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Deployment of Societally Beneficial Nano- and Material Technologies in European Partnership Countries

Final Report Summary - NANOMAT-EPC (Deployment of Societally Beneficial Nano- and Material Technologies in European Partnership Countries)

Executive Summary:
The overall objective of NANOMAT-EPC was to support the deployment of societally beneficial nano- and materials technologies in the EPC, in order to increase exploitation of their scientific results and contribute to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. The project aimed to achieve its overall objective via the following groups of activities:

i) Identification of nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in the EPC.
ii) Networking of public and private organisations to support nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer in the EPC.
iii) Implementation of pilot nano- and materials technologies deployment projects via education, training and exchange of scientists between the EPC and European partners.

The main work and achievements were the following:

WP2: Opportunities Identification
• Final version of the online brochure of EPC nano- & materials organisations & technologies (Deliverable 2.3) – featuring 56 nano- and material organisations in EPC - submitted to EC on schedule.
• Input report “Nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in the South Caucasus region” produced for the workshop in Tbilisi, Georgia.
• Input report “Nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in Belarus” produced for the workshop in Minsk, Belarus.
• Input report “Nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in Ukraine” produced for the workshop in Kyiv, Ukraine.
• Output Report “Insights into the Nanomaterials Research and Technology Sectors in the Eastern Partnership Countries and Collaboration with the European Union” (Deliverable 2.4) submitted to EC on schedule.

WP3: Networking
• The workshop and brokerage event in Tbilisi was successfully held on 25 June 2014. 52 participants attended.
• The workshop and brokerage event in Minsk was successfully held on 11 November 2014. 35 participants attended.
• The workshop and brokerage event in Kyiv was successfully held on 6 October 2015. 62 participants attended.
• The consortium partners have networked with fourteen other related FP7 and H2020 projects.
Seven H2020 proposals have been submitted involving eight consortium partners.
• The H2020 Marie Curie RISE proposal INTELUM – involving IPR-NAS and Intelligentsia – has been selected for funding and started in March 2015.

WP4: Pilot Nano- and Materials Technologies Deployment Projects
• Education and training visits were made by all of the EPC partners to their respective EU partners.
• Education and training visits were made by all of the EU partners to their respective EPC partners.
• 70 zirconia anodes produced and tested by IPMS and UB.
• 100 electrodes made of ordered and disordered hybrid CNT/graphene nanostructures produced and tested by BSUIR and Cleancarb.
• 12 radiation sensor elements based on rare earth elements produced and tested by GTU and PSUD.
• 6 radiation sensor elements based on boron doped silicon nanostructures produced and tested by GTU and PSUD.
• 5 nanosensor devices - based on novel smart sensor systems - produced and tested by GTU and PSUD.
• 3.2g of ferromagnetic (Ni – Cu)/C nanocomposites produced and tested by IPR-NAS and LZH.
• 1.2g of superparamagnetic (Ni – Cu)/C nanocomposites produced and tested by IPR-NAS and LZH.
• Intermediary report (Deliverable 4.1) Final report (Deliverable 4.2) and Publishable report on the final results of the four pilot projects (Deliverable 4.3) submitted to EC on schedule.

WP5: Dissemination and Promotion
• Deliverables 5.1 - 5.7 concerning the project website and promotion materials submitted to EC on schedule.
• The project has been promoted at about 40 international conferences and events (e.g. CeBIT).
• Over 20 research papers were presented at international conferences (e.g. EMRS Fall Meetings 2015 and Nanotech France) or published in international journals (e.g. American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics, Nano and Journal of Electrochemical Science and Engineering).
Project Context and Objectives:
The overall objective of NANOMAT-EPC was to support the deployment of societally beneficial nano- and materials technologies in the EPC, in order to increase exploitation of their scientific results and contribute to the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. The project aimed to achieve its overall objective via the following groups of activities:

i) Identification of nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in the EPC.

This activity had two sub-objectives.

