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Scintillation Detectors And New Technologies For Nuclear Security

Final Report Summary - SCINTILLA (Scintillation Detectors And New Technologies For Nuclear Security)

Executive Summary:
The SCINTILLA project began on 1st January 2012 and ended on 31st December 2014. It delivered the SCINTILLA Toolbox, including significant scientific results and developed technologies with a proven capability to replace Helium 3, as well as integrated systems focused on specific needs. Most developed instruments reached maturity. When benchmarked, all complied with international standards and most exceeded them with highly promising results. For some project results, commercial exploitation has already started.
WP1 “Usage Cases definition and assessment” dealt with six Use Cases: UC1 Mobile & relocatable Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) for containers, UC2 Mobile & relocatable RPM for vehicle control, UC3 Mobile & relocatable RPM for luggage, UC4 Mobile & relocatable RPM for people, UC5 Portable device for usage by police & customs in airports, UC6 Communicating miniature device to be used by first responders for bomb detection. Two assessments of WP2 results against these specifications were carried out end of 2013 and 2014.
WP2 “Building SCINTILLA subsystems” developed six subsystems: CZT Gamma Camera subsystem (CEA), the miniatures CZT semiconductors subsystem (CEA), organic scintillators (with PSD) subsystem (CEA), Gadolinium-lined plastic scintillators subsystem (INFN / ANSALDO), Spectrometric detectors subsystem (SYMETRICA), modular 6Li:ZnS(Ag) neutron detector system (SYMETRICA).
WP3 “Device Integration and application sub-systems” (CEA, SAPHYMO, SYMETRICA) integrated these sub-systems into full device systems: RPM for cargo scanning, RPM for vehicle scanning, RPM for luggage scanning, RPM for people scanning, portable devices for use by police and customs in airports, a miniature device.
WP4 Testbed Services and Technology Benchmarking organised three annual technology benchmarks at JRC’s Ispra premises supporting the iterative research process. The test results of the first two campaigns identified outstanding issues for research in WP2 and WP3. The third Benchmark evaluated the final mature portal systems for UC1-UC4. Additional testing campaigns were held as needed at JRC and EK. The third benchmark also covered technologies provided by third party technology suppliers.
WP5 Exploitation, Dissemination and Partnership Network optimised project impact. Awareness was raised through the public website, scientific publications and the participation in external conferences. Two Public Workshops allowed for broad and deep engagement with selected stakeholders from Europe and the USA. The SCINTILLA pre-established Users and Experts Advisory Groups met numerous times and provided valuable feedback along the developments. The SCINTILLA Partnership Network was established and developed; it will continue after project end, not independently, but through emerging H2020 communities. An exploitation strategy was put in place; 3 patents and 3 additional commercial opportunities have been developed by partners.
WP6 Project Management ensured an excellent collaboration between SCINTILLA partners. Project management was carried out daily and relied on web-based tools. Management bodies met on a regular basis. Milestones were met in due time. Periodic reports and deliverables were coordinated by the Project Office to allow regular follow-up and monitoring of the project.

Project Context and Objectives:
Project context
Enhanced detection and identification of radioactive sources and nuclear material (RNM) has become highly important in view of the global trends affecting the security of citizens worldwide and in particular in Europe. SCINTILLA aimed to improve the capabilities of gamma and neutron radiation detectors by building an innovative comprehensive toolbox of devices that (1) address the challenge of masked and shielded material, (2) develop reliable, portable/mobile and cost effective solutions, and (3) find a suitable replacement for Helium-3 based technologies. As the principal consumable material for Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) for neutron detection, this gas is nearly unavailable worldwide.
SCINTILLA relied on innovative detection technologies such as gamma spectrometry and neutron detection (scintillator-based as well as CZT technologies) that offer big potential in the following areas: improved detection and identification of radioactive sources and nuclear material, enhanced portability and mobility, reliable and correct assessment of threats, and cost reductions.
No single technology can meet all these requirements simultaneously. Therefore SCINTILLA did not try to develop a unique technology, but built a toolbox of different technologies, which are complimentary from the following points of view:
• Scope: range of radioactive sources and nuclear material that can be discovered
• Temperature: possibility to operate over an extended temperature range, i.e. as specified by ANSI in temperature ranges between -30°C and 50°C
• Sensitivity and type of analysed target (fixed vs mobile, different speeds of movement (e.g. walking versus driving); small vs large; shielding deeply embedded or masking sources (e.g. in containers) or relatively easy to detect (e.g. in hand luggage)
• Detection of potential threats (limited precision) vs focused analysis of specific threats (high discrimination capability)
• Cost and size: from portals to small devices the size of a matchbox
• Technology readiness: from promising concepts (TRL = 3) to concepts, which can be expected to be ready for full-scale demonstration shortly after the project (TRL = 5 or 6)
To support and select the best-of-breed technologies to be integrated into full prototype devices, SCINTILLA relied on technology regular testing and annual benchmarking. These technologies were integrated into several devices and adapted to specific Use Cases (UCs) including relocatable RPMs (respectively for controlling containers, vehicle control, luggage control and people); a portable device for use by police and customs in airports as well as a communicating miniature device to be used by first responders for bomb detection. To facilitate the integration and communication of such devices, communication protocols were developed as input to standardisation efforts.
To optimise impact beyond the scope and the duration of the project, the partners worked on the creation and development of the SCINTILLA Partnership Network (SPN). It gathered the worldwide community interested in nuclear material detection and identification during the project duration. While the SPN will not continue independently following the project as it did not prove sustainable beyond its lifespan, it was a valuable community during the course of the project. It will be included in already existing FP7 communities and emerging H2020 communities.

Project objectives and results
WP1 Usage Cases definition and assessment

Objectives
• Defining usage cases (UC1 to UC6)
• Defining the specifications for the development of detection systems suitable for UC1 to UC6
• Initially assessing UC2 and UC4
• Finally assessing all detector systems for the different usage cases
• Developing user guidelines for the SCINTILLA toolbox

Results
Six Usage cases (UC) were defined by project partners at project start with the valuable involvement of project experts and end-users (UAG/EAG): UC1 Mobile & relocatable RPM for containers, UC2 Mobile & relocatable RPM for vehicle control, UC3 Mobile & relocatable RPM for luggage, UC4 Mobile & relocatable RPM for people, UC5 Portable device for usage by police & customs in airports, UC6 Communicating miniature device to be used by first responders for bomb detection.
To each UC corresponded a technology having its own specifications. Once entirely defined, developments started on an iterative basis: testing and benchmarking campaigns were organised in order to assess the performances in line with relevant standards. In particular, the initial assessment was held in December 2013 (UC2 and UC4). Following numerous technical improvements, the SCINTILLA technologies were finally assessed in November and December 2014 at project end. All technologies constitute the overall SCINTILLA toolbox for which user guidelines have been established.
WP2 Building SCINTILLA subsystems

Objectives
• Providing a Toolbox in the form of sensor sub-systems
• The following technologies were investigated: plastic scintillator with PSD, 6LiZnS neutron detectors, Gd-lined plastic detectors, Spectroscopic PVT and NaI detector systems, Miniature CZT semiconductors and CZT Gamma Camera

Results
Positive results of the first benchmark (Nov. 2012) highlighted possible improvements of the firstly developed technologies. Partners actively used year 2 in improving the sensors, carried out software analysis and automatic N42.42 files analysis. Partners’ new technologies, such as the alternatives to He-3 neutron detectors, had to cope with ANSI and IEC standard which were to be met during benchmarking campaigns. Additional testing campaigns were organised, notably in June 2014 at JRC.
For neutron detectors, the challenge was to find the optimum necessary sensitivity in application to vehicle and pedestrian portals. For all technologies a second pillar was developed to be tested at the third benchmark in November 2014. The improvements of the CZT Gamma detector and camera were considerable and led to quite promising emerging technologies.
WP3 Device Integration and application sub-systems

Objectives
• Delivering 2 integrated RPM devices for assessment against vehicle and people scanning UCs
• Integrating the technologies selected in the Benchmarks in M12 and M24, following a classical development life cycle (specification, design, development, test, integration)
• Producing 2 versions of the respective devices for those UCs where two assessments were planned (UC2&UC4). This allowed the validation of the integration and assessment approach, as well as trial technologies, which are relatively mature and interesting candidates for the replacement of He-3.
Defining a straight-forward integration process through compatibility, communication protocols and standards at early stages. At the end of the project, the results will be published and communicated to the respective standardisation bodies and public authorities. Significant effort has been put into implementing and evaluating communication protocols within this project. The findings of this project will be published on the SCINTILLA website.

