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ERC = ScienceSquared

Deliverables

Pop-up Science Stands

• Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, parks, festivals, etc. (to be chosen by third parties). These stands will have a creative and striking design and will be filled with activities on a selected topic. In addition to all the communication vehicles produced by the consortium, the stands will be equipped with some experiments, products and demonstrations. Kits for each selected topic could be developed. Each kit might be composed of 3 kinds of activities: experiences, small objects to “tease” the public’s curiosity and a collection of topics to be discussed. Passers-by will be able to engage with short 10-20-minute experiences where their curiosity will be sparked. The stand will be given a catchy name and its travels around Europe will be followed and disseminated through social media. Ecsite will work with designers to produce it and The Pavilion will be involved in designing the kits and activities to be used at the stand.

Production of 'a cluster of content' (1)

Science|Business will coordinate the development of the content – producing interactive journalistic pieces (‘snowfall’) and commissioning modules of graphic design, video, etc. to contractors when necessary. Where possible, the content will complement work already underway in the ERC’s in-house communications unit – so that we expand the overall ‘voiceprint’ of the ERC, rather than duplicate or contradict internal activities. All materials will be originally produced in English but these modules will be adapted to their target audiences when needed. A sub-set of the university members and museums will provide translation of the content into their local languages. Dependent on the museums and universities most actively engaged under each theme, materials made available to third parties will be translated in at least two other languages. The campaign will be supported by four types of ‘communications vehicles': Snowfalls: Each content package will have, at its core, a rich, interactive set of online articles. It starts with one long, high-quality article on the theme of the package (for instance: How do we sense the world around us?) This would be presented with striking photography, art and interactive features that invite readers to explore. The model for this is a journalistic form pioneered a few years ago by the New York Times, about the death of a group of skiers during an avalanche (hence, the generic term that followed: a ‘snowfall’) Science|Business has successfully produced these for other clients. But the main article is just the start: Linked to it would be a series of other articles and resources with increasing technical sophistication, such as articles about the individual research projects, our other content (below), other ERC resources on the topic and, ultimately, journals or other specialist publications. Throughout, the ERC brand is visible. The result: A world of science to explore at varying levels of sophistication, with multiple entry points for different audience segments. Videos: Each selected project will be featured in short (about 90 seconds), inspirational but “graspable” pieces. The videos must grab the attention of the younger and general audience – and be understandable - from the start. That means they must begin with something striking: images, questions, a storyline, humour – whatever works to entice viewers. They move next to a bit of explanation and science about the topic, and end with an ERC plug. The specifics will differ by project. As explained earlier, a segment on sensory perception could start with a clip of a synaesthete (who confuses different sensory channels) or a close-up of cute mouse whiskers – that quickly segue into a few short points about the science behind it all. There could be a narrative based around an interview with a “cool” contributor – this may be an expert, the grantee him/herself, an exponent of whatever the tech is enabling, an undergraduate or even a secondary school student who is following and actively experimenting with the subject and is passionate about it. Augmented reality products: An expert company will design, develop and deploy an app featuring augmented reality (AR) that will dynamically bring the virtual and real worlds together. Its purpose is to provide a unique and enriching tool to entice people. The aim: to promote the ‘cool science’ generated by the ERC funding schemes. When showing a subject with partial augmentation, it is easier to generate audience interest through visuals kinaesthetics that can be easily retained. Augmented reality still being a young technology, the novelty in the Science Plug-Ins will generate a viral effect and enhance a unique pedagogical experience about the science tackled by the projects selected within each thematic area. So how will this work in practice? Once a research project is chosen, a viewer will point a smartphone or tablet at a triggering image – printed

