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Socially inclusive health care financing in West Africa and India
Short title: Financing health care for inclusion

Objective

Recent health financing reforms in low and middle income countries aim to introduce affordable prepayment and subsidies for low socio-economic groups. However, while such reforms have led to increased utilization of care, often the poor and informal sector continue to be excluded from coverage.

Health Inc. puts forward the hypothesis that social exclusion is an important cause of the limited success of recent health financing reforms. First, social exclusion can explain barriers to accessing health care due to disrespectful, discriminatory or culturally inappropriate practices of medical professionals and their organisations, within the context of poor accessibility and quality of care. As a consequence, removing financial barriers does not necessarily guarantee equitable access to care. Second, social exclusion can explain barriers to accessing the health financing mechanism itself. Differential access to information, bureaucratic processes, complex eligibility rules and/or crude and stigmatizing criteria for means testing prevent socially excluded groups from enrolling in financing schemes, even if they are fully subsidised. Social inclusion, by contrast, may explain why more powerful, wealthy and vocal groups disproportionately ‘capture’ the benefits of publicly funded health care.

In four countries/states (Ghana, Karnataka, Maharashtra and Senegal), Health Inc. employs mixed methods to analyse whether different types of financing arrangements overcome social exclusion and also increase social inclusion by empowering socially marginalised groups. A multi-sectoral stakeholder analysis will also explore whether vulnerable populations participate in policy making and whether their needs are understood.

Health Inc. will compare policies across contexts in order to elicit lessons. Local policy makers and population groups will then be consulted in a feasibility analysis to identify and test policy recommendations, which will be widely disseminated.

Call for proposal

FP7-HEALTH-2010-single-stage
See other projects for this call

Coordinator

LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Address
Houghton Street 1
WC2A 2AE London
United Kingdom
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
EU contribution
€ 830 229,07
Administrative Contact
Milena Vasileva (Ms.)

Participants (5)

PRINS LEOPOLD INSTITUUT VOOR TROPISCHE GENEESKUNDE
Belgium
EU contribution
€ 589 787,20
Address
Nationalestraat 155
2000 Antwerpen
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Administrative Contact
Bart Criel (Dr.)
Tata Institute of Social Sciences
India
EU contribution
€ 338 261,12
Address
V.n.purav Marg, Deonar
400088 Mumbai
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Administrative Contact
Harshad Thakur (Prof.)
INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH
India
EU contribution
€ 345 401,92
Address
4Th Cross, Jp Nagar 3Rd Phase 138
560078 Bangalore
Activity type
Research Organisations
Administrative Contact
Devadasan Narayanan (Dr.)
CENTRE DE RECHERCHE SUR LES POLITIQUES SOCIALES
Senegal
EU contribution
€ 325 990,71
Address
Rue E X Leon Gontan Damas Fann Residence
25233 Dakar
Activity type
Other
Administrative Contact
Ndiaye Alfred (Dr.)
UNIVERSITY OF GHANA
Ghana
EU contribution
€ 334 376,31
Address
.
N/A Legon Accra
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Administrative Contact
Felix Ankomah Asante (Dr.)