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FP7

CASI Report Summary

Project ID: 612113
Funded under: FP7-SIS
Country: Bulgaria

Periodic Report Summary 2 - CASI (Public Participation in Developing a Common Framework for Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation)

Project Context and Objectives:
The second periodic report covers the period starting on July 1st 2015 until December 31st 2016 (18 months). The “Public Participation in Developing a Common Framework for Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation”, or CASI, is an FP7-supported 42-month project, representing a collaboration among 19 partners from 12 EU countries. The Consortium is supported by a network of country experts (correspondents) in the remaining 16 EU countries, thus ensuring complete coverage of the EU Member States. CASI is coordinated by project partner Applied Research and Communications Fund (ARC Fund), an independent private research organisation based in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Introduction to CASI
CASI is proposed as a response to one of the Societal Challenges set out in the Horizon 2020 programme of the European Union, namely “Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials”. It represents an EU-wide cross-sectoral partnership on innovation-related challenges and considers not only the impacts of social and technological innovation, but also the types of actors involved and their inherent interests. It thus effectively integrates the perspectives of civil society, SMEs, industry, policy stakeholders, and leading academics.
This collaboration investigates the scope of sustainable innovation as a societal phenomenon and enables the elaboration of an assessment framework of sustainable innovation practices, whose application can be successfully integrated into public policy developments.
CASI is based on the understanding of innovation as a key driver of societal progress in the age of technology and of imminent uncertainties about the future. Sustainable innovation, on the other hand, further enhances this understanding by introducing sustainability as a focal core of the innovation process. At the same time, this is not an attempt to introduce yet another distinctive type of innovation. Rather, CASI fosters debate on conceptual dimensions, policy boundaries, and good practices combining innovative pursuits with sustainability objectives.

The overall objective of the CASI project (“Public Participation in the Development of a Common Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation”) is ‘to develop a methodological framework for assessing and managing sustainable innovation through wider public engagement in the RTDI system by ensuring the commitment of a broad spectrum of societal stakeholders, including industry, research organisations, policy-makers, academia and science institutes, civil society organisations, media and the general public’.

CASI Specific Objectives:
Specific Objective 1: Development of a working definition of sustainable innovation, building on the most common definitions, academic literature as well as expert advice both from within and outside of the project consortium.
Specific Objective 2: The inclusion of general public concerns in assessing the social impact of sustainable innovation on society. Issues such as participation in the development of innovation, inclusiveness, ethics, gender and open access are considered in these sessions.
Specific Objective 3: Development of a common understanding of best practices in sustainable innovation management.
Specific Objective 4: Development of a framework for assessment and management of sustainable innovation.
Specific Objective 5: Development of specific policy recommendations on how to improve innovation management and how sustainability considerations can be incorporated into it based on the findings of the assessment framework and public consultations.

Project Results:
Specific Objective 1: Development of a working definition of sustainable innovation, building on the most common definitions, academic literature as well as expert advice both from within and outside of the project consortium.
➢ This specific objective was fully attained during the second reporting period. A definition has been proposed, alongside a theoretical framework for sustainable innovation, and published as deliverables D2.1 “State-of-the-art in research and innovation: Climate action, environment, resource efficiency and raw materials”, and D2.2 “Sustainable innovation conceptual framework”. These deliverables also integrated findings from the online survey conducted with innovation and sustainability experts across the EU. The survey results further proved that public participation is seen as a critical part of sustainable innovation, in addition to the interplay among social, economic and environmental considerations.
Specific Objective 2: The inclusion of general public concerns in assessing the social impact of sustainable innovation on society. Issues such as participation in the development of innovation, inclusiveness, ethics, gender and open access are considered in these sessions.
➢ This specific objective was fully attained in the second reporting period. A second round of citizen panel meetings, where citizens had the chance to see a list of research and policy priorities as developed by an expert panel, were held across the 12 participating countries in the project. Those panels allowed citizens to rank that list based on their perception of urgency and importance, adding an additional layer of legitimacy to the priorities. Different CASI teams used those results to produce several analyses, focusing on various aspects of the citizen consultation processes (based on the CIVISTI method, piloted in an earlier FP7 project). Based on those results, ARC Fund proposed to the European Commission a set of mock-up calls based on the citizens-elaborated visions and secondary analyses of their and the experts’ input. The mock-up calls successfully demonstrated the potential of citizen engagement for shaping research and innovation policies.
Specific Objective 3: Development of a common understanding of best practices in sustainable innovation management.
➢ This objective was fully attained during the second reporting period. More than 200 innovation practices were fully mapped in the online database, known as CASIPEDIA. CASIPEDIA data were one of the key sources (or tracks) for the analysis that gave grounds to the CASI-F. Another strong contribution to the attainment of this objective was the online survey and the analysis of its results, providing valuable insights into the perceptions of sustainable innovation and common underlying practices.
Specific Objective 4: Development of a framework for assessment and management of sustainable innovation.
➢ Considerable advancement towards the full attainment of this project objective was achieved during the second reporting period. The CASI-F framework was nearly complete, with only few fine touches remaining for the last 6 months of the project. Other supporting activities, such as the preparation of an online training course on the application of CASI-F was also at a very advanced stage, with the underlying web infrastructure fully prepared, and a couple of modules fully designed. It is foreseen that the CASI-F online training will consist of 9 separate modules exploring the various aspects of CASI-F, and will be addressed at interested and potential users of the Framework to enable them to prepare action roadmaps based on a self-assessment and collective intelligence gathered through the CASI mapping process. The development of CASI-F was based on the so-called triple track approach, combining analyses of: CASIPEDIA data; citizens-elaborated visions for sustainable futures; and major messages from policy briefs prepared within the project.

