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MYOELECTRIC INTERFACING WITH SENSORY-MOTOR INTEGRATION

Objective

Biological signals recorded from the human body can be translated into actions of external devices to create man-machine interaction. This concept has clinical implications in rehabilitation technologies for replacing or recovering impaired motor functions. Among the possible biosignals for man-machine interaction (brain, nerve, and muscle signals), muscle signals, i.e. electromyography (EMG), are the only that allow applications in routine clinical use within a commercially reasonable time horizon. Although the current efforts in myoelectric interfaces are mainly focusing on decoding EMG signals, myoelectric interaction has the unique and little exploited feature of provoking changes in the neural circuits that are active during the interaction, i.e. of artificially inducing brain plasticity. However, current commercially viable myoelecric interfaces do not implement sensory-motor integration (decoding intentions and at the same time providing a sensory feedback to the patient), which conversely is the basis of plasticity of the central nervous system. This limit reflects the gap between academic research and the clinical and commercial needs. Myoelectric interfacing with sensory-motor integration is indeed feasible now if the knowledge from basic neurophysiology research and signal analysis in the academia is transferred to industrial sectors and if the requirements of and testing for clinical and commercial viability are transferred from the industry to academia. With a consortium of internationally regarded European academic teams and industries, we thus propose the implementation of sensory-motor integration into commercially viable myoelectric devices in two key clinical applications: 1) training for the active control of prostheses; and 2) rehabilitation of stroke patients with robotics. These two areas require a similar technological ground for sensory-motor integration and for artificial induction of neural plasticity, necessary to (re)learn motor tasks.

Field of science

  • /medical and health sciences/clinical medicine/physiotherapy

Call for proposal

FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IAPP
See other projects for this call

Funding Scheme

MC-IAPP - Industry-Academia Partnerships and Pathways (IAPP)

Coordinator

UNIVERSITAETSMEDIZIN GOETTINGEN - GEORG-AUGUST-UNIVERSITAET GOETTINGEN - STIFTUNG OEFFENTLICHEN RECHTS
Address
Robert-koch-strasse 40
37075 Goettingen
Germany
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
EU contribution
€ 537 642
Administrative Contact
Christiane Hennecke (Ms.)

Participants (4)

FONDAZIONE OSPEDALE SAN CAMILLO
Italy
EU contribution
€ 228 396
Address
Via Alberoni 70
30126 Venezia
Activity type
Research Organisations
Administrative Contact
Viviana Zanin (Dr.)
OTTOBOCK SE & CO. KGAA
Germany
EU contribution
€ 505 734
Address
Max-nader-strasse 15
37115 Duderstadt
Activity type
Private for-profit entities (excluding Higher or Secondary Education Establishments)
Administrative Contact
Dirk Nachtwey (Mr.)
FERROBOTICS COMPLIANT ROBOT TECHNOLOGY GMBH
Austria
EU contribution
€ 238 072
Address
Altenbergerstrasse 69
4040 Linz
Activity type
Private for-profit entities (excluding Higher or Secondary Education Establishments)
Administrative Contact
Paolo Ferrara (Dr.)
TYROMOTION GMBH
Austria
EU contribution
€ 218 822
Address
Bahnhofgurtel 59
8020 Graz
Activity type
Private for-profit entities (excluding Higher or Secondary Education Establishments)
Administrative Contact
Nicole Manninger (Ms.)