Results
An initial proposal detailing compatibility, communication protocols and standards has been created early in the project in order to simplify the integration activities.
The integration of RPM for cargo (UC1) that uses both He-3 free neutron detectors and spectroscopic gamma detectors has been generated and evaluated. An RPM for vehicles (UC2), which system design demonstrated integrated neutron detection with He-3 free neutron detectors, has been successfully achieved. A RPM for scanning luggage (UC3) has been built and successfully evaluated. The integration of RPM for people scanning (UC4) has been successfully achieved in 2 versions. It demonstrated integrated neutron detection with He-3 free neutron detectors and a range of spectroscopic detection systems with differing performance for assessment in real life environments. Two devices have been built and evaluated to address UC5: a CZT camera and a low volume He-3 free neutron detector. A prototype device for UC6 has been developed using CZT.
Finally, recommendations on standards for systems dealing with the detection of radioactive sources and nuclear materials have been made. The extensive work by the partners on the communication protocols needed resulted in the following three recommendations:
- It is recommended that a neutron detector designed to replace a He-3 neutron detector must include the output a TTL pulse
- It is recommended that no standard should be applied to the level 2 communication.
- It is recommended that all instrumentation systems dealing with the detection of radioactive sources & nuclear materials should provide data in the ANSI N42.42 file format.
WP4 Testbed Services and Technology Benchmarking

Objectives
• Providing Testbed services to technologies under development in order to evaluate performance
• Performing Annual Technology Benchmarks to compare technologies and evaluate their aptness within the SCINTILLA Toolbox

Results
The existing testing facilities at JRC and EK have been upgraded during the project. Test-bed services have been made available during the entire project to SCINTILLA partners and occasionally to other developers, especially during open Benchmark campaigns.
Three annual Technology Benchmarks were executed during the project to monitor the development and assess the performances of the toolkit components: the 1st Benchmark was restricted to SCINTILLA partners, the 2nd was enlarged to non-commercial developers outside the Consortium and the 3rd was open to all participants who wanted to apply. The test results consisted in a detailed knowledge of detection performances of the different tools, compared among the others, and with respect to the requirements of international standards and usage cases.
WP5 Exploitation, Dissemination and Partnership Network

Objectives
• Defining concept for a sustainable SCINTILLA Partnership Network (SPN)
• Involving small groups of user representatives and technical experts
• Creating awareness about SCINTILLA in the industrial community to encourage other applications, create links with the scientific community to open new horizons and enable future innovation
• Managing IPR issues

Results
A first strategic concept for building the SPN was agreed upon during the first year. The SPN was officially launched at the first Public Workshop in Budapest, Hungary (Sept. 2013). The recruitment of SPN members during the project lifetime was successful. However, its sustainability was further discussed. Following a market study, the dissemination team came to the conclusion that members were only interested in participating when SPN events were paid for by SCINTILLA. The SPN could thus not be self-funded beyond the project and the consortium was unable to find alternative sources for funding. Therefore the SPN in its initial understanding ended with the project. However, the EC funds a project, ITRAP+10 – phase II, where partner JRC is the implementer. This will guarantee the availability of 3 SCINTILLA partner laboratories (JRC, FhG INT and EK) for the next few years. Also, the community built within the SPN has been greatly encouraged to join other FP7 and H2020 emerging communities in similar domains of the nuclear detection in order first to benefit from the effort invested in the SPN during SCINTILLA and, secondly, for the members to find a continuity in the offer of research projects.
The User Advisory Group (UAG) and the Expert Advisory Group (EAG) were established at project start. They gathered a dozen members who regularly met with the consortium. They attended the first UAG/EAG meeting (Apr. 2012), the first and final Public Workshops (Sept. 2013 and Dec. 2014). Two webinars were also scheduled (Apr. 2013 and Apr. 2014) in order to share Benchmark results with UAG/EAG members and gather their feedback for possible improvements of the technologies.
The SCINTILLA partners used the network to spread the news about the project, the developed technologies as well as the European FP7 funding and collaboration frame. To support their actions, communication tools have been developed (e.g. project leaflet and poster, public website). The two SCINTILLA Public Workshops (Sept. 2013 and Dec. 2014) as well as the Benchmark campaigns in Feb. 2014 (open to non-commercial developers) and Nov. 2014 (open to all outsiders including COTS) were all successful opportunities to create awareness and establish links with the scientific community. Interactions with other FP7-Security projects also contributed to creating awareness about SCINTILLA and links in between research projects partners. The IPR team was established at the beginning of the project. However, there were no IPR issues and the IPR team was not called upon.
WP6 Project Management

Objectives
• Ensuring the strategic, financial and contractual management of the consortium
• Ensuring the day-to-day operational project management
• Setting up the management infrastructure

Results
All contractual documents were established, signed and shared with all project partners and the EC if needed during the first months of the project.
The pre-financing shares and the first periodic payment were distributed to all partners according to the agreed timeline and breakdown and in line with the Grant and the Consortium Agreements rules.
The management procedures and the quality plan were defined and agreed upon at the Project Kick-off meeting. The project management tools were made available to all project partners on the project private website. A risk register was established and regularly updated throughout the project. These daily actions were carried out until the end of the project and proved successful in ensuring effective day-to-day operational project management. The SCINTILLA consortium set up its General Assembly, which met once a year during a consortium meeting, and its Executive Board, which met every month during a project management follow up teleconference.

Project Results:
WP1 Use Cases definition and assessment
Start date M1
Activity type RTD
Participant ID 1 2 6
Part. short name CEA JRC FhG INT
PM total (for 60M) 1 4.60 14
PM spent in period 1 1 2.6 6.6
PM spent in period 2 0 0.58 4.6
PM spent total 0 3.18 11.2
Overview of the progress of the work during the period
The objectives of WP1 were the definition of the usage cases UC1 to UC6, specifications for the development of detection systems suitable for UC1 to UC6, an initial assessment of the detector systems concerning UC2 and UC4 and a final assessment concerning all UCs. In addition, user guidelines had to be created.
For each of the 6 UCs a detailed analysis of user requirements and usage context constraints was carried out, including input from experts and end users from the Expert Advisory Group (EAG) and User Advisory Group (UAG), and led to a particularised definition of these UCs. Detailed specifications for the development of detection systems suitable for the defined UCs were elaborated, based on standards (such as ANSI N.42 IAEA or IEC standards) and expert knowledge, interviews and workshop discussions.
To have a sounded basis for the assessment of the detector systems a variety of tests was performed in the course of the project, including near-to-real-life tests (see also WP4) and the relevant data were compiled. For UC2 and UC4 an initial assessment was given in 2013, for all usage cases a final assessment report was delivered in December 2014.
Furthermore user guidelines were elaborated. They summarize the UCs and the main features of the provided detectors to help the potential user to select a tool from the SCINITLLA-Toolbox for one’s specific needs.
Work progress in each task
1.1 Use Case UC1 Mobile & relocatable RPM for containers
1.2 Use Case UC2 Mobile & relocatable RPM for vehicle control
1.3 Use Case UC3 Mobile & relocatable RPM for luggage
1.4 Use Case UC4 Mobile & relocatable RPM for people
1.5 Use Case UC5 Portable device for usage by police & customs in airports
1.6 Use Case UC6 Communicating miniature device to be used by first responders for bomb detection
Tasks 1.1 to 1.6: For each UC, the definition and the specifications for the development of detection systems were delivered in May 2012. The task was accompanied by a two-day UAG/EAG workshop in April 2012 at the JRC in Ispra, Italy which was planned and accomplished in cooperation with JRC. This was the opportunity to gather users and experts feedback.
Based on different laboratory tests, the benchmark results and near-to-real-life tests a final assessment was given for SCINTILLA detectors referring to all 6 UCs. The reports were delivered in December 2014.
Tasks 1.2 and 1.4: In addition to the final assessment an initial assessment of UC2 and UC4 was completed in December 2013.
As detailed in related deliverables (DL 112, DL123, DL132, DL143, DL152, DL162), at project end the TRL is evaluated as follows:
Use Case UC1 Mobile & relocatable RPM for containers (TRL7)
Use Case UC2 Mobile & relocatable RPM for vehicle control (TRL7)
Use Case UC3 Mobile & relocatable RPM for luggage (TRL6)
Use Case UC4 Mobile & relocatable RPM for people (TRL6-7)
Use Case UC5 Portable device for usage by police & customs in airports (TRL5 – system, TRL9 – technology)
Use Case UC6 Communicating miniature device to be used by first responders for bomb detection (TRL4)

1.7 SCINTILLA Toolbox User guidelines
Relevant information for the SCINTILLA Toolbox User guidelines were collected in the course of the project, especially during different tests, including the near-to-real-life tests (confer WP4) and the guidelines were completed in December 2014.
Significant results
For each UC, the definition and the specifications for the development of detection systems were described in detail in deliverables DL111-D161 and acted as a basis for the development of the detection systems in WP2 and WP3. For each UC a comprehensive assessment of the developed solutions was elaborated, based on different tests and benchmark results, including near-to-real-life tests.
Deviations
The deliverables DL111-D161 were postponed to May 2012 (3-month delay) as the writing of the documents needed the feedback of the Experts and Users Advisory Groups members (workshop in month 4). The deliverables DL122 and DL142 were also slightly postponed. These deviations did not cause any delay for the work to be carried out in other WPs.
Description of problem / deviation Suggested / undertaken corrective action Impact on other WPs, budget/PM plan or work plan
Delay of deliverables DL111-D161 (necessary feedback from EAG/UAG members) EAG/UAG Workshop scheduled month 4, DL111-D161 were delivered shortly after the meeting. Deviation had no lasting impact on other WPs.