Potential Impact:
Specific Objective 5: Development of specific policy recommendations on how to improve innovation management and how sustainability considerations can be incorporated into it based on the findings of the assessment framework and public consultations.
➢ The full attainment of this objective is expected during the last 6 months of the project. A second annual policy report was published, which collected a number of analyses of and reflections on CASI activities, with a specific effort to emphasise inherent policy lessons. A synthesis of partner reports on national policy dialogues was also published, focusing on national relevance of CASI ambitions and achievements. Close to the end of the reporting period, the consortium started preparing the final policy report (deliverable D8.3 “Policy recommendations report”), whose key ambition is to provide a final policy overview based on CASI achievements and lessons learned.

Impacts
CASI-F – Framework for the Assessment and Management of Sustainable Innovation. CASI-F has been nearly finalised, taking into account the analysis of CASIPEDIA cases, the citizens-produced visions for sustainable futures, and the policy synopses from the policy briefs. CASI-F helps innovators identify critical issues and proposes actions to complete on strategic, tactical and operational levels, while also integrating considerations for key stakeholders – businesses, civil society, research and academia, and public governance and policy. These action roadmaps assist innovators in addressing the most critical issues they face in their business/organisation, and help them chart the steps to take to move their organisation forward with maximum success.
Policy Briefs. By 31 Dec 2016, the CASI project had produced 94 national policy briefs, and 12 EU-level policy briefs. The briefs provide detailed overview on a policy topic, relevant to sustainability and being high on the national or the EU policy agenda.
Citizens’-elaborated visions and research priorities. Citizens from 12 EU countries elaborated 50 visions, which experts analysed and transformed into 27 research and policy priorities. Those 27 priorities were presented to the same citizens, who ranked them according to urgency and importance in each country. The joint analyses of those ranked lists provided numerous interesting insights. The whole process represented a very successful citizen engagement processes as a form of mutual mobilisation and learning. The citizen perspective, which is often missing from the processes determining research and policy priorities, proved to be a valuable addition by providing a non-scientific, yet relevant, representation of citizens’ hopes and concerns for the future. The method used in CASI proved particularly useful for addressing issues of uncertainty and inherent complexity by sourcing the collective intelligence of citizens across the continent, and combining that with the scientific and disciplinary paradigms of the experts.
Policy Conference. CASI teamed up with another FP7-funded project, PE2020, for a joint policy conference on 16-17 November 2016 in Brussels, hosted by the Committee of the Regions. The CASI project hosted half of the sessions, and invited two of the four keynote speakers. More than 160 people attended over the two days. Renowned keynote speakers included Prof. Lucka Kajfez-Bogataj, a former Nobel Peace Prize laureate, together with Vice-President Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Prof. Martin Hynes, President of the European Science Foundation; Prof. Riita Maijala from the Academy of Finland; and Dr. Giuseppe Borsalino from DG Research and Innovation at the European Commission. Participants could choose to attend from 10 parallel sessions, depending on their choice of theme. The two projects collaborated closely with an external Organising Committee of experts in sustainability policy and public engagement.

List of Websites:
www.casi2020.eu

Related information

Reported by

APPLIED RESEARCH AND COMMUNICATIONS FUND
Bulgaria
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