The first sub-objective was to prepare the way for workshops in Tbilisi, Minsk and Kyiv to identify nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in EPC for healthcare, clean energy and environmental applications. In order to achieve this aim, we prepared three input reports – South Caucasus region, Belarus and Ukraine - describing nano- and materials organisations, knowledge/technology transfer opportunities, sector strengths and weaknesses, potential markets, public/private investment sources to facilitate technology commercialisation/transfer. The input reports were prepared and distributed beforehand to workshop participants.

The second sub-objective was to prepare a publishable output report on nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in EPC countries based on the input reports and workshop discussions as well as the project’s mapping exercise and pilot deployment projects. Importantly, this report contained recommendations for the RTD community, private industry, government and European Commission.

ii) Networking of public and private organisations to support nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer in the EPC.

This activity had three sub-objectives.

The first sub-objective was to help European organisations involved with nano- and materials technologies to become more knowledgeable of their EPC counterparts. In order to achieve this aim, we contacted 100+ EPC organisations and compiled 1-2 page profile datasheets for the 30+ strongest ones. An online brochure, comprised of the profile datasheets, was made available in English via the NANOMAT-EPC web-portal. It was also distributed during email communications with European organisations.

The second sub-objective was to help EPC organisations involved with nano- and materials technologies to become more aware and engage more in knowledge and technology transfer. In order to achieve this aim, we organised three separate events covering the EPC region:

• Tbilisi: well situated for organisations from Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan;
• Minsk: well situated for organisations from across Belarus; and
• Kyiv: well situated for organisations from across Ukraine.

The events comprised: i) Workshop to discuss nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in EPC for healthcare, clean energy and environmental applications and ii) Brokerage dedicated to networking, presentations and training to support nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in EPC for healthcare, clean energy and environmental applications.

The third sub-objective was to support networking with national and EU funded research projects.

iii) Implementation of pilot nano- and materials technologies deployment projects via education, training and exchange of scientists between the EPC and European partners.

The sub-objective of this activity was to boost the capacity of the EPC consortium partners in knowledge and technology transfer via pilot projects in WP4. In order to achieve this, each EPC consortium partner implemented a bilateral pilot deployment project with an EU consortium partner. The bilateral pilot projects provided a focus for the capacity building support - education, training and exchange of scientists - between the EPC and EU consortium partners.
Project Results:
The main S&T results/foregrounds came from the pilot nano- and materials technologies deployment projects (WP4). The two year collaboration pilot projects involved short term exchanges and training in scientific techniques.

Pilot Project with Armenia
In recent years, the Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR-NAS) has developed a method of solid-phase pyrolysis of phthalocyanines. This has enabled IPR-NAS to synthesise ferromagnetic (Ni, Co, Fe) and superparamagnetic nanoparticles in different carbon matrices, which have potential use for self-regulating magnetic hyperthermia in oncology and as contrast-agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

Magnetic hyperthermia works on the principle that magnetic nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field of specific amplitude and frequency. By positioning the nanoparticles close to a tumour and then subjecting them to a localised alternating magnetic field, the tumour can be heated up and destroyed.

To facilitate the transfer of the technology and associated knowledge to the healthcare sector, IPR-NAS needed the support of Laser Zentrum Hannover (LZH) to educate and train them in:

i) how to measure the structural and magnetic characteristics of ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic (Ni – Cu)/C nanocomposites with Curie temperatures in the range of 42-47 degrees centigrade and
ii) how to test the best samples in self- regulating magnetic hyperthermia

During the two year project, the scientists were able to test and improve the magnetic nanoparticles produced by IPR-NAS. Most notably, they managed to create laser-generated iron nanoparticles exhibiting significantly faster/better response to radio-frequency inductive heating in comparison to commercially available super-paramagnetic iron oxides (Fe3O4 from Endorem® with magnetisation 93 emu/g). This was thanks to the special structure of the nanoparticles (iron core/oxide shell with magnetisation 218 emu/g), which combined high magnetic properties with outstanding electrical conductivity.

