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Architecting Manufacturing Industries and systems for Adaptability

Final Report Summary - AMISA (Architecting Manufacturing Industries and systems for Adaptability)

Executive Summary:
Systems provide value through their ability to fulfill stakeholders’ needs. Inevitably, these needs evolve over time and diverge from an original system’s capabilities. Thus, the system must be disposed of or periodically upgraded at substantial cost.
The objective of the AMISA project is to develop a generic, quantitative methodology for architecting manufacturing lines, product systems and customer services for optimal adaptability to unforeseen changes in stakeholder needs, technology development, and government regulations. The methodology will be validated in six real-life pilot projects to provide concrete evidence that it is: 1) Generic and tailorable, 2) Scalable, 3) Usable and 4) Cost effective.

Project Context and Objectives:
AMISA will deliver a step-change in the performance of European industry, characterized by a higher reactivity to needs and more economically compatible products and services. Manufacturing systems or products/services designed for adaptability will save 20% either in cost or cycle time and increase their valuable lifespan by 25%. During manufacturing these systems will consume less energy and natural resources and produce less pollution and waste. Adaptable systems will also be more amenable to adjustments in regulatory frameworks (i.e. environmental, health, safety, etc.).

Project Results:
The main S & T results/foregrounds involves a better understanding of the participants regarding their needs and expectations vis-à-vis a generic, quantitative methodology for architecting manufacturing lines, product systems and customer services. In addition the following industrial participants indicated specific and real potential gains which are achievable by re-architecting their production lines or products using DFA methodology and tool developed within the AMISA project:

Potential Impact:
The potential impact is:
1. TTPS
TTPS indicated that AMISA provided insight into upgrading its cap applicator machine a key element in the liquid packaging production line. Next generation cap applicator machine will be able to apply different size caps on different size liquid packages, a new capability for future TTPS production lines.
2. MAG-IAS
MAG-IAS indicated that AMISA provided insight into re-architecting its fiber-placement head which is mounted on top of buckling arm robot, part of the production line at MAG-IAS. The new architecture will combine several components in two portions of the fiber-placement head, thereby reducing component costs and work.
3. IAI
IAI indicated that AMISA provided insight into re-architecting its Vehicle Localization System (VLS), the control subsystem of IAI’s Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV). The new architecture will combine several components in two portions of the subsystem. No analysis is yet available as to the potential savings of this design.
4. TTI
TTI indicated that AMISA provided insight into re-architecting its Solid State Power Amplifier (SSPA). An SSPA is a transmitter power amplifier that uses semiconductor devices (transistors) for all amplification. The key redesign feature is to combine certain components in the system whereby eliminating relatively expensive interfaces. This approach must also support different variants of the system, providing different levels of power outputs as well as utilizing different external electricity sources.

List of Websites:

The AMISA project public website, containing relevant information on the project and related issues has been achieved (see www.amisa.eu). The public portion of the website is available for the general community and includes information about the AMISA project, its partners and the key project results and achievements. It also references all project publications, brochures, presentations and any other material, which may be generally distributed.