ERC=ScienceSquared Social Media Platforms

Lead partner: Science|Business Other participants: all partners In order to ensure broad distribution while still targeting audience segments, the consortium will exploit social media as an increasingly popular platform for science. This will enable us to reach new audiences that have less interest in conventional media channels, and to interact with people who consume information through multi-media on a regular basis. The campaign will establish its own branded platforms on YouTube, Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter and Vine. It will also seek to incorporate influential bloggers, Tweeters and YouTubers at a local, national and international level by proactively engaging with them on topics most relevant to their followers and providing a resource of readily available and packaged content for re-distribution. In addition to the activities carried out by the museums and science centres, social media will assist in reaching a younger audience more attuned to smaller clips of information, while creating a bridge to more traditional media content such as articles and discussions. Social media have had a very powerful presence in popular science and will continue to be an increasingly viable option for researchers to get their work out to a larger public. One of the most obvious examples of the successful use of this platform is the website IFLScience. Within less than 3 years of being on Facebook, IFLScience (http://www.iflscience.com/) has registered over 18 million likes and always ranks among the top of Facebook’s engagements statistics due to the large amount of discussion generated by individual posts. A more European-focused example is the online organisation Maldiinfo (http://network.mladiinfo.eu). It currently operates in eight countries throughout eastern and central Europe and caters to a younger audience. The goal of the organisation is to promote possibilities for formal and informal education and scientific-research work, as well as help students, researchers and science workers get scholarships, grants and entry to diverse conferences and trainings. They currently have more than 145,000 visits per month to the website, 15,000 subscribers to their newsletter and around 50,000 fans and friends on Facebook and Twitter. These are just two examples of the resources readily available on this platform. Many sites in this category, including IFLScience, operate with a single author. In order to stay relevant and current, these authors are in constant need of free content to publish on their sites. A key aspect in producing content for the ERC is to do it in a way that it is neatly prepared for immediate distribution on a range of social media. We believe that a lot of the research being funded by the ERC can have mass audience appeal if it is packaged correctly. SCIENCE IN SOCIAL MEDIA: Big audiences, great potential for the ERC Momentum for the ERC = Science² social media campaign will be developed by regular postings of a mix of themes, formats (video, articles, tweets, cartoons, ambassador testimonials, etc.) from the consortium, content created by the grantees and host institutions, and content from external social media sites that fits the narrative. This mix is essential to maintain fresh and varied content to drive traffic to the website and other associated platforms. It is important to note that not every blog or Twitter account holder is going to be interested in all of the themes or formats we produce. Relevant external content will help to fill any gaps that may occur throughout the campaign and help to build a loyal following. Today, the ERC Facebook has 6787 likes and 446 visits, the ERC Twitter has 873 Tweets and 11,400 followers, the ERC linkedIn page has 405 followers. Conscious that the ERC is already active on several social media channels, we won’t be looking at diverting the current ERC audience. On the contrary, we will aim to produce quality content that will, if the ERC decides so, supplement t

Production of a 'cluster of content' (5)