WP2 Building SCINTILLA subsystems
Start date M1
Activity type RTD
Participant ID 1 3 4 5 9
Part. short name CEA INFN ANSALDO EK SYMETRICA
PM total (for 60M) 63.8 48.00 20 20 32
PM spent in period 1 46.67 25.04 11.24 13 32.6
PM spent in period 2 38.01 37.52 6.59 7.3 11.70
PM spent total 84.68 62.56 17.83 20.3 44.3
Overview of the progress of the work during the period
Technical developments for the period are related to:
- a Plastic associated with Gd detector (INFN)
- a CZT camera (CEA LETI)
- a wearable CZT detector and Plastic scintillator for neutron discrimination (CEA LIST)
- LiZnS neutron and new PVT and NaI spectrometers for isotope identification (SYMETRICA)
All partners participated in benchmark campaigns held in February 2013, February 2014 and November 2014 at JRC. Some partners participated to additional test beds at JRC in June 2014. Progress was recorded during each campaign. During the 3rd one, all partners benchmarked double detector sets.
Work progress in each task

2.1 Building the CZT Gamma Camera subsystem (CEA)
Two CZT gamma-camera have been developed and tested during the project: a large (50 cm3) camera “Myriagami” with limited energy discrimination capabilities and a smaller (8 cm3) camera “Hispect” with good energy resolution. Both systems use embedded calibration and test algorithms to ease their operation. One additional interest of the “Hispect” system is its portability and the possibility to be operated on a small battery.
The software used for image acquisition and visualization has been developed and is compatible with both cameras. It allows real time detection, isotope identification and image visualization and can automatically save data in N42 files. N42 format has been extended to include gamma-ray image data.
Both cameras have been tested with various kinds of gamma-ray sources, from Am-241 to Co-60. Their performance is similar, even if identification capabilities of “Hispect” camera are obviously superior. However, from the sensitivity point of view, “Myriagami”, seems slightly. Their performance have been studied in the second and the final benchmarks at JRC Ispra.

2.2 Building the miniatures CZT semiconductors subsystem (CEA)
The CEA CZT detector is now under industrialisation by a company called IMS. The signed licence allows IMS with the active support to CEA to carry out the detector ready to be sailed on the market under short delay. Even if the TRL was close to 3-4 at the last benchmark in November 2014, the improvements were already consistent and promising in December 2014.

2.3 Building the organic scintillators (with PTD) subsystem (CEA)
CEA DEN has supported the design of plastic scintillators with enhanced neutron-gamma discrimination power. A new simulation toolkit based on ROOT data analysis software was developed to couple photon-neutron transport with MCNP PoliMi Monte Carlo particle transport code and optical photon tracking in the scintillator with Litrani ROOT library. POLITRANI has allowed determining the maximum size of plastic scintillators to perform traditional neutron-gamma discrimination purely based on Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD). Studies performed with POLITRANI show that 5”(L)×5”() cylinders is an upper size limit, the PSD capability of the scintillator decreasing within increasing scintillation size. Other means have to be envisaged for large detectors such as coincidence analysis between the detected particles.
The CEA LIST efforts deployed in the second period were continuous in the objective to enhance efficiency and reduce false alarm rate. CEA LIST patented PTD (Pulse Time Discrimination) was finally used instead of PSD. The patent called “Neutron Gamma discrimination” is deposed under n°13 58552. The success was obtained at the third benchmark for a four pillars equivalent system. As only two pillars was used, they were positioned at a lower distance to the source path way. According to the Inverse square law, two pillars at 1.77m are equivalent to four pillars at 2.5m. The ANSI standard was fully met for neutron detection which was the first objective of the SCINTILLA project.
For gamma detection, all sources were detected except 241Am and 57Co. Nevertheless, the plastic scintillator with CEA electronic board were able to detect them. CEA will implement a new patent in the coming months following SCINTILLA. The patent called “Spectrometric recognition” is deposed under n°14 60162.

2.4 Building the Gadolinium-lined plastic scintillators subsystem(INFN, ANSALDO)
The objective was to develop an RPM for vehicle and cargo containers based on Gd-lined plastic scintillator detectors. The work performed in the first 18 months of the project was focused on the validation of the proposed technology and on the development of an optimized technical design of the detector units with implementation of the initial integration guidelines. The results of this activity were described in DL241, DL242 and DL243, and summarized in the midterm project report.
The main activities completed by INFN and ANN in the last 18 months of the project were:
• the realisation of a detector prototype based on the optimized design that was developed in the first 18 months of the project;
• the commissioning and test of the newly built detector both in the INFN Genova laboratories and in the JRC-ITRAP+10 facility;
• the participation to the 2nd SCINTILLA benchmark with the new Gd-lined scintillator detector system;
• the completion of the detector integration according to both a Level-2 and a Level-3 approach that were assessed in the JRC tests of June 2014;
• the realization of a second detector unit with additional improvements to the mechanical structure
• the upgrade of the System Control Software to handle the double pillar configuration and implement new algorithms to cope with variable background;
• the commissioning and test of the full Gd-lined scintillator RPM in Genova and Ispra;
• the participation to the 3rd SCINTILLA benchmark with the double pillar RPM.
In the second half of 2013, a new detector unit was built based on the optimised designed of the Gd-lined scintillator detector that was presented in DL243. In the new layout, the active volume was increased to enhance the efficiency for neutron detection, while the grouping of the scintillator layers and their coupling to the PMT was modified to increase the sensitivity to low-energy gamma. In parallel to the detector construction, a major upgrade of the System Control Software (SCS) was completed both to improve its performances in terms of data transfer speed and stability, and to implement the necessary features for the integration of the Gd-lined scintillator detector in a full RPM according to both a Level 2 and Level 3 approach. This work was detailed in DL244.
After initial tests performed in the INFN Genova laboratories, the new detector system was installed in the JRC-ITRAP+10 facility for further tests and participation to the 2nd SCINTILLA benchmark in February 2014. The results of the benchmark confirmed the improvement in detection efficiency showing the new system complies and sometime exceed international standards for gamma and neutron detection. The neutron detection efficiency was found to be below standards only when the detector was exposed to very intense gamma sources: in these conditions, limitations of the present electron readout system affects the system performances as discussed in DL2.45 which provides a detailed presentation of the system performances.
The detector integration as Level-2 and Level-3 system were assessed during outdoor tests completed at JRC in June 2014. The measurement performed in a real-life configuration confirmed that the Gd-lined scintillator detector can be successfully operated both when interfaced to the Saphymo Mixing Box in a Level-2 configuration or when operated as standalone system according to a Level-3 approach providing the functionalities required for vehicle or container RPMs.
In the second half of 2014, a second detector unit was built based on the 2013 design with improvement of the mechanical structure. This new unit was commissioned and test in the INFN Genova laboratories in the fall of 2014, showing a response that was remarkably similar to the first detector unit: this confirms the reliability of the chosen design and the reproducibility of the assembly and calibration procedure. An upgrade of the SCS was performed in order to handle both single and double pillar RPM configuration as discussed in DL245. After the initial performance tests with static sources, the double pillar Gd-lined scintillator RPM was transferred to JRC to participate to the final test and benchmark of the project in November 2014. The results obtained both during this period confirmed and exceed what had previously been achieved with the single pillar configuration. In particular, the RPM was capable of detecting both thermalized neutron sources (20000 n/s with 8-cm thick HDPE shield) and low activity sources (13000 n/s) in 100% of the transits.
In the last months of the project further development of the SCS were performed aiming at the implementation of a gamma spectroscopic functions based on the analysis of the gamma energy spectrum measured by the detectors. A preliminary version of the algorithms was tested in the Genova laboratories. In parallel, the design of IP65 cabinets and support structures for the outdoor installation of the Gd-lined scintillator detectors was developed in view of a possible real-life test of the RPM system.

