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SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES, NIR, NMR, FTIR FOR RAPID FOOD QUALITY ASSESSMENT

Objective

The aim of the action is to provide rapid, instrumental food quality measurement techniques to satisfy consumer/industrial needs in Europe.
Research is being carried out to provide rapid, instrumental food quality measurement techniques to satisfy consumer and industrial needs in Europe.
A deeper understanding of the instrumental signals, combined with the development of techniques for modifying and combining their feeding back to enable optimization of instrumental and experimental design, will provide the best data as a basis for the dissemination of information.

A standard spectral exchange format has been published based on JCAMP and a computer programme has been produced to enable a catalogue of spectral sources to be produced (ie the source and its nature are recorded and it will be up to the 'owner' of the spectra to supply them to an enquirer). This registry will be set up at Agricultural and Food Development Authority (TEAGASC) in Dublin and will be availabe online at Campden Food and Drink Research Association (CFDRA) in the United Kingdom. The setting up of an actual spectral database still requires further work.
This will be achieved by the following:

Signal interpretation to interpret, define, process and quantify instrumental signals in order to understand and justify signal/quality relationships;

Mathematical treatment/interpretation of instrumental data to modify signals and combine signal data from different instrument types, in order to relate the signal to food quality characteristics.

Instrument and experimental design to optimise instrumental and experimental design for measurement of food quality;

The production of a standardised spectral exchange format to enable the exchange and valid comparisons of instrumental spectra;

The establishment of an information base about available spectra and the construction of a spectral database containing the actual spectra data.

Thus, a deeper understanding of the instrumental signals, combined with the development of techniques for modifying and combining their feeding back to enable optimisation of instrumental and experimental design, will provide the best data as a basis for the dissemination of information.

Coordinator

Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association (CCFRA)
Address
Station Road
GL55 6LD Chipping Campden
United Kingdom