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New means to promote pedestrian traffic in cities

Exploitable results

A guidebook for support designers, planners and decision makers to promote walking in cities by improving the conditions and quality of urban pedestrian environments has been produced as part of the PROMPT project. The basic approach has been to avoid finding partial solutions before becoming acquainted with all the problems inherent to the situation under examination, because the best results generally can be obtained if all the inherent problems are solved at the same time (some problems are more or less independent so that sometimes also partial solutions can be successful). This approach has led to the identification of the prevailing problems in pedestrian environments, which have been analysed according to aspects such as safety, accessibility, comfort, attractiveness, intermodality, and implementation. The main solutions to these problems are included in the guidebook. So the users can find in this guidebook proper solutions to specific problems; most of them are current best practice examples, but there are also new and innovative solutions. The main clusters of problems for which holistic and coherent solution have been found are: - lack of or scarce offer of physical and social space; - lack of equipment and services in outdoor spaces; - interference with motor vehicles; - poor support by PT and connection to other modes of transport; - poor natural, architectonic and psychological features of the environment; - poor environmental performance.
A guidebook to support designers, planners and decision-makers in their efforts to promote walking in cities by improving the conditions and quality of urban pedestrian environments has been produced as part of the Prompt project. The basic idea behind the project was to avoid finding partial solutions before becoming acquainted with all the problems inherent in the situation in question. For example, the construction of overpasses or underpasses can keep pedestrians safe from busy or high speed vehicle traffic, but may also raise significant crime, drainage, lighting and maintenance issues. The best results can generally be obtained if all the interdependent problems are solved at the same time. Nevertheless, some problems are more or less independent and partial solutions can also be successful. Therefore, all the problems identified in pedestrian environments were grouped into clusters with the aim of finding general solutions to these clusters of problems. The methods employed in the analyses of problems identified were not only technical, such as mapping, measurements and collection of statistics, but also individual-oriented, such as questionnaires, interviews and round tables with experts. The aim was to illuminate each problem from different points of view, including safety, accessibility, comfort, attractiveness, and intermodality. The main problems revealed through these analyses are included in the guidebook released to help find proper solutions to specific problems. Most of the solutions proposed are common and best practices, but there are also new and innovative solutions. The main clusters of problems for which holistic and coherent solutions have been found are: - lack of physical and social space; - lack of equipment and services in outdoor spaces; - interference between motor vehicles and pedestrians; - poor connectivity between different modes of transport; - lack of natural and architectonic features that can ensure the desired level of psychological comfort in pedestrian environments; - poor environmental performance.