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Laboratory and field methods for determination of bromate in drinking water

Objective

A large part of distributed waters for human consumption must be efficiently and frequently controlled A 10 ug 1{-1}, regulatory standard for bromate in drinking water as proposed in the new Directive for water intended for human consumption, requires an analytical method with a detection level of at least 2.5 ug 1{-1} (25% of the parametric value). Few water analysis laboratories with statutory function in Europe have demonstrated an ability to determine bromate in drinking water at the ug 1{-1} level.
Research, therefore, is urgently needed to meet the following objectives:
1. To improve the current laboratory-based method, ion chromatography with conductimetric detection for determination of bromate in raw and potable waters in compliance with the proposed new European Directive of 10 ug 1{-1} to make the method more robust user friendly and less subject to specific interferences and to insure determination capability at the ug 1{-1} level.
2. To develop alternative laboratory based methods for determination of bromate in raw and potable waters as per objective 1, and to confirm bromate presence in raw waters.
3. To develop novel field based methods for determination of bromate in raw an potable waters.
These robust and low cost methods would be suitable for routine monitoring at a waterworks and should be applicable to on-line monitoring.
4. To clearly specify the advantages and disadvantages of each method and particularly with respect to potential significant interferences.
5. To produce new information concerning the stability of bromate in various types of water (at ug 1{-1} level).
6. To validate some of the developed methods and to organise interlaboratory tests involving 8 to 15 laboratories (for the ion chromatography/conductimetry method and one selected field method) before a CRM is prepared.


The project relates to Theme III.1 (human health) and III.2 (water monitoring). Indeed the World Health Organisation has classified bromate in Group 2B, i.e. 'Possibly carcinogenics to humans'. Therefore as the occurrence of bromate represent a risk for public health, there is an urgent need for rapid and sensitive methodology to analyse bromate in drinking water. As a result, both public health utilities and water utilities need to have in place accurate and repeatable laboratory based method to determine bromide at a ug 1{-1} level. At the end of the project, a reference method will be made at the disposal of CEN TC 230 (Water Analysis).
Dissemination of results achieved within the project and transfer of experience will allow a greater number of European analytical laboratories to determine easily bromate concentrations in distributed drinking waters, with a good accuracy. Confirmation methods for bromate determination will be available in the cases of drinking water difficult to analyse (mainly due to the presence of interferences). Moreover field-methods be available to monitor bromate on waterworks.
The proposed project involves 8 partners (water suppliers and water research institutes.

Funding Scheme

CSC - Cost-sharing contracts

Coordinator

GIE Anjou-Recherche
Address
109,Rue Des Cètes 109
78600 Maison-laffitte
France

Participants (7)

DEUTSCHE VEREINIGUNG DES GAS- UND WASSERFACHES E.V.
Germany
Address
84,Karlsruher Strasse 84
76139 Karlsruhe
KIWA NV - KEURINGSINSTITUUT VOOR WATERLEIDINGARTIKELEN
Netherlands
Address
7,Groningenhaven 7
3433 BB Nieuwegein
Studiecentrum voor Water vzw
Belgium
Address
246,Desguinlei
2018 Antwerpen
Suez-Lyonnaise des Eaux
France
Address
Rue Du Président Wilson 38
78230 Le Pecq
UNIVERSITE DE POITIERS
France
Address
40,Ecole Superieure D'ingenieur De Poitiers - Avenue
86022 Poitiers
University of Sheffield
United Kingdom
Address
Brookhill
S3 7HF Sheffield
Yorkshire Environmental Ltd.
United Kingdom
Address
Mill Close
S60 1BZ Te Rotherham - South Yorkshire