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Sexual Selection and Sleep in Arctic Shorebirds

Project description

Why do males have most offspring when they don't snooze?

Dozens of species of shorebirds breed in the Arctic. Each year, millions of these birds migrate from Central and South America to spend the summer in the Arctic and raise their offspring. Studies show that some male shorebirds strongly reduce sleep during the breeding season, and that those that sleep the least have the most offspring. The EU-funded SSIAS project will explore how mating behaviour affects reproductive success in Arctic shorebirds. It will focus on two species: polygynous pectoral sandpipers, and sex role-reversed red phalaropes. Specifically, it will use state-of-the-art accelerometers, machine learning models and conventional field methods to investigate whether the duration and frequency of courtship and territorial behaviours predict the number of sired offspring, and whether and how these behaviours vary with time spent awake.

Coordinator

MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV
Net EU contribution
€ 174 806,40
Address
Hofgartenstrasse 8
80539 Munchen
Germany

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Region
Bayern Oberbayern München, Kreisfreie Stadt
Activity type
Research Organisations
Other funding
€ 0,00