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Design Rules for Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Systems

Objective

The objective of the project was to produce a comprehensive report detailing recommendations for a proposed set of European design rules for computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems. One type of rule relates to the function and design of particularsubsystems. A second type of rule relates to the nature, scope and form of the data constituting the interfaces between subsystems. The programme was divided into four parts:
-processing strategy
-communications study/strategy
-integration of processing and communications
-general management.
The objective of the project was to produce a comprehensive report detailing recommendations for a proposed set of European design rules for computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems. One type of rule relates to the function and design of particular subsystems. A second type of rule relates to the nature, scope and form of the data constituting the interfaces between subsystems. The programme was divided into 4 parts; processing strategy, communications study and strategy, integration of processing and communications, and general management. 5 CIM subsystems computer aided process engineering (CAPE), computer aided design (CAD), computer aided process planning (CAPP), computer aided system testing (CAST) and computer aided manufacture (CAM) were analysed and flowcharts prepared. These detailed in chronological sequence the activities and procedures required to take a product from initial design to final manufacture. The end results have been widely used by the developers of systems, whether manually operated or computer based, to define the boundaries within which subsystems operate and to identify interfacing requirements.
Five CIM subsystems (CAPE, CAD, CAPP, CAST and CAM) were analysed and flowcharts prepared. These detailed in chronological sequence the activities and procedures required to take a product from initial design to final manufacture.
Exploitation
The end results have been widely used by the developers of systems, whether manually operated or computer based, to clearly define the boundaries within which subsystems operate and to identify interfacing requirements. The work has made a significant contribution to many other ESPRIT projects.

Coordinator

Not Available