2.5 Building the Spectrometric detectors subsystem (SYMETRICA, EK)
The following progress has been made concerning this task:
• Four new detectors types have been designed and built that use a common design architecture that was previously developed and deployed in SYMETRICA’s RPMs. These include both large and small PVT and NaI detector subsystems.
• All the devices use a patented stabilisation system that ensures that the detector sub system remains calibrated at all times.
• Development testing has been carried out at both EK and JRC providing opportunities to test the detector sub-systems with medical sources, NORMs and nuclear materials.
• The detector systems have been benchmarked at JRC and the results collated and assessed (DL421, DL422, DL423).
• This assessment showed some new capabilities, especially with large volume PVT detectors.
• An integration guide that covers the detailed interfaces, both mechanical and software, has been developed and provided.
• Both the PVT and NaI spectroscopic detector subsystems have been provided for integration into RPMs for use in UC1, UC2, UC3 and UC4.
• The integrated RPMs containing these detector subsystems have been evaluated as part of WP1 against these UCs.
• The work carried out has resulted in detectors that have met the initial goals of this task.

2.6 Building a modular 6Li:ZnS(Ag) neutron detector system (SYMETRICA)
The following progress has been made in this task:
• A range of neutron detector subsystems has been developed that use a common design architecture that was previously developed and deployed in SYMETRICA’s RPMs. These include a larger modular 6Li:ZnS(Ag) neutron detector system for use in RPM for vehicles and cargo and low volume solid state read out 6Li:ZnS(Ag) neutron detector subsystems suitable for man portal devices.
• The detector system has been benchmarked and the results collated and assessed (DL421, DL422, DL423).
• This assessment showed that LiZnS detectors are suitable as a He-3 proportional counter replacement in all UCs being assessed.
• An integration guide that covers the detailed interfaces, both mechanical and software, has been developed and provided.
• Both the large modular detector subsystem and the low volume detector subsystem have been provided for integration into RPMs for use in UC1, UC2, UC3, UC4 and UC5.
• The integrated RPMs containing these detector sub systems have been evaluated as part of WP1 against these UCs.
• All the detector subsystem that have been evaluated as part of the project are now being made commercially available
• An even smaller detector subsystem, suitable for use in handheld devices, has been developed as a result of the work in this project, although it has not been assessed as part of this project. This device is also being put into a commercially available product.
• The work carried out has resulted in detectors that have met the initial goals of this task.
Significant results
2.1 Building the CZT Gamma Camera subsystem (CEA)
A second kind of CZT-based technology, using an innovative sub-pixel positioning has been used to build a coded aperture gamma-camera. A common software for the two cameras has been developed to allow a user-friendly real time visualisation with isotope identification and overlay of optical image with 3-color gamma image.

2.2 Building the miniatures CZT semiconductors subsystem (CEA)
The CZT detector is under licence contracted by the company IMS. The shape of the detector is small enough to be wearable according to the constraints of first responders.

2.3 Building the organic scintillators (with PTD) subsystem (CEA)
The CEA organic scintillator developed during SCINTILLA proved that the new device is able to replace Helium-3 for neutron detection. A patent was submitted describing the very new method called PTD, Pulse Time Discrimination. The device use very common EJ200 plastic scintillator. Both Gamma and Neutron radiation are detected with the same sensor.

2.4 Building the Gadolinium-lined plastic scintillators subsystem (INFN, ANSALDO)
A double pillar RPM for vehicle and containers was developed based on the Gd-lined plastic scintillator technology. A detailed technical design of the detector units and system architecture was completed and a custom System Control Software to operate the system was developed. The detector units were integrated in a complete portal according to both a Level-2 and Level-3 approach. The completed system was tested in the SCINTILLA benchmark campaign demonstrating the validity of the proposed technology, the robustness of the chosen design and the effectiveness of the built system. The RPM performances were found to comply and sometime exceed the international standards requirement for neutron and gamma detection efficiency for vehicle RPMs. This work was documented in deliverables DL241, DL242 DL243, DL244, DL245 and DL246.

2.5 Building the Spectrometric detectors subsystem (SYMETRICA, EK)
At EK, the prototype of conveyor was established, temporary laboratory for the first round of tests set up and first test campaign were carried out. The basic infrastructure of the new test facility was ready and the final version of the test conveyor constructed and deployed.
Deliverables DL251, DL253 and DL255 have been completed following sensor benchmarking results: they outline the detector design architecture used.
DL252, DL254 and DL256 have been completed providing a complete guide to the integration of the detector modules into a system.
Four detector subsystems have been built and benchmarked against the RPM requirements with excellent results.
Following the detector subsystem benchmarking NaI crystal modules have been provided for both a RPM for scanning people and a RPM for scanning cargo or vehicles. These have been tested at the final benchmark and evaluated as WP1.
The PVT detector subsystem modules tested in the first benchmark have now been deployed in state-of-the-art commercial RPM for scanning cargo and vehicles.

2.6 Building a modular 6Li:ZnS(Ag) neutron detector system (SYMETRICA)
Deliverable DL261, DL263 and DL265 have been completed outlining the detector design architecture used.
DL262, DL264 and DL266 have been completed providing a complete guide to the integration of the detector modules into a system.
Detector subsystems for three different volume neutron detectors have been built and benchmarked against the RPMs for vehicle, cargo, luggage and pedestrian use cases, with excellent results.
Two Neutron detector modules have been provided to SAPHYMO for integration into a RPM for scanning vehicles, demonstrating a successful integration into a third party RPM.
Both the large volume modular neutron detector subsystem and the low volume solid state neutron detector subsystem have now be launched as commercially available devices and are being deployed into state of the art RPMs and human portable system.
Deviations
(1) CEA over consuming equipment and PMs for task 2.2
(2) INFN slight over consuming PMs for task 2.4.
(3) SYMETRICA slight over consuming PMs for task 2.5 and 2.6.
Description of problem / deviation Suggested / undertaken corrective action Impact on other WPs, budget/PM plan or work plan
(1) The last period effort was very time consuming for CEA team which overspent schedule time to solve the dynamic source detection capture. CEA developed the dynamic test system as described in reports. None
(2) The INFN consumption of PMs exceeded what was originally planned because more technician labour than considered initially was necessary for the design and construction of the Gd-lined detector units. At the same time, the number of PMs of staff scientist labour was reduced with respect to the initial budget because the results obtained in the 2nd benchmark exceeded expectations and the development work required in the last 10 months of the project covered less than planned. The increase of technical staff PMs was compensated by a reduction of staff scientists PMs. Indeed the hourly cost of technical staff is lower than that of scientists, the total cost will only marginally exceed the allocated budget. Consequently, the overconsumption of PMs does not result in a significant increase of costs. None
(3) The apparent overrun on project PM is greater than that on total manpower costs. Indeed the manpower costs are driven by the actual costs of the people used on the project. Since the original budget was established, some more recent graduates have been recruited to work on SCINTILLA. Their hourly rate is lower than that of the more established staff considered at project initial budgeting. The opportunities to advance the new ideas on gamma detectors have been greater than those for new ideas on the neutron detectors, so more effort were put in that direction. The budget initially envisaged the same effort for both. None

WP3 Device Integration and application sub-systems
Start date M3
Activity type RTD
Participant ID 1 8 9
Part. short name CEA SAPHYMO SYMETRICA
PM total (for 60M) 9 12.2 11
PM spent in period 1 0.38 8.70 5.10
PM spent in period 2 3.13 13.93 4.63
PM spent total 3.51 22.63 9.73
Overview of the progress of the work during the period
WP3 objective was to deliver a range of devices for the detection of radioactive sources and nuclear materials, integrating the sensor sub-systems/technologies selected as a result of the SCINTILLA Technology Benchmarks. In period 1, the target was to deliver two integrated devices (RPMs) for assessment against the vehicle scanning and people scanning UCs defined by WP1. This work started with the preparation of a "Proposal for SCINTILLA communication protocols" for the purpose of streamlining subsequent SCINTILLA integration activities. This task (Task 3.7) was completed successfully on time and the communications protocol has been adopted by the integrating partners.
For each round of the SCINTILLA benchmarking, a number of detectors that were suitable for integration into one or more of the following devices were identified:
• A RPM for cargo scanning (Task 3.1)
• A RPM for vehicle scanning (Task 3.2)
• A RPM for luggage scanning (Task 3.3)
• A RPM for people scanning (Task 3.4)
• A portable devices for use by police and customs in airports (Task 3.5)
• A miniature device (Task3.6)
This was achieved and detector subsystems were integrated into full systems so that they could be evaluated. These included a RPM for scanning cargo (UC1) or vehicles (UC2) and the RPM for scanning luggage (UC3) or people (UC4) for assessment against the UC requirements within WP1. For portable devices for use by police and customs in airports (UC5) two devices have been integrated into systems, a CZT camera and a low volume solid state readout neutron detector. These integrations were completed by CEA, SAPHYMO and SYMETRICA.
Work progress in each task
3.1 Integration of RPM for containers – UC1 (SAPHYMO)
Following the first developments (see UC2 in the chapter 3.2) some new designs have been done to improve the capability of the system. The first system was done to manage only two digital detectors with RS485 interface and two “analogue” detector with TTL/pulse output.
To meet UC1 requirements, SAPHYMO increases its system capability in order to be able to connect up to 8 detectors as described in the scheme below:

