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MigrAtion Governance and asYlum Crises

Periodic Reporting for period 2 - MAGYC (MigrAtion Governance and asYlum Crises)

Reporting period: 2019-11-01 to 2021-04-30

Since the beginning of the ‘refugee crisis’ in 2015, different policy responses have been put forward by governments and international organisations. Albeit very different from one another, these responses have two common traits: they were generally presented as the sole realistic solution to a situation that was often characterized as ‘unsustainable’, and they were often geared towards a more efficient control and surveillance of the borders.

Therefore, MAGYC seeks to assess how migration governance has responded to the recent “refugee crises” and has since been influenced by it, and how crises at large shape policy responses to migration.

This overall objective shall be fulfilled through the pursuit of different specific objectives:
Objective 1: Reflect on policy gaps in migration governance, using innovative policy analysis methods.
Objective 2: Develop indicators of migration governance by correlating policy evaluation with migration dynamics (flow of asylum seekers, number of returnees, etc.).
Objective 3: Understand the articulation between migration dynamics and policy responses.
Objective 4: Offer a dynamic analysis of policy-making, focusing on knowledge and policy discrepancies, cognitive gaps in policymaking and points of contention.
Objective 5: Propose avenues for the development of innovative migration governance by offering new perspectives that break away from path dependency.
Obj 1: A reflection on policy gaps in migration governance using innovative policy analysis methods was carried out from different angles. Relevant outputs were a working paper on the Turkey-EU Refugee Deal; a paper on the EU-Lebanon Compact; a working paper on the construction of the crisis-invasion discourse by different stakeholders in Italy; a broad literature study on multi-scalar policy practices in relation to migration and integration within the EU. Research conducted on IDPs and cross-border movement in Yemen presented new data and analysis of policy gaps on this dimension, with relevance to several objectives of the project (Objs 1, 3, 4, 5), and included several outputs, including a report, and a policy paper, and dissemination of key findings.

Obj 2: The development of indicators of migration governance included the collection and harmonization of datasets for inter-operability and the calculation of correlations between long-term trends and migration dynamics, corresponding to two initial milestones of the project. Among the outputs, a methodological paper on the correlations between long-term trends and migration dynamics, that set the base for three submitted working papers providing various contributions on quantifying ‘crisis’ and the role of drivers; a working paper on the Turkey-EU refugee deal; finally, a map of asylum seekers’ sites addressing data gaps in mapping refugees’ and asylum seekers’ concentrations.

Obj 3: A wide range of outputs contributes to the understanding of the articulation between migration dynamics and policy responses. A framework paper on the relation between EU migration governance and a ‘crisis’ discourse; a paper on EU-Egypt partnership and a paper on the Jordan Compact; a framework paper offering a critical analysis of migration 'as crisis' discourses and policies; a special issue proposal on migration crisis; a policy brief and a working paper on asylum management at the local level in Italy, as well as two conference papers on asylum and ‘crisis’ and the governance of asylum in Italy; an analysis of Turkish perceptions of the EU migration deal through parliamentary debates; a framework paper on the perceptions of two major migration deals; a policy brief on forced migration from Eritrea and a policy brief on forced migration in Jordan and Lebanon, both also contributing to Objs 4 and 5; seven case studies focused on housing policies of asylum seekers in Europe; a paper on externalization policies and their impacts on migrant and refugee flows, and a policy brief on key policy trends on externalization policies were submitted to the EC.

Obj 4: Several outputs contribute to a dynamic analysis of policymaking: a working paper on the Jordan Compact, a special issue submission on migration crisis, the production of three policy briefs and a report, a policy paper and dissemination of key findings on Yemen.

Obj 5: Among the outputs proposing avenues for the development of innovative migration governance, the project produced a paper on European externalization policies and a migration crisis imaginary analyzing the cases of Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey; three policy briefs; a report, a policy paper and dissemination of key findings on Yemen.
Since the beginning of the project, 47 deliverables have been produced, of which 31 scientific deliverables, and 12 milestones have been achieved.

The scientific results include a variety of outputs tackling various aspects and dimensions of migration governance and 'crisis'. Scientific outputs include 21 papers and reports, of which five are framework/methodological/literature review papers; two conference papers; four policy briefs with policy recommendations; three workshops among project partners; a map of asylum seekers’ sites; and a special issue submission on ‘migration-as-crisis’, to be published in 2022.

These outputs provide a contribution to the understanding of the correlation between ‘refugee crises’ and policy responses to migration, filling up blind spots of migration governance, with an expected relevant social and policy impacts at various levels: the proposal of innovative migration policies; the engagement of new stakeholders into the policy-making process, and a dynamic analysis of the efficiency of migration policies and externalization.

Upcoming action will include the continuation of research activities and of the production of scientific outputs as well as the continuation of the effort in dissemination and exploitation of the project results, already ongoing. The project will produce two special issues submissions, as well as a joint volume gathering the key results of the project. Dissemination of findings will continue at various levels and fora, and addressing diverse audiences (both academic and non-academic), and will include a workshop in a study region and the proceedings of an international conference to present key results of the project.
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