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New Architectures for Optical Processing in Industrial Applications

Objective

The feasibility of optical processors for object recognition in laboratory environments was successfully demonstrated in projects 534 and 1035 (COOP).

Different optical processing architectures were compared so as to fully exploit the technology developed in earlier projects in new applications. This led to a recommendation for a practical architecture suitable for application to industrial problems in the very near future.
A multichannel photorefractive optical joint transform correlator capable of performing sorting tasks for robotic applications has been designed, implemented and tested. The use of mini yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) lasers and crystal spatial light modulators, in conjunction with updatable holographic bismuth silicon oxide (BSO) crystals has resulted in a compact correlator (600 by 300 by 300 mm) with real time capabilities (100 ms recognition speed). Flexibility is a built in feature and correlation is demonstrated for various applications. Electronic and optical preand postprocessing for improving the demonstrator performances are also proposed.

The feasibility of optical processors for object recognition in laboratory environments was successfully demonstrated in previous projects. The goal of this project was to integrate the latest device and material developments with these new architectures in practical processors for use in industrial inspection, quality control, associative classification and signal processing. The first phase was a definition phase, where different architectures in optical processing were considered so as to fully exploit the technology developed in earlier projects in new applications.
A comparison of the possible approaches was completed with a recommendation of a practical suitable for application to industrial problems in the very near future. In the second phase of the project, a demonstrator integrating this architecture in a practical industrial application was developed and demonstrated.
A demonstrator integrating this architecture in a practical industrial application was completed by the end of 1991.

Components of the system will be reused in further designs by Thomson-CSF. The demonstrator will form a basis for advanced industrial applications in user organisations, and in the successor project, NAOPIA II (6676).

Coordinator

Thomson CSF
Address
Domaine De Corbeville
91404 Orsay
France

Participants (3)

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen Nürnberg
Germany
Address
Erwin Rommel Straße 1
91058 Erlangen
Krupp Entwicklungszentrum GmbH
Germany
Address
Münchener Straße 100
45145 Essen
RISOE NATIONAL LABORATORY
Denmark
Address
, 49
4000 Roskilde