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Logistics-based design (LOGBASED)

Final Report Summary - LOGBASED (Logistics-based design)

The LOGBASED methodology has been utilised in four case studies in order to test, verify and further develop the methodology through designing ships accommodating the requirements and expectations relating the respective routes.

The Atlantic case is a business case investigating roll on - roll off (RORO) sea transport services between Spain and the British Isles. The main expectation is to provide a regular liner service with fixed and non-rolling schedules with at least four departures per week. Second driving expectation is to provide a service offering a 30 % customer saving in port to port costs. The dominant ship expectations are adequate capacity, speed, harbour times and frequency of departures. Special challenge to the ship design is coping with the weather conditions in a given schedule. Main innovation is a vessel optimised for three different operational modes, enabling efficient operation in all expected conditions. The developed configuration also improves significantly the redundancy and flexibility (e.g. the ability of the vessel to be shifted to a variety of different routes) of the design compared to existing designs. Second innovation is the constant search for simplicity and focus oriented minimisation, which resulted in a design with 10 % more capacity in a ship with 10 % less volume than comparable competition. The third innovation is the LOGBASED approach, where all transport system and design related decisions are made in a systematic and documented way.

The Baltic case is a business case that investigates in services in the north-eastern part of the Baltic Sea. The character of the business is to look into the possibilities of new services in the area. Dominant transport system expectations mainly reflect the uncertainties of a completely new service. Further, expectations concerning the future development of the cargo volumes relate directly to the nature of the transport system that has been developed. In addition, schedule related expectation drive the development of the transport system. Beyond this, usual expectations on the profitability do exist. The resulting ship design has been driven mainly by the expectations on the cargo volumes, and on frequency of the service. One innovation is, that due to the specific performance measurement one type of cargo has been deliberately removed from the transport system - initially there were requirements to transport this cargo, the result is that no service is offered for this cargo. The second innovation is how the transport system has been assembled in order to provide a fixed schedule with the required number of roundtrips for the cargo volume that is available today. This initial set-up of the transport system inherently provides means for upgrading the system in the future. A third innovation is the approach, how the transport system solves issues related to terminal capabilities that are available at present.

The Hydro case transport system operates amidst the three main cities in the west of Norway, Bergen, Haugesund and Stavanger, having a population of approaching one million. The targeted cargo is aluminium cargo and general cargo in trucks. Vessels are able to carry trailers on weather deck and aluminium cargo in the holds. The character of the business is to replace the existing tonnage with an liquefied natural gas (LNG)-fuelled cargo ship enabling the keep the freight prices at the same level. In addition the new transport system will aim to attract road-based cargo today being transported by trucks using the ro-pax ferries out of Norway. The main expectation is to provide a regular liner service with a fixed weekly schedule. Second driving expectation is to provide a service offering a 30 % improvement in emissions to the same costs as today's services. The dominant ship expectations are adequate capacity, speed, harbour times and frequency of departures. Special challenge to the ship design is develop a new aluminium cargo handling system keeping port time low and providing requirements for a lower speed at sea. The use of LNG as fuel is the first demonstrator on a RORO cargo ship. The third innovation is the LOGBASED approach, where all transport system and design related decisions are made in a systematic and documented way.

The Rhine case is a business case investigating STORO / RORO sea transport services between Norway and the river Rhine. The character of the business is to improve the current service by reducing harbour time. This will reduce costs to the benefit of the customer. Profitability is sought after by transporting also RORO cargo. The main expectation is to provide a regular liner service with fixed and non-rolling schedule. Current service is very cost competitive, so the challenge is to improve it. The dominant ship expectations are adequate capacity, speed, harbour times and frequency of departures. Special challenge to the ship design is the availability of aft loading possibility only in some ports. Thus other means of loading must be considered (also). Main innovation is a vessel with significantly faster loading of logs and anodes compared to existing designs, enabling shorter harbour times and slower sailing speed. Second innovation is a design able to simultaneously carry required amount of STORO cargo and in addition trailers. Third innovation is the option to choose environmentally friendly gas machinery without loss of capacity. Fourth innovation is the LOGBASED approach, where all transport system and design related decisions are made in a systematic and documented way.

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