Science|Business will coordinate the development of the content – producing interactive journalistic pieces (‘snowfall’) and commissioning modules of graphic design, video, etc. to contractors when necessary. Where possible, the content will complement work already underway in the ERC’s in-house communications unit – so that we expand the overall ‘voiceprint’ of the ERC, rather than duplicate or contradict internal activities. All materials will be originally produced in English but these modules will be adapted to their target audiences when needed. A sub-set of the university members and museums will provide translation of the content into their local languages. Dependent on the museums and universities most actively engaged under each theme, materials made available to third parties will be translated in at least two other languages. The campaign will be supported by four types of ‘communications vehicles': Snowfalls: Each content package will have, at its core, a rich, interactive set of online articles. It starts with one long, high-quality article on the theme of the package (for instance: How do we sense the world around us?) This would be presented with striking photography, art and interactive features that invite readers to explore. The model for this is a journalistic form pioneered a few years ago by the New York Times, about the death of a group of skiers during an avalanche (hence, the generic term that followed: a ‘snowfall’) Science|Business has successfully produced these for other clients. But the main article is just the start: Linked to it would be a series of other articles and resources with increasing technical sophistication, such as articles about the individual research projects, our other content (below), other ERC resources on the topic and, ultimately, journals or other specialist publications. Throughout, the ERC brand is visible. The result: A world of science to explore at varying levels of sophistication, with multiple entry points for different audience segments. Videos: Each selected project will be featured in short (about 90 seconds), inspirational but “graspable” pieces. The videos must grab the attention of the younger and general audience – and be understandable - from the start. That means they must begin with something striking: images, questions, a storyline, humour – whatever works to entice viewers. They move next to a bit of explanation and science about the topic, and end with an ERC plug. The specifics will differ by project. As explained earlier, a segment on sensory perception could start with a clip of a synaesthete (who confuses different sensory channels) or a close-up of cute mouse whiskers – that quickly segue into a few short points about the science behind it all. There could be a narrative based around an interview with a “cool” contributor – this may be an expert, the grantee him/herself, an exponent of whatever the tech is enabling, an undergraduate or even a secondary school student who is following and actively experimenting with the subject and is passionate about it. Augmented reality products: An expert company will design, develop and deploy an app featuring augmented reality (AR) that will dynamically bring the virtual and real worlds together. Its purpose is to provide a unique and enriching tool to entice people. The aim: to promote the ‘cool science’ generated by the ERC funding schemes. When showing a subject with partial augmentation, it is easier to generate audience interest through visuals kinaesthetics that can be easily retained. Augmented reality still being a young technology, the novelty in the Science Plug-Ins will generate a viral effect and enhance a unique pedagogical experience about the science tackled by the projects selected within each thematic area. So how will this work in practice? Once a research project is chosen, a viewer will point a smartphone or tablet at a triggering image – printed

Production of 'a cluster of content' (4)

Science|Business will coordinate the development of the content – producing interactive journalistic pieces (‘snowfall’) and commissioning modules of graphic design, video, etc. to contractors when necessary. Where possible, the content will complement work already underway in the ERC’s in-house communications unit – so that we expand the overall ‘voiceprint’ of the ERC, rather than duplicate or contradict internal activities. All materials will be originally produced in English but these modules will be adapted to their target audiences when needed. A sub-set of the university members and museums will provide translation of the content into their local languages. Dependent on the museums and universities most actively engaged under each theme, materials made available to third parties will be translated in at least two other languages. The campaign will be supported by four types of ‘communications vehicles': Snowfalls: Each content package will have, at its core, a rich, interactive set of online articles. It starts with one long, high-quality article on the theme of the package (for instance: How do we sense the world around us?) This would be presented with striking photography, art and interactive features that invite readers to explore. The model for this is a journalistic form pioneered a few years ago by the New York Times, about the death of a group of skiers during an avalanche (hence, the generic term that followed: a ‘snowfall’) Science|Business has successfully produced these for other clients. But the main article is just the start: Linked to it would be a series of other articles and resources with increasing technical sophistication, such as articles about the individual research projects, our other content (below), other ERC resources on the topic and, ultimately, journals or other specialist publications. Throughout, the ERC brand is visible. The result: A world of science to explore at varying levels of sophistication, with multiple entry points for different audience segments. Videos: Each selected project will be featured in short (about 90 seconds), inspirational but “graspable” pieces. The videos must grab the attention of the younger and general audience – and be understandable - from the start. That means they must begin with something striking: images, questions, a storyline, humour – whatever works to entice viewers. They move next to a bit of explanation and science about the topic, and end with an ERC plug. The specifics will differ by project. As explained earlier, a segment on sensory perception could start with a clip of a synaesthete (who confuses different sensory channels) or a close-up of cute mouse whiskers – that quickly segue into a few short points about the science behind it all. There could be a narrative based around an interview with a “cool” contributor – this may be an expert, the grantee him/herself, an exponent of whatever the tech is enabling, an undergraduate or even a secondary school student who is following and actively experimenting with the subject and is passionate about it. Augmented reality products: An expert company will design, develop and deploy an app featuring augmented reality (AR) that will dynamically bring the virtual and real worlds together. Its purpose is to provide a unique and enriching tool to entice people. The aim: to promote the ‘cool science’ generated by the ERC funding schemes. When showing a subject with partial augmentation, it is easier to generate audience interest through visuals kinaesthetics that can be easily retained. Augmented reality still being a young technology, the novelty in the Science Plug-Ins will generate a viral effect and enhance a unique pedagogical experience about the science tackled by the projects selected within each thematic area. So how will this work in practice? Once a research project is chosen, a viewer will point a smartphone or tablet at a triggering image – printed