Thanks to the scientists’ collaborative efforts, the new nanoparticles have been brought a step closer for use by oncologists as a non-invasive cellular treatment as well as a new MRI contrast agent.

Pilot Project with Belarus
The Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (BSUIR) has developed a chemical vapour deposition method for producing high quality ordered hybrid carbon nanotube (CNT) / graphene nanostructures where the graphene layers are allocated on the top of the arrays of vertically allied CNTs. BSUIR’s production process for these nanostructures takes several minutes instead of weeks. Their simple, low-cost, one-step process uses a volatile catalyst and is fully compatible with microelectronics production technology.

Based on these unique nanostructures, BSUIR’s CNT/graphene nanostacks demonstrate good electron conductivity, low diffusion resistance to protons/cations, easy electrolyte penetration, and high electroactive areas. Consequently, they represent promising candidates for the fabrication of high performance supercapacitors with superior specific electrical capacitance.

In order to bring the technology a step closer towards application in the clean energy sector, BSUIR needed the support of Cleancarb - a Luxembourg-based company specialised in energy storage systems for electric vehicles - to educate and train them in:

i) how best to integrate the electrodes into supercapacitor cells and
ii) how to perform and analyse comparative vehicle based tests using commercial supercapacitors with BSUIR’s hybrid CNT/graphene electrodes.

This would enable BSUIR to have a deeper understanding of the behaviour of the electrodes under typical operating conditions and prove their high performance, reliability and durability.

During his short term secondments to Cleancarb, Dmitry Grapov, a young BSUIR researcher, also visited several research centres in Luxembourg, as well as the company 4ESYS specialised in supercapacitor applications for automotive and industrial clients. This helped him to gain useful industrial insight that he was able to then utilise in producing the CNT electrodes. Meanwhile, during visits to Minsk, Peter Dooley, Cleancarb Managing Director, was trained in material synthesis for CNT electrodes and advised BSUIR on how to conduct supercapacitor electrical performance tests.

Over the course of the two year-project, the partners produced more than fifty electrodes made of ordered hybrid CNT/graphene nanostructures, and more than forty-five electrodes made of ordered hybrid CNT/graphene nanostructures. Samples of these electrodes were integrated into supercapacitors in order to make comparative performance tests with “off-the-shelf” industrial supercapacitors.

Although the results for specific electrical capacitance (0,6 F/g) proved slightly disappointing, the partners see potential to make major improvements by using laser patterning to improve the electrolyte access to deep layers of the CNT/graphene material, and direct metallic electrical connection to the CNT/graphene film.

Furthermore, the project has enabled the partners to identify a new application for BSUIR’s CNT/graphene material in the field of microelectronics. This requires further investigation thus creating room for future collaboration between BSUIR and Cleancarb.

Pilot Project with Georgia
Rare-earth metal compounds represent very promising materials to use in sensor elements for various types of photonics devices: communications, light and light sensor devices, imaging for safety & security, and optical sensors for high average and high peak power lasers. During the past 25+ years, the Georgian Technical University (GTU) has conducted research on light radiation sensors based on rare-earth metals and their compounds. Their research has principally focused on:

• Heterogeneous combination of elements to integrate higher levels of intelligence into multifunctional microsystems including multi-sensing, processing, wireless and wired communication, and/or actuation capabilities;
• Smart systems based on innovative nanosensor devices and components, providing unprecedented levels of performance and representing a disruptive approach to known or new challenges;
• Integration of multiple elements of the value chain of heterogeneous systems - materials, modelling, design, processes, devices, packaging, characterisation, testing - contributing to more efficient manufacturing.

In order to introduce GTU’s technology to the environmental monitoring sector, GTU needed Université Paris-Sud (PSUD) to educate and train them in:

i) nanomaterial preparation and measurement using picosecond laser technology for preparation of very thin nanofilms, and precise optical and magnetic properties measurement methods at liquid helium temperatures and
ii) testing methods for radiation nanosensors in hospitals, chemical and metallurgical factories for monitoring of different chemical, biological and other harmful substances.

