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The Marie Curie Training Programme in Applied Health Economics

Final Activity Report Summary - APPHEC (The Marie Curie Training Programme in Applied Health Economics)

The programme consisted of a series of events which all had relevance for training and networking for young researchers in the field of health economics:
- a two-week course in Applied Health Economics held in York;
- a three-day 'Master Class' in Thessaoloniki lead by Professors Badi Baltagi and Pravin Trivedi;
- a three-day international conference held in Thessaloniki which was attended by all of the course participants along with other international researchers;
- A three-day 'Master Class' in Bergen lead by Professor William Greene;
- a three-day international conference held in Bergen which was attended by all of the course participants along with other international researchers;
- a three-day 'Master Class' in Coimbra lead by Professors Maarten Lindeboom and John Mullahy;
- a three-day international conference held in Coimbra which was attended by all of the course participants along with other international researchers.

Master classes

In Thessaloniki, Professors Badi Baltagi and Pravin Trivedi lead courses on the use of panel data and on topics in programme evaluation. The course was made up of lectures and student discussions.

In Bergen, Professor William Greene led a short course on the use of econometrics in health economics. Topics included models for discrete choice, especially multinomial choices, efficiency estimation and analysis of costs. The course was made up of lectures, PhD student participant presentations and computer-based practical sessions.

In Coimbra the master class had two components: duration models and applications in health, sickness and mortality (Prof. Maarten Lindeboom) and heterogeneity in econometric evaluations (Prof. John Mullahy). The course was made up of lectures and student discussions.

The scientific output for this project was focused on the European Workshop on Econometrics and Health Economics held in Thessaloniki, Bergen and Coimbra. Each conference took place immediately after the training workshops to facilitate participation by trainees, all of whom attended the conference. In a deliberate attempt to create an informal atmosphere in which younger professionals could integrate themselves more easily, the number of participants of the conferences was limited to around 55 and many of the trainees delivered or discussed papers. Each programme consisted of 14 papers and these are outlined in the relevant periodic reports. Many of these papers have been published or will be published in Health Economics.

Presentation slots in the conference programme were reserved for trainees. The trainees received feedback from nominated discussants selected from the more experienced researchers in the field and have the opportunity to submit their papers to the international journal Health Economics. Trainees were actively involved as discussants of papers at the conference and are serving as referees of papers submitted to Health Economics.

The conferences also served a crucial role in giving the trainees the opportunity to integrate with the academic community working in applied health economics, to receive guidance from more senior researchers and to interest others in their own research. Such contact is crucial for the arrangement of subsequent study visits and the initiation of joint research.