Production of 'a cluster of content' (2)

Science|Business will coordinate the development of the content – producing interactive journalistic pieces (‘snowfall’) and commissioning modules of graphic design, video, etc. to contractors when necessary. Where possible, the content will complement work already underway in the ERC’s in-house communications unit – so that we expand the overall ‘voiceprint’ of the ERC, rather than duplicate or contradict internal activities. All materials will be originally produced in English but these modules will be adapted to their target audiences when needed. A sub-set of the university members and museums will provide translation of the content into their local languages. Dependent on the museums and universities most actively engaged under each theme, materials made available to third parties will be translated in at least two other languages. The campaign will be supported by four types of ‘communications vehicles': Snowfalls: Each content package will have, at its core, a rich, interactive set of online articles. It starts with one long, high-quality article on the theme of the package (for instance: How do we sense the world around us?) This would be presented with striking photography, art and interactive features that invite readers to explore. The model for this is a journalistic form pioneered a few years ago by the New York Times, about the death of a group of skiers during an avalanche (hence, the generic term that followed: a ‘snowfall’) Science|Business has successfully produced these for other clients. But the main article is just the start: Linked to it would be a series of other articles and resources with increasing technical sophistication, such as articles about the individual research projects, our other content (below), other ERC resources on the topic and, ultimately, journals or other specialist publications. Throughout, the ERC brand is visible. The result: A world of science to explore at varying levels of sophistication, with multiple entry points for different audience segments. Videos: Each selected project will be featured in short (about 90 seconds), inspirational but “graspable” pieces. The videos must grab the attention of the younger and general audience – and be understandable - from the start. That means they must begin with something striking: images, questions, a storyline, humour – whatever works to entice viewers. They move next to a bit of explanation and science about the topic, and end with an ERC plug. The specifics will differ by project. As explained earlier, a segment on sensory perception could start with a clip of a synaesthete (who confuses different sensory channels) or a close-up of cute mouse whiskers – that quickly segue into a few short points about the science behind it all. There could be a narrative based around an interview with a “cool” contributor – this may be an expert, the grantee him/herself, an exponent of whatever the tech is enabling, an undergraduate or even a secondary school student who is following and actively experimenting with the subject and is passionate about it. Augmented reality products: An expert company will design, develop and deploy an app featuring augmented reality (AR) that will dynamically bring the virtual and real worlds together. Its purpose is to provide a unique and enriching tool to entice people. The aim: to promote the ‘cool science’ generated by the ERC funding schemes. When showing a subject with partial augmentation, it is easier to generate audience interest through visuals kinaesthetics that can be easily retained. Augmented reality still being a young technology, the novelty in the Science Plug-Ins will generate a viral effect and enhance a unique pedagogical experience about the science tackled by the projects selected within each thematic area. So how will this work in practice? Once a research project is chosen, a viewer will point a smartphone or tablet at a triggering image – printed

