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TACIS 1992 actions for energy

Energy received the largest share of the TACIS budget in 1991 (ECU 115 million out of a total ECU 400 million) and continued to feature among the priority sectors for 1992. Approximately ECU 45 million went to the regional programme and non-nuclear projects in each of the New ...

Energy received the largest share of the TACIS budget in 1991 (ECU 115 million out of a total ECU 400 million) and continued to feature among the priority sectors for 1992. Approximately ECU 45 million went to the regional programme and non-nuclear projects in each of the New Independent States (NIS). ECU 100 million were reserved for nuclear safety. The detailed breakdown of the funding was as follows: - Armenia (ECU 1 million) for a study to assess Armenia's hydrocarbon deposits and for the provision of advice to government on the establishment of an energy centre; - Azerbaijan (ECU 1.5 million) for provision of advice to government in the areas of energy policy and restructuring and the establishment of a legal framework with a view to attracting foreign investment and the promotion of energy saving; - Belarus (ECU 1.9 million) for establishing a group of experts to provide advice on energy strategy; - Georgia (ECU 0.5 million) for advice to the electricity board on the development of energy policy, management and organizational issues, energy efficiency and the formation of joint ventures; - Kazakhstan (ECU 4 million) for establishing a high-level advisory group, a management training centre, an energy centre and for implementing a study on hydrocarbons exploration; - Kyrgyzstan (ECU 1.5 million) for advice to government in the fields of energy strategy, restructuring the electricity sector, hydroelectric resource planning, administration of the oil and gas sector and energy saving; - Moldova (ECU 2.19 million) for advice to government on the development of an energy supply strategy and for support in restructuring and, in particular, converting to normal funding conditions; -Moscow (ECU 4.8 million) for assistance in developing key energy policies at the levels of government, related agencies and regional authorities and industries; - St. Petersburg (ECU 4 million) for support for projects to demonstrate energy efficiency techniques, training for major energy suppliers, advice to industry and public information measures; - Turkmenistan (ECU 1 million) for advice to government in the areas of sector restructuring, the establishment of legal, pricing and taxation regimes aimed at attracting foreign investors and training in energy efficiency; - Tyumen (ECU 7.2 million) for an oil and gas subprogramme and for energy conservation in district heating systems and power plants and for the establishment of an energy centre; - Tadjikistan (suspended pending improvement in the political situation); - Ukraine (ECU 8.08 million) for advice in the fields of energy strategy, energy pricing and tariff structures, oil and gas strategy, transit tariffs, pilot energy conservation measures, training and information; - Uzbekistan (ECU 6.28 million) for advice to government and industry in the oil and gas sectors, for training in key aspects of electricity utility management, advice to government and establishment of an energy centre to promote energy efficiency; - Regional programme (ECU 1.5 million) to improve management of the oil and gas pipeline system in Central Asia; - Nuclear (ECU 100 million) of which ECU 20 million were allocated for the establishment of the International Science and Technology Centre in Moscow in conjunction with the USA, Japan and Russia. The remaining ECU 80 million were used to improve the safety of nuclear installations in the NIS (operational safety, design safety, and assistance to safety authorities).

Countries

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan

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