To achieve this plan, a new Mixing Board has been designed to support up to 4 detectors:

Also a new Electrical Box has been developed to manage 2 Mixing using 2 Ethernet links:

During this last phase of SCINTILLA, a new software running on the Panel PC has been done to be able to support 4 detectors (the software supporting 2x Mixing Boxes is still under development). Since, only two detectors were available, the validation of the system has been done with a detector simulator which emulates digital (RS485) detector.
Note the new system also supports the “analogue” detectors (TTL/Pulse).

3.2 Integration of RPM for vehicles – UC2 (SAPHYMO)
During the first period, a first version of the enhanced RPM for vehicle control was built. It started by defining the new architecture of the RPM to allow the connection of the “intelligent” detector subsystems.

Both hardware and software development had to be managed:
• HARDWARE: the hardware development included the following subsystems:

Mixing Box
The Mixing Box is used as a data concentrator. All the parts located near the detection area are connected to it. This gives the advantage of having only 2 cables between the detection area and the remote control room; one power cable and one Ethernet cable.

Electrical Box
The Electrical Box delivers the power supply to all of the equipment in the system and signals the status of the system using lamps and a buzzer. It includes an Ethernet switch as well as a watchdog for the monitoring of the Processing unit.

Processing unit (panel PC)
The processing unit is the man to machine interface. It is based on the use of an industrial PC. This is a panel PC with a touch screen. It allows several possibilities for installation, on a wall or on a desk.
• SOFTWARE: For the operation of the system, 3 different softwares were developed:
- Mixing Box software
The Mixing Box software comes in 2 versions. One version is dedicated to detectors communicating at Level 1 like SYMETRICA’s detector. The other version is dedicated to detector subsystems communicating at Level 2 like those of CEA and INFN. The mixing box collects gamma and neutron radiation information from the detectors and transmits them to the treatment unit.
- Data computing software
The Data computing software is the core of the system. It receives information from the detectors and manages the operating mode of the RPM. Two different algorithms were implemented. While waiting for the completion of work carried out by the partners for neutron detection, the gamma radiation analysis was first developed. Then, the neutron analysis algorithm was added. The communication protocol at Level 3 was also developed in order to prepare the connection of the RPM to the test bench for future benchmarking campaigns.
- User interface software
This software is the user friendly interface to display measurements and all relevant data needed by the end user. The user interface software records the vehicle controls and allows the retrieval of data for later exploitation.

The integration tests using the detectors of 3 partners (CEA, INFN, SYMETRICA) were also carried out. The preliminary tests for a full RPM system were carried with 2 detectors from SYMETRICA. The installation was made in SAPHYMO’s factory located approximately 100 km from Paris.
The integration tests done with CEA, INFN and SYMETRICA are detailed in deliverables DL311 and DL322.
In addition, to validate the integration of the system, SAPHYMO has done CEM tests with the complete platform including the panel PC, the Electrical Box, the Mixing Box and two Gamma/Neutron detectors using CEA technology.

3.3 Integration of RPM for luggage – UC3 (SYMETRICA)
A RPM scanning luggage or people has been built using the Small NaI crystal spectrometers and a second version of the low volume LiZnS Neutron detectors developed as part of WP2. The particular design was optimised for measurements at a maximum distance of 1m from the pillars.
The software interface between each of the detectors and the system controller uses a level 2 protocol as defined in Task 3.7. The detectors provide data over this interface and the SYMETRICA RPM User Interface displays the relevant information to the user. The data is then stored by the system in ANSI N42.42 files that are consistent with the level 3 protocol defined in Task 3.7. This has allowed this integrated system to be evaluated with baggage as part of WP1.

3.4 Integration of RPM for people – UC4 (SYMETRICA)
The 1st version of the RPM for scanning people integrates multiple NaI crystal detection modules and a LiZnS (He-3 free) neutron detector into a system suitable for scanning people (DL341). The integration includes occupancy sensors, a user interface and the mechanical infrastructure to allow the detector modules to be used as part of an integrated RPM for scanning people. In order to showcase this installation and to provide a system that can easily be used in a real-life environment, the personnel portal has been built into an exhibition display counter that can be used to promote the activities within SCINTILLA to user experts at the Public Workshop.
A second version of this portal has been built as a two sided portal for scanning people. This design has been optimised based on the lessons learnt during the deployment of the first version. Both the first and second unit use the same software interface described in the section above (3.3). This second version of the portal has now been evaluated as part of WP1 in a hospital and at the JRC test facility against ANSI standards and beyond.

3.5 Integration of portable device for police & customs – UC5 (CEA)
The gamma-cameras integration was described in DL351. Mechanically, the detectors, masks, housing, handles and optical cameras were combined in one system. We have associated batteries to the smaller system (“Hispect”) to permit mobile operation of the system.
Several IO interfaces have been integrated: synchronization, control and data retrieval. Automatic procedures were implemented for an easy calibration of the systems.
Finally, a common software framework has been set up to provide user with an interactive and informative user interface presenting the image at real time during the acquisition. This software exports N42.42 files extended to include imaging data.

3.6 Integration of the miniature device – UC6 (CEA)
The miniature device to be used by first responders (device for UC6) provided in the final version is still under development. It is in the objectives of the IMS company to now integrate the device. Indeed, because of the time constraints, the equipment was not enough developed for integration at SCINTILLA closing date.

3.7 Compatibility, communication protocols and standards (SYMETRICA)
A 3-level protocol has been defined between partners to simplify the integration activities planned within WP3. The three protocol levels use, where possible, previously existing standards. They provide guidelines to how the new detector module(s) should communicate within a system depending on the complexity of the module. The objective was to find a reliable and industrial “intelligent” protocol to fit the requirements and the constraints for the integration of SCINTILLA detector subsystems into a RPM.
Following the experience gained with using the three levels of interface a proposal has been made that recommends standards for systems dealing with the detection of radioactive sources & nuclear materials (DL372).
Significant results
3.1 Integration of RPM for containers – UC1 (SAPHYMO)
SAPHYMO designed a new architecture for RPM systems that is able to receive detectors or detector subsystems brought by 3 partners (CEA, INFN, SYMETRICA). A first version of an integrated vehicle portal suitable for the demonstration of He-free neutron detection based on SCINTILLA technologies has been built and checked with the 3 partners’ detectors.

3.2 Integration of RPM for vehicles – UC2 (SAPHYMO)
SAPHYMO designed a new architecture for RPM systems that is able to receive detectors or detector subsystems brought by 3 partners (CEA, INFN, SYMETRICA). A first version of an integrated vehicle portal suitable for the demonstration of He-free neutron detection based on SCINTILLA technologies has been built and checked with the 3 partners’ detectors.
3.3 Integration of RPM for luggage – UC3 (SYMETRICA)
The integration of a portal suitable for testing the concept of scanning luggage was developed and built. This portal was the same hardware as developed for demonstrating pedestrian scanning. This system is re-locatable and was demonstrated during the Public Workshop held in November 2014.
The demonstration showed that the portal was capable of identifying isotopes in separate suitcases as they passed through the portal at 2.8m/s.

3.4 Integration of RPM for people scanning – UC4 (SYMETRICA)
The integrated pedestrian portal is suitable for the demonstration of people screening using a networkable system. This system is re-locatable and was demonstrated during the Public Workshop held in September 2013.
A second version of this pedestrian portal was built and tested. This portal was evaluated as part of WP1 and benchmarked in November 2014 in the final benchmark.

3.5 Integration of portable device for police & customs – UC5 (CEA)
The gamma-camera integration of ‘’Hispect’’ has been carried out, making it a small and easy to move system that can operate on batteries. User interface has been improved to offer real-time multi-isotope imaging.