Policy Events

For the ERC, a small but vital audience is in the policy community: Those officials, in Brussels and the member-state capitals, who have a voice in how science develops in Europe. We are not suggesting lobbying them; we are, instead, proposing to keep them well informed about ERC progress, and in the member-states encouraging their help in getting a good, well distributed, flow of applicants from across the EU, north and south, east and west. For this, nothing beats well-planned events: small policy dinners, roundtables and highlights in large conferences that policy makers frequent. Science|Business is ideally placed to coordinate these events; it organises more than 20 such events a year in Brussels and other EU capitals, all focused on science or technology themes. All are attended by the most senior officials: member-state ministers and permanent representatives; MEPs; and Commission directors, directors-general, members of cabinet and Commissioners. They are joined by senior academics and technology executives, ensuring a lively mix of view and debate. The format can be a small dinner, a large Webcast, or a half-day policy symposium. A major aspect of Science|Business event planning and organisation is the media content that comes before, during and after the event. We think through the communications strategy for every event - with rapporteurs, briefing papers, research reports, newsletters or whatever else is appropriate to the occasion. While Science|Business events are often exclusive, they also have a public message projected during or after. The events do not happen in a vacuum. When appropriate, we will take the materials generated and filter them through many of the distribution channels mentioned in WP3 – Building an online audience. One of the basic principles is that the events must always be interactive; good thinking requires dialogue, not monologue. This also differentiates us from the normal Brussels fare. Over the years, we have received public mentions from key EU figures. In this context, Science|Business will coordinate a series of policy events, in Brussels and selected European cities, about the policy options opened by ERC scientific discoveries. The general message: ERC science can be a game-changer for Europe. Throughout the project’s duration, Science|Business will offer a high-level platform for the ERC ambassadors and ERC staff to interact with key innovation stakeholders including policy makers at EU, national, regional levels, rectors and deans, universities’ EU offices, tech transfer offices, business executives, innovation directors, etc. The event types: • Science Plug-ins and dinners. In Brussels and selected capitals, we will organise at least one high-level policy event per year, organised around themes connected to timely policy debates. For the sensory theme, for instance, we will organise a high-level dinner that would, quite literally, include a menu related to the ERC research, a few short (10 minute) talks by at least three of the grantees, and then a table-wide discussion about the policy implications of this research for the management of sensory disabilities by European healthcare systems. For some especially topical themes, we will organise a 90-minute ERC = Science² event, in which 3 or 4 especially well-spoken grantees give short, TED-style talks, followed by discussion, with policy makers. The dinners will be stand-alone activities; the Plug-Ins would often be plenary sessions added to other Science|Business science policy conferences, such as our annual Horizon 2020 Webcast conference. In essence, with these events, we would be showing the importance of basic research in providing evidence to guide policy – and demonstrating how much scientific breakthroughs can change the whole nature of a policy debate. • Proof of Concept investor sessions. The PoC programme is a special challenge for communications. The grantees’ targets are very precise: The few h

DIY Media Kit

The consortium will distribute a social media do-it-yourself (DIY) kit, to inform the grantees of what their options are for participating in the ERC = Science² campaign. We believe that they will be most active on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook, but they will also know that the door is open to participate at any level and how they can make suggestions or contribute in English or their native language. Part of the social media DIY kit will be dedicated to encouraging the grantees to produce individual Vines. Vines are easy to create, short videos of three to six seconds that play on a continuous loop and can be shared instantly on Twitter, YouTube, or embedded on a site. The grantees will have free range to highlight a prototype, briefly discuss their work or handle production in any way they see fit. This is a free, creative and limitless process. Production of these videos will also be spread across the complementary social media platforms and posted on YouTube. We believe that it is important for the grantees to have direct contact with the wider public, should they be interested.

DIY Communication Materials

With the DIY kits distributed to a wide range of ERC grantees, it is anticipated that the content they are able to produce will be fed into different social media platforms. This includes updated on twitter, youtube, the ERC=ScienceSquared website and more.

ERC Dedicated Website

To promote the campaign and centralise all materials produced, the consortium will create an ERC = Science2 website. Along with segmenting and organising the individual products such as snowfalls, augmented reality packages, articles, illustrations, videos, etc., the website will feature up-to-date and immediate access to all materials produced for the partners, third parties, grantees, host institutions and the general public. It will be used as a reference point for events taking place across Europe and also act as a point of contact for the campaign and its partners. It will host direct links to the various social media platforms the campaign will organise and link external views to the sites of all partners and third party participants. Once the ERC = Science2 campaign is completed, the ERC will be given control of the site to make use of the relevant content.