GTU paid several visits to PSUD’s Laboratory of Chemical Physics, where they received training for the lab’s state-of-the-art facilities: ELYSE, used for investigating fast kinetics, and CLIO, a free-electron laser. In particular, they learnt how to perform sum frequency generation spectroscopy. During the visits, the GTU researchers performed over fifty experiments with the PSUD experts.

By exploiting PSUD’s advanced technical facilities and the combined knowledge of the Georgian and French experts, the partners discovered that significantly enhanced results could be obtained by producing boron 10 samples on aluminium substrates compared to silicon substrates. The partners aim to test the improved samples on different biological tissues in the near future.

Furthermore, the research results obtained during the course of the project were published in a number of international journals, including the American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics, as well as several conferences, including the International Conference on Diamond and Carbon Material.

Pilot Project with Ukraine
In recent years much development has focused on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as a source of clean electric power, because they are able to convert a wide variety of fuels and because they do so with such high efficiency (40-60% unassisted, up to 70% in pressurized hybrid system) compared to engines and modern thermal power plants (30-40% efficient). SOFC technology dominates competing fuel cell technologies because of the ability of SOFCs to use currently available fossil fuels, thus reducing operating costs. Also, SOFCs are attractive as energy sources because they are clean, reliable, and almost entirely non-polluting. Because there are no moving parts and the cells are therefore vibration-free, the noise pollution associated with power generation is also eliminated.

During the past 5+ years, Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (IPMS) has been conducting research to radically improve the ionic conductivity in zirconia electrolytes and the mechanical properties of SOFC. In particular, their work has focused on nano-sized SOFC materials sourced from Europe’s solitary zircon-sand deposit which is located in Ukraine. Their research has indicated an improvement by a factor of five in the ionic conductivity of zirconia may be achieved by combined use of Ukrainian 10-mol.% Sc2O3 – 1-mol.% CeO2 – stabilized zirconia powder, and electron beam physical vapour deposition technique for the dense electrolyte and diffusion barrier layers to be deposited on porous Ni-ZrO2 anode.

In order to bring the technology a step closer towards application in the clean energy sector, IPMS needed the support of the University of Birmingham (UB) to educate and train them in:

i) characterization of zirconia powders using Hg porosimeter and IS Impedance Analyser and
ii) long term performance tests to evaluate the SOFC with zirconia anodes.

This would enable IPMS to have a deeper understanding of the behaviour of the new SOFC electrolyte materials under typical operating conditions in order to prove their high performance, reliability and durability.

During his visits to UB, Dr. Yehor Brodnikovskyi, a young IPMS researcher, was trained on a variety of instruments used to manufacture, analyse and characterise SOFC utilising IPMS’ zirconia anodes. Similarly, Nikkia McDonald, a young UB researcher, spent time in Kyiv learning more about IPMS’ zirconia anodes. The IPMS and UB researchers obtained their best power density results by combining a NiO-10Sc1CeSZ anode with 10Sc1CeSZ electrolyte, gadolinia-doped ceria barrier layer, and LSCFGDC cathode in a single chamber SOFC.

Looking to the future, the partners hope to continue their collaboration on the anode technology via the EU’s Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking, which Ukrainian organisations are now eligible to participate in since 2015.

In quantitative terms, the four pilot projects produced the following:

• 70 zirconia anodes produced and tested by IPMS and UB.
• 100 electrodes made of ordered and disordered hybrid CNT/graphene nanostructures produced and tested by BSUIR and Cleancarb.
• 12 radiation sensor elements based on rare earth elements produced and tested by GTU and PSUD.
• 6 radiation sensor elements based on boron doped silicon nanostructures produced and tested by GTU and PSUD.
• 5 nanosensor devices - based on novel smart sensor systems - produced and tested by GTU and PSUD.
• 3.2g of ferromagnetic (Ni – Cu)/C nanocomposites produced and tested by IPR-NAS and LZH.
• 1.2g of superparamagnetic (Ni – Cu)/C nanocomposites produced and tested by IPR-NAS and LZH.

