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Next-generation batteries for stationary energy storage


The objective is to develop and validate or demonstrate innovative next-generation battery technologies for stationary energy storage that have a low cost, high safety, high depth of discharge, and high cycle life and efficiency. Development must include the integration of sensors and/or battery management electronics in the cell, and the potential for upscaling the battery systems. The battery systems should have optimal sustainability throughout the entire supply chain, including the substitution of critical raw materials. A key issue is the design of an efficient production process with minimal environmental impacts across the whole life-cycle, including recycling. Solutions must be validated or demonstrated in a relevant environment. Since cost is the most important driver for grid scale electricity storage, targets for key performance indicators such as capital cost, storage cost and end-of-life cost should be set. ""Balance of plant"" components should be included in cost estimates.

The activities are expected to bring the technology from TRL 3 to TRL 5 (please see part G of the General Annexes).

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 6 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Stationary applications such as utility grids and industrial sites require storage applications that have the ability to combine high power and heavy use, going through multiple deep cycles per day, with a long lifetime and maximum safety. In addition, future battery systems should have optimal sustainability throughout the entire supply chain, including the substitution of critical raw materials, second-life, and recycling. Current generation Li-ion batteries, despite their success in e-mobility, may not be the ultimate solution for stationary storage; in addition, the growth of Li-Ion battery market is not enough to meet the demand for stationary and e-mobility applications. Interest in next-generation Li-ion and non-Li-ion batteries (for example molten salt, metal-air, lithium-sulphur, sodium, flow batteries, solid state, new ion-based systems) for these applications is growing, but many fundamental and technological obstacles remain to be overcome. This challenge is in line with the identified priorities in the context of the SET-Plan.

Project results are expected to contribute to:

  • Assure best possible performance and lifecycle for the next-generation battery technologies for stationary energy storage at lowest cost, in particular by putting the energy storage cost on the path to fall below 0.05 €/kWh/cycle by 2030;
  • Reduce the pressure on limited natural resources due to longer battery lifespan, improved recyclability and the use of more abundant and less harmful materials;
  • Speeding up development and subsequent deployment of batteries for energy storage applications.