3.6 Integration of the miniature device – UC6 (CEA)
2014 focused on re-construction of CZT new shape and did not allow to provide integration interface. On the other hand, the strong interest of IMS Company to promote CZT detector is clearly demonstrated by the investments with, the licence signature, the participation at December 2014 test campaign in Ispra, the presentation at final workshop, and the current test done at CEA. Consequently the integration of the miniature device in effective interface based on SCINTILLA objectives should be assessed within a short delay.

3.7 Development of a simulator for level 2 communication protocol (SYMETRICA)
A 3-level communications protocol has been generated and adopted by the consortium to ease integration. Deliverable DL371 provides illustrative examples of the proposed 3-level protocol to aid integration in WP3.
A recommendations on protocol standards for systems dealing with the detection of radioactive sources and nuclear materials has be proposed in deliverable DL372 based on the experience gain throughout the project using the three level communication protocol.
Deviations: SAPHYMO’s consumable budget over-consumption
Description of problem / deviation Suggested / undertaken corrective action Impact on other WPs, budget/PM plan or work plan
Over consumption of SAPHYMO’s consumable budget: 9267€ spent whereas 7500€ were budgeted. N/A None
Delay in delivery of DL361 as the interface for end users required testing at the Nov. 2014 Benchmark Submitted M36 None

WP4 Testbed Services and Technology Benchmarking
Start date M1
Activity type RTD
Participant ID 1 2 6
Part. short name CEA JRC FhG INT
PM total (for 60M) 6 11.5 7
PM spent in period 1 0 1.7 1.90
PM spent in period 2 4.68 9.8 4.6
PM spent total 4.68 11.5 6.5
Overview of the progress of the work during the period
During the project, the testing facilities at JRC and EK have been upgraded. Their capabilities have been described in DL411.
Three annual SCINTILLA technology benchmarks have been held in Ispra, Italy at JRC facilities.
Work progress in each task
The Testbed facilities have been set-up: the JRC facility in Ispra, Italy was essentially based on the existing ITRAP laboratory, whereas the EK laboratory in Budapest has been built. These facilities have been available for the entire course of the project to provide Testbed services to the developers (dedicated test campaigns to evaluate progress) and for the annual Technology Benchmarks. The status of the Testbed facilities and services provided has been described in deliverables DL411, DL412 and DL413.
The three annual SCINTILLA Technology Benchmarks have been held at JRC premises in Ispra, Italy in February 2013, February 2014 and November 2014 and the results are respectively reported in deliverables DL421, DL422 and DL423.

4.1 Testbed services
The capabilities of the existing Testbed facilities have been described in deliverable DL411 and the upgrades during the project further reported in the successive annual reports. The facilities have been used for some Testbed services during the entire project, but in particular for the three technology benchmarks (see task 4.2).
FhG INT contributed to writing and preparing the testing procedures under the lead of JRC.

4.2 Technology benchmark
The 1st annual SCINTILLA Technology Benchmark has been held at JRC premises in Ispra, Italy in February 2013, restricted to SCINTILLA partners and the results are reported in deliverable DL421.
The 2nd annual SCINTILLA Technology Benchmark has followed in February 2014, opened to some non-commercial developers and the results are reported in deliverable DL422.
The 3rd annual SCINTILLA Technology Benchmark has been finally held in November 2014, opened to all including vendors and the results are reported in deliverable DL423. FhG INT participated in the preparation and the accomplishment of the technology benchmark campaigns and profited of this occasions to perform the tests for the final assessment of instruments.

4.3 SCINTILLA Technology handbook
Planned for M36, the technical Handbook has been completed by each partner to resume in a synthetic document the characteristics and the performance of the devices developed during the project.
Significant results
Three annual technology benchmarks have taken place during the project duration:
- The first one was limited to five SCINTILLA developments ready at the end of the first year, at that time only portal monitor at component level (detectors) aiming to usage cases UC1 to UC4. It mostly aimed to understand the level of development and the preliminary performances with respect to requirements from international standards.
- The second one included also the instruments for UC5 and UC6, which were tested for the first time. The portals for UC1-UC4 had already been developed up to a first level of integrated systems. Moreover some (non-commercial) developers outside the SCINTILLA Consortium were admitted. A total of ten instruments have been tested at this stage.
- Finally the third one aimed to test final mature portal systems, at least for UC1-UC4; the tools for UC5 and UC6 have not yet reached a high TRL (Technology Readiness Level) such to be considered deployable-ready tools. The final benchmark was opened also to vendors allowing a comparison of the SCINTILLA tools to other competitor developments. A total of 13 instruments participated to this final campaign.
During the three benchmarks the instruments of the SCINTILLA toolkit have been extensively tested. The test results of the first campaigns have allowed identifying the weaknesses and the outstanding issues in order to address the further research. They also showed a constant improvement of the equipment performances during the project. Most of the instruments have reached at the end of the project a full maturity; they comply with the requirements of standards and user needs. This is probably the best indicator of the full success of SCINTILLA as a whole.
No deviations

WP5 Exploitation, Dissemination and Partnership Network
Start date M1
Activity type OTHER
Participant ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Part. short name CEA JRC INFN ANSALDO EK FhG INT ART SAPHYMO SYMETRICA
PM total (for 60M) 3.9 3.5 1 1 1 2.6 28 1 1
PM spent in period 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.99 9.87 0 0
PM spent in period 2 3.44 0 2.02 0 0.7 0.95 22.9 1.60 1.08
PM spent total 4.44 0 2.02 0 0.7 1.94 32.8 1.60 1.08
Overview of the progress of the work during the period
WP5 worked towards the overall objective of optimising SCINTILLA efficiency and external impact through the development of the SCINTILLA Partnership Network (SPN). The SCINTILLA partners set up two advisory groups, the User and the Expert Advisory Groups (UAG/EAG) which have met with SCINTILLA partners regularly throughout the project. The members provided comments and recommendations regarding developments in view of their specific needs and usage constraints. In April 2013 and April 2014, they were invited to a webinar to review the SCINTILLA development targets and results and to provide with their expertise. They also attended the two SCINTILLA public Workshops in September 2013 and December 2014.
The SCINTILLA partners defined the project dissemination plan at the beginning of the project and implemented it throughout the course of the project. This dissemination plan was used for the implementation of most dissemination actions, including the SCINTILLA communication strategy. The project leaflet and poster were designed and printed to support partners’ actions to create project awareness. The SCINTILLA public website was launched mid-2012. In addition to providing information and the latest news surrounding the project (including the project newsletter), it provided the possibility to easily register online to the SPN. During the second half of the project, SCINTILLA published 3 scientific and peer reviewed publications and attended a number of conferences and symposiums to gain awareness around the SCINTILLA project. For a complete list of these events, please see section ‎2.
Last but not least, dissemination activities included the establishment and development of a sustainable SPN. The SPN membership concept and offer was summarised in DL531 Strategic concept for development of the SPN and updated in DL532. The SPN offer was officially launched in September 2013 at the Public Workshop in Budapest and a communication strategy was actively used to encourage participation. The dissemination team carried out a market study to gauge interest and sustainability for the SPN. However, the conclusion was that members were only interested in participating when SPN events were paid for by the SCINTILLA project. Thus, the concept of a stand-along organisation proved not to be economically sustainable beyond the duration of the SCINTILLA project. The dissemination team investigated options for effort to be continued: they highly encouraged SPN members to join other H2020 projects communities in the field of nuclear and radioactive detection, CRBN preparedness and response (notably the EDEN project) and civil protection (notably the DRIVER project).
Work progress in each task
5.1 User Advisory Group and Expert Advisory Group
The User Advisory Group (UAG) and the Expert Advisory Group (EAG) were established at project start. They are comprised of a dozen members who met with the consortium partners every year. The first UAG/EAG meeting was held at the JRC, in Ispra, Italy in April 2012. A follow-up webinar was organised in April 2013 in order to keep the UAG/EAG members updated on the SCINTILLA technologies development and to gather their feedback on the reached developments for potential improvements. They participated in the first SCINTILLA public event, the Public Workshop held at EK’s facilities in Budapest, Hungary in September 2013. A follow-up webinar to the Second Benchmark Campaign was organised in April 2014. The UAG/EAG participated to the final Public Workshop held at the JRC, in Ispra, Italy in December 2014. Additionally, following the webinars, individual contact was made with each UAG/EAG member to facilitate further communication on specific technologies between technical partners and UAG/EAG members. Furthermore, UAG/EAG members actively participated in the Public Workshops, giving keynote speeches, as panellists at roundtable discussion, and presentations at the poster session. The UAG/EAG have provided valuable feedback on the SCINTILLA technologies along the overall project duration. Informal discussions at Workshops, coffee breaks and dinners were also very fruitful and have led to continued collaboration between partners and UAG/EAG members, both commercially and for FP7 and H2020 projects.