Furthermore, the pilot projects resulted in over 20 research papers being presented at international conferences (e.g. EMRS Fall Meetings 2015 and Nanotech France) or published in international journals (e.g. American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics, Nano and Journal of Electrochemical Science and Engineering).

IPMS and UB:
“Nucleation and Growth Mechanisms of Zirconia Film Deposited on Porous Nickel Oxide – Zirconia Substrate by Electron Beam – Physical Vapor Deposition”, O.Vasylyev M. Brychevskyi, Y. Brodnikovskyi et al., Advances in Ceramic Science and Engineering (ACSE). – 2014 (3) – p. 25-35.

“Microstructural changes in NiO–ScSZ composite following reduction processes in pure and diluted hydrogen”, M. Andrzejczuk, O. Vasylyev, Y. Brodnikovskyi et al., Materials Characterization. – 2014 (87). – p. 159-165.

“Anode materials for solid oxide fuel cell application”, Brodnikovskyi Y., Powder metallurgy, 3/4 (501) 2015, p. 65-75 (in Ukrainian).

“Optimization of physicomechanical properties of anode material for fuel cell”, Vasyliv B.D. Podhurska V.Ya. Brodnikovskyi Y., Physicochemical mechanical of materials, 2015, 51 (№1), p. 7-12 (in Ukrainian)

“Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Materials”, Y. Brodnikovskyi, Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics: Volume 54, Issue 3 (2015), Page 166-174.

“Influence of reduction conditions of NiO on its mechanical and electrical properties”, Y. Brodnikovskyi, B. Vasyliv, V. Podhurska, M. Andrzejczuk, N. McDonald, O. Kyrpa, O. Ostash, O. Vasylyev, R. Steinberger-Wilckens, M. M. Lewandowska, J. Electrochem. Sci. Eng. X (20YY) pp-pp; (Submitted).

BSUIR:
“Self–organised hybrid nanostructures composed of the array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and planar graphene multilayer” published in the International Journal of Nanotechnology, Volume 11, Number 1–4/2014, Pages 230-242, DOI 10.1504/IJNT.2014.059825.

“Simulation of nanoelectronic devices based on carbon nanomaterials”, Abramov I.I. Kolomejtseva N.V.,Labunov V.A. Romanova I.A. published in the Proceedings of 4th International Scientific Conference “Nanostructured materials – 2014: Belarus – Russia – Ukraine”, 7-10 October 2014, Minsk p.283.

“Simulation of functionally-integrated structures based on carbon nanotubes”, Abramov I.I. Kolomejtseva N.V.,Labunov V.A. Romanova I.A. Basaev A.S published in the Journal of Nano and Microsystem Technique, 2014 №5 p.11-14.

“Current limits and morphology changes of entangled CNTs on various catalyst patches”, K. Korzun, A. Tymoshchyk, I. Kashko, B. Shulitski, P. Serbun, G. Müller, published in the Proceedings of 27th International Nanoelectronic Conference (IVNC14), 6-10 July 2014, Engelberg, Switzerland.

“Complexes of carbon nanotubes with oligonucleotides in thin Langmuir-Blodgett films to detect electrochemically hybridization”, A S Egorov, V P Egorova, H V Krylova, I V Lipnevich, T I Orekhovskaya, A A Veligura, M I Govorov and B G Shulitsky, published in the Proceeding of 1st International School and Conference on Optoelectronics, Photonics, Engineering and Nanostructures, 25 - 27 March 2014, St. Petersburg, Russia, Pp. 142-144.

“Problems in obtaining high emission current densities for matrix field emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes”, V.Labunov B.Shulitski A.Tymoshchyk E.Tamashevich N.Kargin G.Muller P.Serbun presented at the International Conference "Trends in Nanotechnology (TNT)", 29-31 January 2014, Tokyo, Japan.