Production of 'a cluster of content' (3)

Science|Business will coordinate the development of the content – producing interactive journalistic pieces (‘snowfall’) and commissioning modules of graphic design, video, etc. to contractors when necessary. Where possible, the content will complement work already underway in the ERC’s in-house communications unit – so that we expand the overall ‘voiceprint’ of the ERC, rather than duplicate or contradict internal activities. All materials will be originally produced in English but these modules will be adapted to their target audiences when needed. A sub-set of the university members and museums will provide translation of the content into their local languages. Dependent on the museums and universities most actively engaged under each theme, materials made available to third parties will be translated in at least two other languages. The campaign will be supported by four types of ‘communications vehicles': Snowfalls: Each content package will have, at its core, a rich, interactive set of online articles. It starts with one long, high-quality article on the theme of the package (for instance: How do we sense the world around us?) This would be presented with striking photography, art and interactive features that invite readers to explore. The model for this is a journalistic form pioneered a few years ago by the New York Times, about the death of a group of skiers during an avalanche (hence, the generic term that followed: a ‘snowfall’) Science|Business has successfully produced these for other clients. But the main article is just the start: Linked to it would be a series of other articles and resources with increasing technical sophistication, such as articles about the individual research projects, our other content (below), other ERC resources on the topic and, ultimately, journals or other specialist publications. Throughout, the ERC brand is visible. The result: A world of science to explore at varying levels of sophistication, with multiple entry points for different audience segments. Videos: Each selected project will be featured in short (about 90 seconds), inspirational but “graspable” pieces. The videos must grab the attention of the younger and general audience – and be understandable - from the start. That means they must begin with something striking: images, questions, a storyline, humour – whatever works to entice viewers. They move next to a bit of explanation and science about the topic, and end with an ERC plug. The specifics will differ by project. As explained earlier, a segment on sensory perception could start with a clip of a synaesthete (who confuses different sensory channels) or a close-up of cute mouse whiskers – that quickly segue into a few short points about the science behind it all. There could be a narrative based around an interview with a “cool” contributor – this may be an expert, the grantee him/herself, an exponent of whatever the tech is enabling, an undergraduate or even a secondary school student who is following and actively experimenting with the subject and is passionate about it. Augmented reality products: An expert company will design, develop and deploy an app featuring augmented reality (AR) that will dynamically bring the virtual and real worlds together. Its purpose is to provide a unique and enriching tool to entice people. The aim: to promote the ‘cool science’ generated by the ERC funding schemes. When showing a subject with partial augmentation, it is easier to generate audience interest through visuals kinaesthetics that can be easily retained. Augmented reality still being a young technology, the novelty in the Science Plug-Ins will generate a viral effect and enhance a unique pedagogical experience about the science tackled by the projects selected within each thematic area. So how will this work in practice? Once a research project is chosen, a viewer will point a smartphone or tablet at a triggering image – printed

Elevator Pitch Session

• Proof of Concept investor sessions. The PoC programme is a special challenge for communications. The grantees’ targets are very precise: The few hundred people around Europe who might be interested in investing in their projects or companies. For that, a classic ‘elevator pitch’ session to an audience of these potential investors is ideal: It frames the grantees as investable properties, provides a setting for direct networking with investors, and helps the grantees hone their sales skills. Science|Business has provided this setting for PoC grantees in February 2013 and July2014 – to great success. The format we propose is to provide a half-day pitch training session to a group of 5 grantees, and have them deliver their 3-minute elevator-pitch session in front of potential investors who will vote on the best one. With a large, Chinese gong, we keep the grantees to exactly the 3-minute limit of an investor elevator pitch. Based on our experience, we will focus our audience recruitment on angel and corporate investors with an interest in early-stage technologies, and group the grantees by broad sector (life sciences, ICT, etc.) We will vary the location and format during this contract, most often going either to major investment capitals or bolting the pitch session onto large investor events, such as annual meetings of the Science|Business Network, the European Industrial Research Managers Association and the European Business Angels Network.

