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PHYSIOLOGICAL IMPLICATION OF THE CONSUMPTION OF RESISTANT STARCH IN MAN 'EURESTA'

Objective

The objectives of the concerted action can be summarized in the following points:

1. What is the best way to measure and characterize various forms of resistant starch (RS) in various foods and raw materials?

2. What is the content of RS in present western diets?

3. To what an extent is the molecular structure of RS universal or variable and dependent on the source of starch, processing conditions, amylose/amylopectin ratio etc?

4. What are the physicochemical and physiological similarities and differences between RS and fermentable dietary fibre?

5. How does RS from various sources affect human physiology: blood cholesterol, lipoproteins, gastrointestinal function (anticonstipation, gas formation, diarrhoea) absorption of other nutrients, risk of colon cancer, atherosclerosis, diabetes and energy content?

6. If RS appears beneficial for health, how can the consumption be raised by production of foods with increased RS content?

7. How should foods containing RS be labelled to guide the consumer?
In 1982 a new starch fraction was discovered which was called 'resistant starch' (RS). This starch fraction appeared to be indigestible in the small intestine but was readily fermented by large bowel microorganisms. It is now clear that this type of RS is only one of several forms of starch that is indigestible in the small intestine. Certain raw starch granules and physically enclosed starch are other forms under investigation.

Research has been carried out with respect to:
definition, analysis, physical properties, chemical properties, epidemiology;
technology on RS production;
effects on upper intestinal tract;
effects on lower intestinal tract;
energy contribution of RS (2 subgroups on thermogenesis in man and small animal studies)
In 1982 a new starch fraction was discovered which was called resistant starch (RS). This starch fraction appeared to be indigestible in the small intestine but was readily fermented by large bowel microorganisms. RS is formed in limited amounts at bread baking, at the processing of traditional cornflakes and especially by repeated wet autoclaving. RS from wheat consists of retrograded amylose. It is now clear, however, that this type of RS is only one of several forms of starch that is indigestible in the small intestine. Certain raw starch granules and physically enclosed starch are other forms under investigation.

Coordinator

University of Lund
Address
Po Box 124
22100 Lund
Sweden