“Manifestation of coherent magnetic anisotropy in a carbon nanotube matrix with low ferromagnetic nanoparticle content”, A L Danilyuk, I V Komissarov, V A Labunov, F Le Normand, A Derory, J M Hernandez, J Tejada, S L Prischepa, New Journal of Physics 02/2015; 17(2):023073. DOI:10.1088/1367-2630/17/2/023073 · 3.67 Impact Factor.

“Chapter: Magnetic Properties of Nanocomposites Based on Magnetically Functionalized Carbon Nantotubes”, S. L. Prischepa, A.L. Danilyuk, A.L. Prudnikava, I.V. Komissarov, V.A. Labunov, K.I. Yanushkevich, F. Le Normand, Nanomagnetism, Edited by Julian Maria Gonzalez Estevez, 11/2014: chapter 9: pages 227-245; One Central Press (OCP)., ISBN: 9781910086056.

GTU and PSUD:
“Study of novel technologies for preparation of nanostructured pellets and thin films”, presented at the International Conference on Clean Energy ICCE-2014, 8-12 June 2014, Istanbul, Turkey.

“Development of novel optical sensory systems for nanobio applications”, presented at International Conference eRA 9 – Synenergy Forum, 22-24 September 2014, Athens, Greece.

“Novel Approaches to Nanosensory Systems Development”, P. J. Kervalishvili, American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics, 5(1), (2015), 1-9.

“Development of Boron-10 isotope enriched Graphene based neutron sensors”, Paata Kervalishvili, Vladimir Labunov, Evangelos Hristoforou, Mehran Mostafavi, Hans Stroeher, Panos Yannakopoulos, International Conference on Diamond and Carbon Materials, 6-10 September 2015, Bad Homburg, Germany.

IPR-NAS and LZH:
“Preparation and investigation of magnetic nanoparticles, prepared by solid state pyrolysis”, Manukyan. A, Journal of Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, 20 March 2014, Armenia.

“Magnetic properties of carbon-coated Ni nanoparticles prepared by solid-phase pyrolysis of nickel-phthalocyanine”, Sajti. L and Manukyan. A, vol.10 Journal “Nano” (World Scientific).

“Magnetic hyperthermia. Nanoparticles will help to treat the cancer”, Sajti. L and Manukyan. A, vol.2 World of Science (Arm. Academy of Sciences).

Potential Impact:
The NANOMAT-EPC project was expected to achieve the following potential impacts:

I. Support the development and promotion of concrete projects making the benefits of new technologies
II. Contribute towards the United Nations Millennium Development Goals
III. Contribute towards building and strengthening of science in low and middle-income countries through entrepreneurship

We now step through each of these one-by-one.

I. Support the development and promotion of concrete projects making the benefits of new technologies
The four concrete pilot projects based on novel technologies and developments helped contribute this potential impact.

The pilot project with Ukraine - involving IPMS and UB - developed high conductivity zirconia anodes for solid oxide fuel cells, which can help generate clean electric power with high efficiency.

The pilot project with Belarus - involving BSUIR and Cleancarb - developed electrodes made of hybrid CNT/graphene for supercapacitors, which can help to store more energy due to the electrodes’ high energy density.

The pilot project with Georgia – involving GTU and PSUD – developed nanosensory devices for environmental monitoring using picosecond laser technology, which have higher sensitivity for the detection of chemicals and harmful substances in multiple types of environments.

The pilot project with Armenia – involving IPR-NAS and LZH - developed nanoparticles with self-regulating magnetic hyperthermia properties, which can be used for oncology and as contrast-agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

II. Contribute towards the United Nations Millennium Development Goals

NANOMAT-EPC contributed to four out of the eight Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) directly or indirectly.

II.1 Towards the goal of promoting gender equality and empowering women, specifically 3.2 Share of women in wage employment in the non-agricultural sector , NANOMAT-EPC contributed by having high-level, salaried female experts from the research and industry sectors.

