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DESIGN OF AN INNOVATIVE ENERGY-AWARE IT ECOSYSTEM FOR MOTIVATING BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES TOWARDS THE ADOPTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT LIFESTYLES

DESIGN OF AN INNOVATIVE ENERGY-AWARE IT ECOSYSTEM FOR MOTIVATING BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES TOWARDS THE ADOPTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT LIFESTYLES

English EN

Moving towards a world of energy-efficient buildings

Buildings are responsible for approximately 40 % of energy consumption and 30 % of carbon dioxide emissions in the EU. But what can be done to reduce these concerning statistics? An EU-funded project has a solution.

CLIMATE CHANGE AND ENVIRONMENT

DIGITAL ECONOMY

© Antonio Skarmeta
Today, the design and development of solutions for reduced energy consumption in buildings is paramount. There is a need for innovative solutions that are based on the adoption of energy-efficient techniques and the active engagement of citizens and occupants. Leading the way “The ENTROPY project sought to address this need by building upon the integration of technologies that facilitate the deployment of innovative energy-aware IT ecosystems for motivating end-users’ behavioural changes,” outlines Dr Antonio Skarmeta Gómez, project coordinator. ENTROPY’s energy IT ecosystem will do this by taking advantage of an opportunity related to the possibilities of an IoT-based platform, big data analytics, personalised recommendations, serious games and their potential in bringing improvement in energy efficiency. “Scientific evidence has shown us that a great deal of energy in buildings was due to inadequate behaviours. We also saw that there was a wave of IoT sweeping over buildings," adds Dr Skarmeta Gómez. How does it work? The solution is activated when a campaign manager initiates an energy efficiency campaign through the ENTROPY platform. From there, they specify the building areas and in return receive a set of installed sensors per area. After this, data monitoring systems are triggered and stored in the ENTROPY repository in a standardised way. Upon the collection of this data, a set of services are provided. The campaign manager produces energy and behavioural analytics. Then, based on the analysis of results and the profile of each user, personalised services and messages are sent to each user. End users then use ENTROPY services through a personalised application or serious games on their smartphones. They will receive real-time data from sensors and recommendations for realising energy efficient action. A step closer Dr Skarmeta Gómez says that the overall result of the project “is the large amount of savings that one might find when incorporating a solution as the one developed in this project.” ENTROPY was also able to show how energy waste could be reduced. “It was very valuable to see how a solution as this one can make visible what was hidden before and therefore quantify the energy waste that in some cases was seen to be really large, and most importantly, completely unknown by the building users,” adds Dr Skarmeta Gómez. The solution, through timed and personalised messages, also empowers users with the tools to save energy. ENTROPY moving forward “This project has generated a great deal of interest,” says Dr Skarmeta Gómez. The support of the EU Commission allowed the project to keep an eye out for future prospects. It is because of this, “we would not be surprised if the solution developed in ENTROPY – accessible through the platform on the project’s website – is used in the future as a way of managing energy use in public buildings,” notes Dr Skarmeta Gómez. The project will now pursue the IoT-based platform that was developed and the solution for behavioural change based on serious games by looking at its commercial feasibility. A future of energy-efficient buildings is on the horizon.

Keywords

ENTROPY, buildings, energy efficient, energy consumption, behavioural change, IoT, serious games, IT ecosystem, energy waste

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 649849

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 September 2015

  • End date

    30 November 2018

Funded under:

H2020-EU.3.3.1.

  • Overall budget:

    € 2 439 467,50

  • EU contribution

    € 1 997 592,50

Coordinated by:

UNIVERSIDAD DE MURCIA