Community Research and Development Information Service - CORDIS

H2020

ECRYPT-NET Report Summary

Project ID: 643161
Funded under: H2020-EU.1.3.1.

Periodic Reporting for period 1 - ECRYPT-NET (European Integrated Research Training Network on Advanced Cryptographic Technologies for the Internet of Things and the Cloud)

Reporting period: 2015-03-01 to 2017-02-28

Summary of the context and overall objectives of the project

The goal of this ITN is to develop advanced cryptographic techniques for the Internet of Things and the Cloud and to create implementations that offer a high level of security and increased usability, for a wide range of physical computation platforms. The ITN equips a group of 15 early stage researchers with a set of interdisciplinary skills combining mathematics, computer science and electrical engineering that will allow them to create advanced cryptographic solutions that will be available for commercial applications. The 8 partners (including 2 companies) are leading research teams in the area of applied cryptology with a strong track record of collaboration; it is complemented by 6 partner organisations from industry (including 2 SMEs). The training from the ERSs is guided by a personal development plan. A central component is training by research supported by an intensive program of workshops, summer schools, seminars, research visits, and secondments. The training is complemented with transferable skills that also support the transfer of research to an industrial context. The management structure of the project is built on a pro-active approach with responsibilization of the fellows. The dissemination and outreach of the project activities target a broad range of stakeholders. The ITN contributes to the ERA by helping to overcome the fragmentation in the area of applied cryptology. The research supports the trust and security component of the Digital Agenda for Europe and responds to the growing attention of EU policy makers for societal needs related to privacy and cybersecurity. The societal relevance and timeliness of this research has been emphasized by revelations made by Snowden, that provide clear evidence of mass surveillance by nation states and of serious weaknesses of our current infrastructure. An essential component of a response to these revelations consists a broad deployment of advanced and innovative cryptographic techniques.

Work performed from the beginning of the project to the end of the period covered by the report and main results achieved so far

Below you find an overview of the work per workpackage.
WP1 – Design for Internet of Things
ESR1 Chaoyun Li worked on automatic guess-and-determine attacks on stream ciphers. He contributed to the second objective by working on a design of lightweight linear diffusion layers that led to a submission to FSE 2017.
ESR7 Ralph Ankele has considered the security of lightweight block ciphers, in particular the SKINNY block cipher, and is the co-author of a paper which provides a cryptanalysis of this new and high-profile cipher. Moreover, he has contributed to the CAESAR competition, by producing a software benchmarking framework to compare second-round candidates.
ESR12 Simon Friedberger has analysed smart cards. He implemented an LPN (“Learning Parity with Noise”) solving algorithm and enhanced the algorithm with weights depending on value confidence. He contributed to the second objective by proposing efficiency improvement of SIDH (“Supersingular isogeny Diffie–Hellman”).

WP2 - Cryptography for the Cloud
Concerning confidentiality, project 2.1 Fully Homomorphic Encryption (ESR5) provided secure instantiations based on quantum hard problems, project 2.2 Secure Multi-Party Computation (ESR9) increased robustness via low latency and achieved active security. Project 2.4 Functional Encryption (ESR3) developed a new lattice based technique for confidentiality protection, while project 2.7 Cryptanalysis of lattice-based cryptography (ESR 14) found weaknesses in some lattice-based cryptosystems.
Concerning unlinkability, project 2.2 Secure Multi-Computation used garbling techniques to protect users privacy, project 2.3 Secure outsourcing of computation (ESR8) focussed on privacy preserving statistics, and project 2.4 Functional Encryption studied the use of block-chain techniques. Moreover, project 2.8 Privacy-preserving statistics (ESR8) studied protection measures for encrypted databases.
Concerning remote computation, project 2.1 Fully Homomorphic Encryption studied cryptosystems that allow for remote secure operations. Project 2.2 Secure Multi-Party Computation looked at Multi-Party Computation Techniques for arbitrary functionalities, while project 2.3 Secure outsourcing of computation studied the design of efficient schemes. Moreover, project 2.5 Increased efficiency and functionality through lattice-based cryptography (ESR4) developed remote computations that even fully hide the underlying algorithm that was applied to the remote data.

WP3 – Physical Security, Usability and Deployment
As planned, the three ESR fellows at BRIS, RUB, and TUE worked mostly on the first task and the ESR fellows at KUL and NXP worked mostly on the second task.
(ESR2) Danilo Šijačić contributed to the second objective by investigating hardware implementations of symmetric encryption schemes, in particular authenticated encryption schemes. The implementations are done with an eye towards side-channel resistance.
(ESR6) Erik Boss contributed to both objectives by studying symmetric cryptography, more specifically the design of S-boxes for block ciphers. Most of symmetric cryptography is not affected by quantum computers but new analysis of the interplay of different design choices is necessary. His implementation work also contributes to the second objective.
(ESR10) Marco Martinoli contributed to the first objective by investigating whether lattices can be used constructively to avoid leakage any form of side-channel analysis. Lattices themselves are an area of post-quantum cryptography and achieving leakage resilient implementations is a challenge for implementations of any system.
(ESR13) Dušan Božilov contributed to the second objective by studying side-channel resistant implementations of lightweight ciphers. Both the cipher design and the countermeasures must match highly constraint environments such as those in IoT applications.
(ESR15) Gustavo Banegas contributed to the objective of secure implementations by analysing implementations of elliptic-curve cryptography. For the first objective, he did fundamental research on quantum algorithms, applying them to new and existing problems in cryptography that are assumed to be hard, such as symmetric encryption or code-based cryptography,

WP4 – Training activities
The objectives of WP4 are to coordinate training within the network and to spread best practice and excellence around the partner organizations. In the first reporting period a Kick-Off meeting, two schools and a Cross-Workpackage Workshop were organised. We integrated complementary skills training in the network-wide schools. We also set up a complementary skills training overview website.

Progress beyond the state of the art and expected potential impact (including the socio-economic impact and the wider societal implications of the project so far)

The research in the ECRYPT-NEt project supports the trust and security component of the Digital Agenda for Europe and responds to the growing attention of policy makers for societal needs related to privacy and cybersecurity.
The societal relevance and timeliness of this research has been emphasized by revelations made by Snowden, that provide clear evidence of mass surveillance by nation states and of serious weaknesses of our current infrastructure.
An essential component of a response to these revelations consists a broad deployment of advanced and innovative cryptographic techniques.
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