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MICROSTRUCTURE AND TEXTURE CONTROL OF HEXAGONAL SHEET ALLOYS-ROLE OF ALLOYING ELEMENTS ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND FORMABILITY

Objective


There is considerable evidence to show that variations in microstructure and texture result in considerable scatter in the mechanical properties and formability of currently produced titanium alloys. These alloys are not therefore used as efficiently as they could be and this project is aimed at rectifying this situation by addressing the following objectives: the identification of which aspects of microstructure and texture most critically affect properties; and the proposing of ways of producing these materials so that controlled microstructure and textures which must reduce scatter in properties can be produced consistently and economically. Such information could be used in the future production of all existing and new titanium alloys. The work is viewed as the first phase of a long term programme. This initial phase concentrates on an in depth characterisation of the microstructures and textures of the alpha phases and the beta phases of titanium both individually and collectively, for a series of model alloys as a function of cold rolling of small laboratoryproduced ingots to thin sheet and their subsequent recrystallisation. This microstructural characterisation will be accompanied by the development of models to predict accurately the observed deformation, fracture and recrystallisation behaviour. To increase the basic understanding of deformation in hexagonal metals, equivalent studies will also be carried out on magnesium and zinc. Subsequent phases of the work, for which a separate proposal will be made later, would employ hot and cold rolling and the scale up to larger ingots through cooperation with the European titanium industry.
There is considerable evidence to show that variations in microstructure and texture result in considerable scatter in the mechanical properties and formability of currently-produced titanium alloys. These alloys are not therefore used as efficiently as they could be and this proposal is aimed at rectifying this situation by addressing the following objectives: the identification of which aspects of microstructure and textures which must reduce scatter in properties can be produced consistently and economically. Such information could be used in the future production of all existing and new titanium alloys.
The work is viewed as the first phase of a long-term programme. This initial phase will concentrate on an in-depth characterization of the microstructures and textures of the alpha and the beta phases of titanium both individually and collectively, for a series of model alloys as a function of cold-rolling of small laboratory-produced ingots to thin sheet and their subsequent recrystallization.
This microstructural characterization will be accompanied by the development of models to predict accurately the observed deformation, fracture and recrystallization behaviour. To increase the basic understanding of deformation in hexagonal metals, equivalent studies will also be carried out on magnesium and zinc. Subsequent phases of the work, for which a separate proposal will be made later, would employ hot and cold rolling and the scale-up to larger ingots through cooperation with the European Titanium industry.

Coordinator

LABORATOIRE DE METALLURGIE LM2P
Address
Ile Du Saulcy
57045 Metz
France

Participants (6)

INSTITUT FÜR METALLKUNDE UND METALLPHYSIK
Germany
KATHOLIEKE UNIVERSITEIT LEUVEN
Belgium
ROYAL AIRCRAFT ESTABLISHMENT
UNIVERSIDAD DE NAVERRA
Spain
UNIVERSITE DE METZ
France
Address
Ile-du-saulcy
57012 Metz
École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne
France
Address
158 Cours Fauriel
42023 Saint-étienne