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Adaptive Management of Barriers in European Rivers

Adaptive Management of Barriers in European Rivers

Objective

Rivers rank among some of the most threatened ecosystems in the world, and are the focus of costly restoration programmes that cost billions to taxpayers. Much of Europe depends on water from rivers for drinking, food production, and the generation of hydropower, which is essential for meeting the EU renewable energy target. Yet only half the EU surface waters have met the WFD’s 2015 target of good ecological status, due in part to the fragmentation of habitats caused by tens of thousands of dams and weirs which also pose a flood hazard. Some barriers are old and out of use, but may have historical value, while the life span of others will soon come to an end and may need to be removed. But barriers also provide energy, water, fishing and leisure opportunities, and may also help to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species. Improving stream connectivity has been flagged as one of the priorities for more efficient stream restoration but effective rehabilitation of ecosystem functioning in European rivers needs to take the complexity and trade-offs imposed by barriers into account.

AMBER will deliver innovative solutions to river fragmentation in Europe by developing more efficient methods of restoring stream connectivity through adaptive barrier management. The project seeks to address the complex challenge of river fragmentation through a comprehensive barrier adaptive management process, based on the integration of programme design, management, and monitoring to systematically test assumptions about barrier mitigation, adapt and learn.
Leaflet | Map data © OpenStreetMap contributors, Credit: EC-GISCO, © EuroGeographics for the administrative boundaries

Coordinator

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY

Address

Singleton Park
Sa2 8pp Swansea

United Kingdom

Activity type

Higher or Secondary Education Establishments

EU Contribution

€ 1 145 540,25

Participants (20)

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UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 654 727,50

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHAMPTON

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 422 665

UNIVERSITY OF THE HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

United Kingdom

EU Contribution

€ 300 277,50

DANMARKS TEKNISKE UNIVERSITET

Denmark

EU Contribution

€ 397 311,25

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK - NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, CORK

Ireland

EU Contribution

€ 150 750

IASCACH INTIRE EIREANN

Ireland

EU Contribution

€ 149 147,50

STICHTING WERELD VISMIGRATIE

Netherlands

EU Contribution

€ 832 750

UNIVERSIDAD DE OVIEDO

Spain

EU Contribution

€ 209 128,75

ASOCIACION PARA EL ESTUDIO Y MEJORADE LOS SALMONIDOS AEMS

Spain

EU Contribution

€ 164 711,25

EUROPEJSKIE REGIONALNE CENTRUM EKOHYDROLOGII POLSKIEJ AKADEMII NAUK

Poland

EU Contribution

€ 252 778,75

INSTYTUT RYBACTWA SRODLADOWEGO IM STANISTAWA SAKOWICZA

Poland

EU Contribution

€ 257 880

POLITECNICO DI MILANO

Italy

EU Contribution

€ 249 625

CONSERVATOIRE NATIONAL DU SAUMON SAUVAGE

France

EU Contribution

€ 179 500

WWF SCHWEIZ

Switzerland

KAUPPERT KLEMENS

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 226 500

SYDKRAFT HYDROPOWER AB

Sweden

EU Contribution

€ 51 125

INNOGY SE

Germany

EU Contribution

€ 61 625

RWE INNOGY GMBH

Germany

JRC -JOINT RESEARCH CENTRE- EUROPEAN COMMISSION

Belgium

EU Contribution

€ 186 630

ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE

France

EU Contribution

€ 127 500

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 689682

Status

Ongoing project

  • Start date

    1 June 2016

  • End date

    31 May 2020

Funded under:

H2020-EU.3.5.2.

  • Overall budget:

    € 6 238 103,75

  • EU contribution

    € 6 020 172,75

Coordinated by:

SWANSEA UNIVERSITY

United Kingdom