II.2 Towards the goal of combating HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases, the project contributed by setting up a pilot project in Armenia, which aimed to develop magnetic nanoparticles for treating cancer patients.

II.3 Towards the goal of Ensure environmental sustainability, the project contributed by setting up pilot projects in Ukraine and Belarus, which aimed to develop clean energy.

II.4 Towards the goal of Developing global partnership for development, the project contributed by setting up European and EPC partnerships for development and enhanced networking between those countries.

III. Contribute towards building and strengthening of science in low and middle-income countries through entrepreneurship

One of the main aims of this project was to assist Armenia, Belarus, Georgia and Ukraine regarding their low number of spin offs and innovative SMEs. Firstly, this was supported by mapping their organisations active in nano- and materials science and organising networking events in their countries. This helped new relations to be established between industry and academia. Secondly, the consortium published a report on nano- and materials knowledge and technology transfer opportunities in EPC with recommendations for the RTD community, private industry, government and EC.

Meanwhile, the project’s main dissemination activities included:

• Production of a project website (www.nanomat-epc.eu) that was made available in English and Russian from early January 2014. The website was regularly updated with news and relevant events. During Period 2 (Nov 2014 – Oct 2015), the website received 2329 unique visitors.

• Production of a NANOMAT-EPC project leaflet (A4 size, double sided) and NANOMAT-EPC project poster (A1 size) that were distributed during related events and conferences.

• Production of three project newsletters over the course of the project that were distributed to the NANOMAT-EPC email distribution list (120+ members) and announced on several LinkedIn interest groups e.g. Nanomaterials Group.

The consortium made considerable efforts to advertise the project using the promotion materials and project results via the following events:

