Skip to main content

Emotional attributions of climate change

Objective

It is now clear that managers, and their organisations, are under increasing pressure to respond to environmental issues, and to climate change in particular. Research has identified the important role that individuals play in affecting organisational change, yet more remains to be done. Despite past success of cognitive and behavioural perspectives in explaining proenvironmental behaviours, few researchers have explored its affective dimensions. The lack of affective research on environmental issues in organisations has meant that there is a lack of understanding of how emotion might affect behaviour, particularly in response to environmental issues. This proposal aims to inform this research area and identifies three key objectives to advance the state of the art by: (1) furthering understanding of the relationship between climate change attributions and emotional reactions; (2) furthering understanding of the relationship between emotional reactions to climate change and subsequent decision-making and behavioural responses; and (3) evaluating how emotions affect climate change responses over long-term change programs in organisations.
The research programme described in this proposal will provide a significant move forward in the state of the art. Each objective is interrelated to the others and provides a coherent work programme that can be successfully completed over the course of the CIG award. These objectives will overcome significant limitations of past research and provide a strong platform for future research. Furthermore, the results of this research will be directly relevant to industry and will inform the ESRC’s strategic priority of influencing behaviour and informing interventions.

Call for proposal

FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG
See other projects for this call

Coordinator

UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS
Address
Woodhouse Lane
LS2 9JT Leeds
United Kingdom
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
EU contribution
€ 100 000
Administrative Contact
Benjamin Williams (Mr.)