Skip to main content

Neurorehabilitation using Brain-Computer Interface

Final Report Summary - REHABCI (Neurorehabilitation using brain-computer interface)

EU-project REHABCI (PERG02-GA-2007-224753) is analysing the possibilities of using different non-invasive brain–computer interface (BCI) approaches that have been extensively validated for movement rehabilitation at patients with severe motor disabilities. This was done through existing collaborations of Institute of Automation (IAT) with academic and industry partners across several disciplines which allow a supra-disciplinary research. During its duration

REHABCI project resulted in several papers (conference and journals), posters, presentations, and tutorial talks. The following list summarises the most important REHABCI's scientific dissemination in the time frame from the start of the project in March 2008 to the project end in February 2011.

Scientific dissemination (selected publications):
- I. Volosyak, H. Cecotti and A. Gräser: Optimal visual stimuli on LCD screens for SSVEP based brain-computer interfaces; 4th int. IEEE EMBS on Neural Engineering, 28.04-02.05 2009, Antalya, Turkey, pp. 447-450.
- H. Cecotti, I. Volosyak and A. Gräser: Evaluation of an SSVEP based brain-computer interface on the command and application levels; 4th Int. IEEE EMBS on Neural Engineering, 28.04-02.05 2009, Antalya, Turkey, pp. 474-477.
- I. Volosyak, H. Cecotti and A. Gräser: Impact of frequency selection on LCD screens for SSVEP based brain-computer interfaces; 10th Int. Work-Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (IWANN2009), Salamanca, Spain, 10-12 June 2009, pp. 706-713.
- I. Volosyak, H. Cecotti, D. Valbuena, and A. Gräser: Evaluation of the Bremen SSVEP based BCI in real world conditions; 11th Int. Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009, Kyoto, Japan, June 23-26, 2009, pp. 322-331.
- I. Volosyak, H. Cecotti and A. Gräser: Steady-state visual evoked potential response - impact of the time segment length; 7th Int. Conference on Biomedical Engineering BioMed2010, Innsbruck, Austria, February 17-19, 2010, pp. 288-292.
- B. Allison, T. Lüth, D. Valbuena, A. Teymourian, I. Volosyak, and A. Gräser: BCI Demographics: How many (and what kinds of) people can use an SSVEP BCI? IEEE Trans. Neural Syst. Rehabil. Eng., vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 107-116, Apr. 2010.
- H. Gollee, I. Volosyak, A. J. McLachlan, K. J. Hunt, and A. Gräser: An SSVEP based brain-computer interface for the control of functional electrical stimulation; IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 57, no. 8, pp. 1 847-1 855; 2010.
- A. Gräser, I. Volosyak: 'BRAINROBOT - Methods and applications for brain-computer interfaces'; Aachen: Shaker Verlag; 2010; ISBN: 978-3-8322-8201-1

- I. Volosyak, T. Malechka, D. Valbuena, and A. Graeser, 'A novel calibration method for SSVEP based brain-computer interfaces,' Proc. 18th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO 2010), 2010, pp. 939-943.
- D. Valbuena, I. Volosyak, and A. Gräser, "sBCI: fast detection of steady-state visual evoked potentials,' Proc. IEEE EMBC'10, Sep. 2010, pp. 3 966-3 969.
- I. Volosyak, C. Guger, and A. Gräser, 'Toward BCI wizard - best BCI approach for each user,' in Proc. IEEE EMBC'10, Sep. 2010, pp. 4 201-4 204.
- I. Volosyak, D. Valbuena, T. Malechka, J. Peuscher, and A. Gräser: 'Brain-computer interface using water-based electrodes"; J. Neural Eng.; 2010; vol. 7, p. 066007
- I. Volosyak: 'SSVEP based Bremen-BCI - boosting information transfer rates,' J. Neural Eng.; 2011; accepted
- I. Volosyak, D. Valbuena, T. Lüth, T. Malechka, and A. Gräser: 'BCI demographics II: how many (and what kinds of) people can use a high frequency SSVEP BCI?,' IEEE Trans. Neural Syst. Rehab. Eng., 2011, in press.
- I. Volosyak, A. Moor, and A. Gräser: 'A dictionary-driven SSVEP speller with a modified graphical user interface,' Proc. IWANN'2011, 2011, J. Cabestany et al. (Eds.): LNCS, Springer, accepted

These efforts may also foster progress in related disciplines, including neurophysiology, BCIs for communication, robotics, and recovery from other disorders such as aphasia or motor disability produced by injury or disease.