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Building confidence in deep disposal : the borehole injection sites at tomsk-7 and krasnoyarsk-26

Deliverables

This result will be a demonstration of the ability of commonly used speciation codes to predict saturation concentrations and speciation of radionuclides in ground waters at Krasnoyarsk-26 and Tomsk-7. This result will be used by radioactive waste management organisations, regulators and decision makers in the consideration of the safety of deep disposal of radioactive waste throughout the EU. In particular, This Result will build confidence in radionuclide transport and speciation models, build confidence that laboratory investigations can adequately parameterise solubility and retardation and identify uncertainties and new modelling requirements.
This result may be used by radioactive waste management organisations, regulators and decision makers in the consideration of the safety of deep disposal of radioactive waste throughout the EU. Radioactive waste disposal organisations and their supporting contractors will be able to apply the results of the project in future performance assessments (PAs). Regulators will be able to use the results in evaluating safety assessment methodologies. In particular, it may be used to test the ability of PA codes to predict the transport of radionuclides in different sedimentary lithologies. At present we envision a variety of potential PA applications of the results of BORIS Phase I by radioactive waste management organisations and regulators, including the use of the database to test radionuclide transport and speciation models, provide constraints on the radionuclide transport properties of clays and sandstones, evaluate the potential of colloids and micro-organisms to enhance the transport of radionuclides, and testing and validation of PA codes.
Safety assessments of underground repositories for radioactive waste disposal require an understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere, including consideration of radionuclide speciation, transport and retardation in ground waters. However, in the West, there are virtually no localities where the geo-chemical behaviour of many of the radionuclides found in high-level and intermediate-level waste (HLW and ILW), such as Pu, Tc, Np, Am, Tc, Sr and Cs may be studied in the deep geological environment. This result has provided samples of natural groundwater from the injection sites containing variable concentrations of radionuclides. At present we envision a variety of potential market applications of the results of chemical analyis of these samples. Results will be of interest to radioactive waste management organisations and regulators, who may use the data to test radionuclide transport and speciation models and test PA codes. The samples themselves may be subjected to further analysis in the future. The result will also be of great interests to academic researchers interested in the chemical behaviour of radionuclides in the natural environment. We therefore expect some of the results to be disseminated via the open scientific literature.
The BORIS database provides a unique record of the behaviour and migration of radionuclides in the geosphere over long time periods. It is anticipated that the data held in the BORIS database will provide a unique resource for use within the radioactive waste management sector and also by other industries utilising or considering the deep injection of wastes. Radioactive waste disposal organisations will be able to apply Result #1 in future performance assessments (PAs). Regulators will be able to use developing guidelines and evaluating safety assessment methodologies. The results will build confidence that laboratory investigations can adequately parameterise solubility and retardation and identify uncertainties and new modelling requirements. Repository safety assessments require an understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere, including radionuclide speciation, transport and retardation in ground waters. Modern PAs are based on simplified models using parameters that are mostly obtained from small-scale, short-term laboratory experiments. Longer time-scale information may also be obtained from natural analogue studies, but often the range of radionuclides that can be studied is restricted, and uncertain assumptions have to be made about initial conditions. In comparison, the histories of the Russian injection sites are better constrained and a wide range of radionuclides is present. We envision a variety of potential future market applications, following the conclusion of BORIS Phase 1, including testing radionuclide transport and speciation models and codes, providing constraints on the radionuclide transport properties of clays and sandstones, evaluation of the potential of colloids and micro-organisms to enhance the transport of radionuclides, and testing and validation of PA models and codes.
Safety assessments of underground repositories for radioactive waste disposal require an understanding of the behaviour of radionuclides in the geosphere, including consideration of radionuclide speciation, transport and retardation. However, in the West there are virtually no localities where the geochemical behaviour of many of the radionuclides found in high-level and intermediate-level waste (HLW and ILW), such as Pu, Tc, Np, Am, Tc, Sr and Cs may be studied in the deep geological environment. This result has provided direct measurement of the sorption characteristics of the main Krasnoyarsk-26 disposal horizon. Sorption experiments made at room temperature and pressure have been compared with the same experiments performed at elevated pressure and temperature to simulate the conditions in the disposal horizon. Experimental sorption data may be compared with the database and natural radionuclide behaviour. At present we envision a variety of potential applications by radioactive waste management organisations and regulators, including providing constraints on the radionuclide transport properties of clays and sandstones, and documentation of the effect of pressure and temperature on sorption behaviour. This result will also be of great interest to academic researchers interested in the chemical behaviour of radionuclides in the natural environment. We therefore expect some of the results to be disseminated via the open scientific literature.

Publications

Building confidence in deep disposal: the borehole injection sites at Krasnoyarsk-26 and Tomsk-7 (BORIS)

Author(s): WICKHAM S (Galson Sciences Ltd (GB)), GALSON D (Galson Sciences Ltd (GB)), WHITE M (Galson Sciences Ltd (GB)), SILLEN X (SCK-CEN (BE)), WANG L (SCK-CEN (BE)), MARIVOET J (SCK-CEN (BE)), BEAUCAIRE C (IRSN (FR)), BOURGEOIS M (IRSN (FR)), ARTINGER R ET AL (FZK (DE)), BERNHARD G ET AL (FZR (DE)), KAMNEV E (VNIPIPT (RU)), OKUNKOV G (SCC (RU)), RYBALCHENKO A (SCC (RU)), ZUBKOV A (IEM RAS (RU)), ARANOVICH L (IPC RAS (RU)), GRAPHCHIKOV A (IPC RAS (RU)), KAIMIN E (UPC (ES)), ZAKHAROVA E (UPC (ES)), CASAS I ET AL (Environment Agency (GB)), DAVISON J, DUERDEN S
Published in: EUR 20165 (2003), pp.132. Euro: 20.50, 2003, Page(s) 132, ISBN 92-894-5066-5

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