGLIO NAZIONALE DELLE RICERCHE

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 338 360

KONINKLIJKE NEDERLANDSE AKADEMIE VAN WETENSCHAPPEN - KNAW

Netherlands

EU Contribution

€ 301 130

Novartis Forschungsstiftung

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 338 930

ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE FEDERALE DE LAUSANNE

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 338 930

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 641 060

UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 338 930

UNIVERSITAETSKLINIKUM FREIBURG

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 351 280

INSTYTUT BIOLOGII DOSWIADCZALNEJ IM. M. NENCKIEGO POLSKIEJ AKADEMII NAUK

Poland

EU Contribution

€ 330 338

MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 351 440

PHARMAXON SAS

France

EU Contribution

€ 53 655,08

D-Pharm LTD

Israel

EU Contribution

€ 14 400

DANDO WEISS & COLUCCI LIMITED

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 229 500

NOVARTIS PHARMA AG

Switzerland

EU Contribution

€ 2 400

GLAXOSMITHKLINE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LTD.

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 2 400

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 223524

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 December 2008

  • End date

    30 November 2012

Funded under:

FP7-HEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 6 767 728,31

  • EU contribution

    € 5 199 445

Coordinated by:

THE CHANCELLOR MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

United Kingdom

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