5.2 Public Communication
The SCINTILLA partners took advantage of their respective networks to spread news about the project, developed technologies as well as the European FP7 funding and collaboration frame. To support their actions, a few months after project launch, the project dissemination plan, from which all dissemination actions were implemented, including the communication strategy, was developed and agreed upon by all partners. Communication tools were developed such as the project leaflet and poster, and the public project website which was launched in August 2012. It provided information and recent news concerning the project (project newsletter), as well as the possibility to easily register online to the SPN. The first main public dissemination event was the SCINTILLA Public Workshop which took place at partner EK’s facilities Budapest, Hungary in September 2013. It was an important and successful opportunity for SCINTILLA partners to communicate with those interested in nuclear detection. The final Public Workshop took place at JRC’s facilities in Ispra, Italy in December 2014 and was an opportunity for SCINTILLA partners to network and share SCINTILLA final results. Two other opportunities for networking took place during the SCINTILLA Benchmark campaigns in February and November 2014. The original intention of these events was to investigate possibilities of developing an independent SPN. However it was concluded that the SPN would not be sustainable through project end. Partners then focused on networking with other FP7 projects and other possible sources for future collaboration. During the second half of the project, SCINTILLA published 3 scientific and peer reviewed publications and attended a number of conferences and symposiums to gain awareness around the SCINTILLA project. For a complete list of these events, please see section ‎2. An article about SCINTILLA was published in the March 2014 edition of the European Securities and Defence Union journal. This journal is targeted towards the European security and defence community and had a current circulation of 6 100. This was an opportunity for SCINTILLA to gain visibility on a notable discussion platform with key decision makers in the security community.

5.3 SCINTILLA Partnership Network
The SPN membership offer was built during the first months of the project, summarised in the DL531 Strategic concept for development of the SPN submitted M14 and updated in DL532 Report on results and future of SCINTILLA Partnership Network submitted M35. JRC and ARTTIC met in June 2013 to define the SPN offer and the targeted message to be spread during the upcoming public event, as well as the business planning of the SPN in order for the concept to be sustainable beyond the project lifetime and scope. The SPN offer was officially launched in September 2013 at the Public Workshop in Budapest and a communication strategy was actively used to encourage participation, including regular updates on the SCINTILLA public website, communication on the Testbed Services and Technology Benchmarking campaigns, networking performed through the project life by each partner, presence at related events, presentations at scientific conferences and the SCINTILLA workshops in September 2013 and December 2014. Recruitment for the SPN was successful; at the end of the project, the SPN consisted of 80 members. With the objective of finding a way for the SPN to be sustainable beyond the project life, the SCINTILLA dissemination team carried out a market study to investigate market interest. This market study showed the dissemination team that self-funding for the SPN would not be possible and as no outside funding was obtained, the SPN ended with the project. The dissemination team thus investigated options for effort to be continued: they highly encouraged SPN members to join other FP7 and H2020 projects communities in the field of nuclear detection. This will benefit to former SPN members, the emerging communities and the concerned R&D projects.
The following recommendation was given at the EC Review in September 2013 for the second half of the project: “#1. Intensify dissemination to general public: Even if the consortium attended and participated in a certain number of events during the first period, the activities for dissemination have been limited. It has to be underlined that these activities have to be an important part of the work to be carried out during the second period”.
The SCINTILLA consortium took this recommendation into account in the following ways:
• Increased amount of updates to the SCINTILLA public website, spreading awareness of the SCINTILLA Public Website via different channels (journal articles, Public Workshop participant lists,…)
• Continued participation to scientific conferences and events
• Publication in the European Securities and Defence Union journal, a non-scientific journal
• Enrichment of contact list for the Public Workshop: over 500 people were invited to the Final Public Workshop. While only 50 people attended, the invitation to the Public Workshop was still a way to create further awareness around the project and its results

5.4 Exploitation and IPR Management
The IPR team was set up and confirmed by a General Assembly vote with the intention to meet whenever necessary to discuss IPR management issues and protection. However, no IPR issues had to be resolved during the project and therefore the IPR team did not have to meet.
Concerning exploitation, three deliverables, DL541, DL542 and DL543 were prepared and submitted. An exploitation strategy was put in place and respected by all partners. 3 patents and 3 additional commercial opportunities have been developed by partners, including partnerships between CEA and SAPHYMO, CEA and IMS, INFN and ANSALDO and will be exploited following the project.
The following recommendation was given at the EC Review in September 2013 for the second half of the project: “2. Intellectual Property Rights Even if the project is mainly technical, the issue of the Intellectual Property Rights is critical and particular attention to it shall be paid during the project implementation.”
The second half of the project spent much more time on IPR issues as there were relevant IPR issues during this period, including 3 patents and 3 commercial opportunities. Further information about IPR can be found in the 3 IPR and exploitation deliverables, DL541, DL542 and DL543.

Significant results
5.1 User Advisory Group and Expert Advisory Group
The UAG and EAG were established at project start. They met 3 times with partners throughout the project and attended 2 webinars to provide feedback to the consortium about technology results. UAG/EAG members were impressed by project results and provided valuable insight and feedback for possible improvements to the consortium.

5.2 Public Communication
The project partners established a dissemination plan (DL521) from which dissemination actions were implemented. These include the production of the project printed material – leaflet and poster (DL523) as well as the launching of the project public website mid-2012 (DL522 – www.scintilla-project.eu). Not only does this website provide information on the project and regular news (through the project newsletters), the developed technologies as well as the European FP7 funding and collaboration frame, it also gives the opportunity to any web-user interested in joining the SPN to register online. During the second half of the project, SCINTILLA published 3 scientific and peer reviewed publications and attended a number of conferences and symposiums to gain awareness around the SCINTILLA projects. For a complete list of these events, please see section ‎2.

5.3 SCINTILLA Partnership Network
Project partners established the SPN and agreed upon a Strategic concept for development of the SPN (DL531) and Report on Results and Future of SPN (DL532) . While the SPN will not continue following the project, SCINTILLA technologies and partner laboratories will live on through other opportunities such as ITRAP+10 phase 2 and the EDEN supplier platform. Also, the community built through the SPN will be incited to be continued through emerging communities of related FP7 and H2020 projects in the field of nuclear security.

5.4 Exploitation and IPR Management
An exploitation strategy was put in place and 3 patents and 3 additional commercial opportunities have been developed by partners.
Deviations
Description of problem / deviation Suggested / undertaken corrective action Impact on other WPs, budget/PM plan or work plan
Delay in delivering DL512 Minutes of User Advisory Group and of Expert Advisory Group (M13) As the EAG/UAG meeting was held on September 12th, the deadline for submitting this DL was postponed to the end of September 2013 (M21). None
Delay in delivering DL533 First Public Workshop report (M18) As the Public Workshop was held on September 11th&12th, the deadline of this DL was postponed to the end of September 2013 (M21). None
Delay in delivering DL541 First report on SCINTILLA exploitation and IPR issues (M14)
As the development of SCINTILLA technologies took place over the few past months, IPR issues are only beginning to be discussed. The work on the document was delayed and submitted in M25. This did not impact any other work progress. None
Delay in delivering DL532 Report on Results and Future of SPN The work on the document was delayed due to internal discussions between partners and delayed development of the SPN strategy. No direct impact on the project, however the SPN will not continue following project end.

WP6 Project Management
Start date M1
Activity type MGT
Participant ID 1 7
Part. short name CEA ART
PM total (for 60M) 6 12
PM spent in period 1 3.83 7.21
PM spent in period 2 2.9 6.32
PM spent total 6.73 13.53
Overview of the progress of the work during the period
ARTTIC, the Project Office, and CEA, the Project Coordinator, worked closely together and shared project management tasks and responsibilities.
The Project Office put into place web-based tools for partners to exchange information, be informed of what is expected from the consortium, and be continually updated on project progress. These tools were used and adapted to partners needs continuously throughout the project.
The collaboration between partners was excellent and partners were fully involved and active in preparing scientific deliverables, attending meetings, and each partner contributed actively and with great added value to the project
Suitable management bodies and procedures for the project were set up and utilised throughout the project. The General Assembly (GA) met five times as planned, and the Executive Board (EB) held a teleconference every month. All meeting minutes and deliverables were delivered on time except for a few justified delays. Contractual documents have been agreed upon and signed by all partners, and shared with the EC when needed. Besides the initial set up of the project management process, methods and tools, regular milestones were to be met during the project to assess the efficient project management. The calendar was respected and regular feedback was put in place. It led to regular updates of the action lists for both the managing team and the partners.
Work progress in each task

6.1 Strategic management and financial administration
All contractual documents were established, signed and shared with all project partners and the EC if needed during the first months of the project.
The pre-financing shares and the first payment from the EC following the midterm project report were distributed to all partners according to the agreed timeline and breakdown (2 payments) and in line with the Grant and the Consortium Agreements rules.
Each partner provided or will provide Financial Statements at the end of each reporting. The Project Office provided the templates and organised the collection of Financial Statements and Certificates. In addition, the Project Office coordinated 2 internal reporting (see task 6.2 below) to monitor budget consumption in between periods.
In terms of strategic management, SCINTILLA partner’s effort and involvement throughout the project proved the success of the collaboration. SCINTILLA utilised all tools needed for success to achieve great technical results, promising exploitation and fruitful further collaboration in between partners.