Production of a 'cluster of content' (6)

Science|Business will coordinate the development of the content – producing interactive journalistic pieces (‘snowfall’) and commissioning modules of graphic design, video, etc. to contractors when necessary. Where possible, the content will complement work already underway in the ERC’s in-house communications unit – so that we expand the overall ‘voiceprint’ of the ERC, rather than duplicate or contradict internal activities. All materials will be originally produced in English but these modules will be adapted to their target audiences when needed. A sub-set of the university members and museums will provide translation of the content into their local languages. Dependent on the museums and universities most actively engaged under each theme, materials made available to third parties will be translated in at least two other languages. The campaign will be supported by four types of ‘communications vehicles': Snowfalls: Each content package will have, at its core, a rich, interactive set of online articles. It starts with one long, high-quality article on the theme of the package (for instance: How do we sense the world around us?) This would be presented with striking photography, art and interactive features that invite readers to explore. The model for this is a journalistic form pioneered a few years ago by the New York Times, about the death of a group of skiers during an avalanche (hence, the generic term that followed: a ‘snowfall’) Science|Business has successfully produced these for other clients. But the main article is just the start: Linked to it would be a series of other articles and resources with increasing technical sophistication, such as articles about the individual research projects, our other content (below), other ERC resources on the topic and, ultimately, journals or other specialist publications. Throughout, the ERC brand is visible. The result: A world of science to explore at varying levels of sophistication, with multiple entry points for different audience segments. Videos: Each selected project will be featured in short (about 90 seconds), inspirational but “graspable” pieces. The videos must grab the attention of the younger and general audience – and be understandable - from the start. That means they must begin with something striking: images, questions, a storyline, humour – whatever works to entice viewers. They move next to a bit of explanation and science about the topic, and end with an ERC plug. The specifics will differ by project. As explained earlier, a segment on sensory perception could start with a clip of a synaesthete (who confuses different sensory channels) or a close-up of cute mouse whiskers – that quickly segue into a few short points about the science behind it all. There could be a narrative based around an interview with a “cool” contributor – this may be an expert, the grantee him/herself, an exponent of whatever the tech is enabling, an undergraduate or even a secondary school student who is following and actively experimenting with the subject and is passionate about it. Augmented reality products: An expert company will design, develop and deploy an app featuring augmented reality (AR) that will dynamically bring the virtual and real worlds together. Its purpose is to provide a unique and enriching tool to entice people. The aim: to promote the ‘cool science’ generated by the ERC funding schemes. When showing a subject with partial augmentation, it is easier to generate audience interest through visuals kinaesthetics that can be easily retained. Augmented reality still being a young technology, the novelty in the Science Plug-Ins will generate a viral effect and enhance a unique pedagogical experience about the science tackled by the projects selected within each thematic area. So how will this work in practice? Once a research project is chosen, a viewer will point a smartphone or tablet at a triggering image – printed

A Pool of 50 Grantees

By the end of the project, there will be a pool of around 50 grantees (15 featured in the Science Plug-Ins, 20 PoC grantees and about 15 other grantees to be involved in local activities and policy events. The group will grow gradually throughout the duration of the project.

Thematic articles

Step 1. Find the projects, and build a coherent story linking them Using sensory research as an example, we would start with a set of related projects. For instance, on a molecular level, what is happening when we touch or smell something? An ERC grantee in Italy is using optogenetics to study how a rat’s whiskers generate neural impulses that help the animal form a spatial map of the world around it. A researcher, at Groeningen in the Netherlands, is studying how the membrane proteins in a common bacteria change when the creature ‘bumps’ into something – a phenomenon called mechanosensation. Another researcher, in Trondheim in Norway, is looking at the neural circuits inside zebrafish to see how they perceive a smell or taste. Yet another, in Britain: Examining how different sensations come together in the mind to form an overall picture, by studying synaesthetes (people who get the sensations mixed up.) And finally, from Stockholm: How do we combine all these senses to know where our own body parts are? Individually, each of these projects is answering an interesting question. But together, they start to tell a comprehensive story – a story that the ERC is writing – about how we sense the world. Each of our Science Plug-Ins would begin with a similar collection of thematically related projects, guided by our Advisory Board.