• BSUIR presented the project during ”Trends in Nanotechnology (TNT)” in Tokyo (29-31 January 2014);
• BSUIR presented the project during a broadcast by the First Belarusian TV Channel (January 2014);
• Intelligentsia published an article about the project in the newsletter of the Luxembourg Materials Cluster (10 February 2014);
• GTU distributed project leaflets during “Tbilisi Spring 2014: Nuclear Radiation Nanosensors and Nanosensory Systems" funded by NATO Science for Peace (6-9 March 2014);
• Cleancarb displayed the project poster during CeBIT in Hannover (10-14 March 2014);
• UB displayed the project poster and distributed 140 leaflets during the 10th International Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Conference in Birmingham (26-27 March 2014);
• BSUIR presented the project during the 4th international conference “Micro- and nanoelectronics in micro- and nanosystem technology”, MIET, Moscow, Russia (27-28 March 2014);
• IPMS distributed 50 project leaflets during the Bi-annual Industrial Technologies Conference in Athens (9-11 April 2014);
• UB displayed the project poster and distributed 150 leaflets during the 11th European SOFC and SOE Forum, Lucerne, Switzerland (1-4 July 2014);
• Cleancarb presented the project during Transnanoforum, Nancy, France (10 Sept 2014);
• BSUIR presented the project during the 21st National Interuniversity Scientific Conference "Microelectronics and Computer Science" in Moscow (23-25 April 2014);
• IPMS distributed 50 leaflets during the International conference "Powder Metallurgy: its development and future", Kyiv, Ukraine (22-24 May 2014);
• IPMS distributed 50 leaflets during the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) Fall Meeting 2014, Warsaw, Poland (15-18 Sept 2014);
• LZH presented the project during the international QuantArm 2014 Conference, Tsaghkadzor, Armenia (23 September 2014);
• BSUIR presented the project during the conference ”Micro- and Nanoelectronics - 2014”, Moscow-Zvenigorod , Russia (6-10 October 2014);
• IPR-NAS displayed the project poster during the 4th scientific conference of the Armenian Chemical Society (8 October 2014);
• GTU presented the project during the 3rd International Conference "Nanotechnologies - Nano 2014”, Tbilisi, Georgia (20-24 October 2014).
• IPMS distributed project leaflets during the Brokerage Event for Science and Technologies (BEST) in NMPB, Brussels (13 November 2014);
• IPMS presented the NANOMAT-EPC project during the event SICA call- EaP countries: Assessment and Clustering Workshop, Kyiv, Ukraine (10 March 2015);
• IPR-NAS organised internal seminars concerning their pilot-project results (10 November 2014, 5 March 2015 and 23 April 2015);
• GTU presented the NANOMAT-EPC project during the general meeting of the EuroMediterranean Academy of Arts and Sciences in Athens (11 March 2015);
• Intelligentsia (Giles Brandon) presented the NANOMAT-EPC pilot-projects to the European Parliament’s Committee on Foreign Affairs during the conference "Building Knowledge-oriented and Forward-looking Neighbourhood: Developing a Common Knowledge and Innovation Space" (31 March 2015, European Parliament, Brussels, Belgium). A video of his presentation can be seen here.
• BSUIR presented their pilot-project results to JSC Integral in Minsk (7 April 2015);
• Cleancarb displayed a project poster during the Hannover Fair (16 April 2015);
• BSUIR presented their pilot-project results to the Institute of Physics of Solids and Semiconductors (IPSS) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus (17 April 2015);
• BSUIR presented their pilot-project results to the Presidium of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus (23 April 2015);
• Cleancarb displayed a project poster during the conference “Energy Harvesting and Storage Europe” in Berlin (28 April 2015);
• GTU presented their pilot-project results at the 7th International Conference on Information Technology (ICIT 2015) in Amman, Jordan (12-15 May 2015);
• UB displayed a project poster and distributed project leaflets during the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technical Conference (FCH2 2015), Birmingham, UK (19-21 May 2015);
• IPR-NAS presented their pilot-project results at Current Trends in Cancer Theranostics (CTCT – 2015), Jena, Germany (1-3 June 2015);
• IPMS presented their pilot-project results at the Regional Symposium on Electrochemistry-South East Europe in Pravets, Bulgaria (7-11 June 2015);
• LZH presented their pilot-project results at TechConnect World Innovation Conference and Expo, Washington DC, USA (14-17 June 2015);
• IPR-NAS presented their pilot-project results at Nanotech France - 2015, Paris, France (14-17 June 2015);
• Cleancarb displayed a project poster during the Automotive testing expo in Stuttgart (18 June 2015);
• BSUIR presented their pilot-project results at an IMEC International Meeting, Brussels (21-23 June 2015);
• IPMS distributed project leaflets during the EMRS Fall Meetings 2015, Warsaw (15-18 Sept 2015);
• GTU presented their pilot-project results at the International Conference on Diamond and Carbon Materials, Bad Homburg, Germany (6-10 September 2015);
• GTU presented their pilot-project results at the Synenergy Forum (eRA 10) in Athens (23-25 September 2015);
• IPMS distributed project leaflets and promotion guides during the HighMatTech conference, Kyiv, Ukraine (6-7 October 2015);
• GTU presented their pilot-project results at the International Conference on Advanced materials and technologies in Tbilisi (21-23 October 2015);
• BSUIR presented their pilot-project results at SEMICON 2015, Dresden (5-8 October 2015);
• BSUIR presented their pilot-project results at the Congress of Belarusian Physicists, Minsk, Belarus (28-30 October 2015).

From the perspective of exploitation of results, the main route has been to seek further EU funding (i.e. Horizon 2020) since the results of the pilot projects were still relatively early stage (i.e. technology readiness level 3-5).

• Seven H2020 proposals were submitted involving eight consortium partners.
• The H2020 Marie Curie RISE proposal INTELUM – involving IPR-NAS and Intelligentsia – was selected for funding and started in March 2015.

List of Websites:
www.nanomat-epc.eu
Giles Brandon
Managing Director
Intelligentsia Consultants Sarl
Tel: +352 26394233
Email: contact@intelligentsia-consultants.com