6.2 Consortium management
At project start, the SCINTILLA consortium set up its GA, which met once a year during a physical consortium meeting, and its EB, which meets every month during a project management follow-up teleconference. Additional physical meetings or teleconference were organised whenever needed. The physical meetings were often combined with an already existing meeting (Benchmarks or Public Workshops) in order to reduce travel costs and save time.
The management procedures and the quality plan were defined and agreed upon at the Project Kick-off meeting, and were then coordinated by the Project Office and respected by all partners throughout the project. All project management tools were available on the project private website. A risk register was established and was regularly updated. These procedures are daily actions that were carried out until the end of the project and proved to be successful in ensuring a day-to-day operational project management. In addition to the two Periodic Project Reports submitted to the European Commission, partners were initially expected to provide internal reporting on a six-monthly basis including estimated budget and efforts consumption, as well as a monthly report (work progress, deviation if any). However, as the project was on track, internal reporting every 6 months was not necessary and a period of every 9 months proved to be sufficient.

Significant results
The most significant result of WP6 is demonstrated in the fact that the collaboration between partners was excellent.
The SCINTILLA project management was carried out on a day-to-day basis, relying on web-based tools available at all times to all partners. The management bodies met on a regular basis. More precisely, to monitor the project, a risk register was regularly updated (first iteration shared with the EC through DL622, a second iteration was shared with the EC through DL623). Periodic reports were prepared by all partners, coordinated by the Project Office and submitted on time.
No deviations

Potential Impact:
The comprehensive SCINTILLA Toolbox includes new and improved technologies for the detection of difficult-to-detect radioactive sources and nuclear materials, together with guidelines for their usage. It thereby contributes to minimising the risk of use or dissemination of such substances in the population. Also, by proposing effective substitutes for Helium-3 in neutron detectors, SCINTILLA contributes to the resolution of a strategic threat to Europe, i.e. the increasing difficulty to procure Helium-3 for the current generation of RPM.
During its lifespan, SCINTILLA covered a broad range of different use cases defined at its start and assessed at project end. Those use cases included automatic screening of moving targets such as people, cars and trucks, the inspection of large containers as well as the detection of radioactive sources in bombs. Special attention was paid to the management of crowds and public spaces where SCINTILLA now proposes communicating networks of miniature CZT devices able to detect and identify threats. In addition to more technical criteria such as sensitivity, discrimination between neutron and gamma radiation and the minimisation of false alarms, SCINTILLA assessed its developed technologies with respect to practical criteria such as portability, mobility and cost-benefit ratios.
The SCINTILLA Testbed services and regular Technology Benchmarks assured that the SCINTILLA Toolbox stayed open to best-of-breed technologies and new developments. The iterative process allowed regular improvements of the developments and prototypes. This led to reach the stage of a commercial product for one of the developed technology in response to a strong market demand. Indeed, the regular interaction with end-users allowed to stick to market constraints and demand.
Last but not least, the building of a SCINTILLA Partnership Network (SPN), a worldwide community of interest around shielded nuclear material identification and detection gathering stakeholders including end-users, technology providers and scientists, aimed at ensuring that Europe stays at the front of this area which is critical for the security of Europe and its citizens. If this can be considered as a success during the project lifetime, it did not prove economically sustainable beyond SCINTILLA. However, the already existing community, resulting from 3 years of networking through SCINTILLA, will partly be maintained through other emerging communities within FP7 or H2020 projects in related domains (e.g. nuclear detection, CBRN, non-destructives inspection, crisis management,…). Indeed, the SCINTILLA partners in charge of dissemination activities encouraged such future of the SPN. As an example, SPN members expressed their interest in joining the FP7-DRIVER community that deals with crisis management. Similar interest was also expressed by a few SCINTILLA partners in the EDEN Project dealing with CBRNE. As EDEN aims at leveraging the added-value of tools and systems from previous research projects and development efforts, it comes as a natural follow up of the SCINTILLA Project to make available the SCINTILLA technologies for the willing partners. Also, this is the opportunity to benefit once more from a platform linking end-users, the research community and industrials.

Specific individual plans for exploitation of project results are summarised below:
Partner Planned use of project results
CEA For CEA LIST, the licence agreements with industrial partners IMS and SAPHYMO are an important issue for exploitation of the SCINTILLA project results. The signature of the licence between CEA and IMS Company was done in 2014. The SAPHYMO Company should be involved in two additional licences in 2015. The two patents submitted by CEA during the project are fundamental for the next years developments. After SCINTILLA, future H2020 cooperation, ANR, and industrial cooperation programmes are clearly strengthened.
CEA LETI’s strategy is focused on declared patents relative to CZT gamma-camera technology. The most relevant outcomes for exploitation are related to task 2.1 and are real-time deconvolution algorithm and the N42.42 interface that were both developed for SCINTILLA.
At CEA DEN, the strategy is to exploit the POLITRANI computer code for light pulse simulation in organic scintillators developed within SCINTILLA, in the field of radioactive waste package characterization. A PhD thesis has been launched in the end of 2014 at the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA DEN Cadarache, to develop passive neutron coincidence counting with plastic scintillators in replacement of 3He detectors.
JRC JRC has increased during SCINTILLA its testing capability, extending from the pre-existing ITRAP experience. JRC aims to consolidate its leadership position in Europe as tester and evaluator of nuclear security equipment and will continue to make available its facility to the community for this purpose.
INFN The main exploitation objective of INFN and ANN is to increase their visibility in the field of nuclear security via the dissemination of the results obtained during the project with the Gd-Lined scintillator RPM system. INFN and ANN plan to perform test of the new RPM in a real-life environment by installing the apparatus in a port in Italy.

ANSALDO
EK EK will continue to make available their laboratory to provide test facilities, nuclear materials, and background knowledge to scientific institutions and public companies.
ARTTIC ARTTIC is a management services firm specialised in the support and building of collaborative RTD projects, their execution and the optimisation of their impact. ARTTIC does not intend to exploit the results of the SCINTILLA project. However the contacts developed in the SCINTILLA consortium, the SPN, and the reputation ARTTIC has developed for its third party project management and dissemination services in SCINTILLA have already led to follow-up business.
SAPHYMO SAPHYMO has collected lot of data during the Testbed activities. These data and all experimentations done for SCINTILLA will be used to improve current products and new products of SAPHYMO. This will especially be the case for the vehicle RPM systems.
SYMETRICA SYMETRICA’s technology development strategy is to develop IP under its own internal research funding. This enables SYMETRICA to maintain and develop background IP and to apply and optimise that IP within development programmes. SYMETRICA has already commercialised detectors tested during the first benchmark and will continue this process for many of the other system developed during the project. This has been further aided by the network of users and experts that have been developed during the project.

List of Websites:
SCINTILLA Project partners
Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives France RTD
Joint Research Centre – European Commission Belgium RTD
Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Italy RTD
Ansaldo Nucleare SPA Italy SME
Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia Energiatudomanyi Kutatokozpont Hungary Gov.
Fraunhofer-Gesellshaft zur Foerderung der Angewandten Forschung E.V. Germany RTD
ARTTIC France SME
SAPHYMO SAS France SME
SYMETRICA Security Ltd United Kingdom SME
Contact details:
Project Coordinator – CEA
Guillaume Sannié
+33 (0)1 69 08 51 88
guillaume.sannie@cea.fr

Project Office – ARTTIC
Christian Baumhauer
+33 (0)1 53 94 54 77
christian.baumhauer@arttic.eu
Tiphaine Deheunynck
+33 (0)1 53 94 54 82
deheunynck@arttic.eu
Elizabeth Haddad
+33 (0)1 53 94 54 84
haddad@arttic.eu

SCINTILLA project public website: www.scintilla-project.eu