'Menu' of Activities for Science Centres and Museums (5)

Ciência Viva will take a lead on the design of activities that will be implemented by Ecsite’s third parties (Ecsite member museums) across Europe. Based on the stories (such as the sensory package), social events and ‘science experiences’ in science museums will be created. Videos, cartoons, augmented reality products and ERC grantees themselves become vehicles to tell ERC stories to a wider audience. In short, Ciência Viva will take the content packages developed by Science|Business for online and media distribution, and translate them into displays, activities and debates suitable for use in science museums, in local languages, to reach a wider set of the general public. Once the key six themes are set, Ecsite will collect the information from the Third Parties on their preferred topics and timing for the activities. Then the Ciênca Viva together with Ecsite will start developing activities for Third parties based on the topics they have chosen. Each science centre will cover two broad topics with a selection of activities. Three types of activities will be offered with two compulsory and one optional: • Dialogue activities inside science centres/museums. Museums will have the liberty to implement dialogue activities they are accustomed to running, or choose among a ‘menu of activities’ that will include discussion games such as PlayDecide and Science Cafés. PlayDecide games developed as part of the FP7 project FUND have since been widely used within the science communication community. The games are designed to facilitate the take-up of participatory methods, exchange experiences and knowledge. Through dialogue and listening to different points of view the participants realise the complexity of policymaking. PlayDecide is a proven method to stimulate debates and policy positions of a given group on controversial scientific topics. The results of the games played will be uploaded on the dedicated website (www.playdecide.eu) thus allowing for comparisons of views between different countries. Currently games on around 50 different topics have been created and many of them are translated into multiple languages. Topics such as nanotechnology, stem cells, climate change, healthy diet and lifestyle and many more already exist. ERC funded projects grouped around one of these topics could be presented in a discussion through these games. Once the themes of the project are decided, all available playdecide games will be screened, selected and adapted if needed, in the language of participating science museums. Science Cafes or Café Scientifiques are well-known and widely used formats. They are places where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafes, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context. Science Cafe is a forum for the discussion of important and interesting scientific issues. They are informal and accessible - much more so than a public lecture. Audiences consist of people who are interested in science but generally never have the opportunity to discuss their views and ask questions. Topics have included AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, climate change, Darwinism, evolution, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology. There are multiple variations of science cafes such as world café or a reverse science café. Depending on the topics, suitable adaptations of the formats will be made. The two activities above are given as an example and the formats may be adapted depending on the research topics chosen by the project. However their main objective – to discuss scientific issues in an accessible and informal way will remain. When available, ERC grantees will be invited to collaborate. • Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, parks, festivals, etc. (to be chosen by third parties

'Menu' of Activities for Science Centres and Museums (2)

Ciência Viva will take a lead on the design of activities that will be implemented by Ecsite’s third parties (Ecsite member museums) across Europe. Based on the stories (such as the sensory package), social events and ‘science experiences’ in science museums will be created. Videos, cartoons, augmented reality products and ERC grantees themselves become vehicles to tell ERC stories to a wider audience. In short, Ciência Viva will take the content packages developed by Science|Business for online and media distribution, and translate them into displays, activities and debates suitable for use in science museums, in local languages, to reach a wider set of the general public. Once the key six themes are set, Ecsite will collect the information from the Third Parties on their preferred topics and timing for the activities. Then the Ciênca Viva together with Ecsite will start developing activities for Third parties based on the topics they have chosen. Each science centre will cover two broad topics with a selection of activities. Three types of activities will be offered with two compulsory and one optional: • Dialogue activities inside science centres/museums. Museums will have the liberty to implement dialogue activities they are accustomed to running, or choose among a ‘menu of activities’ that will include discussion games such as PlayDecide and Science Cafés. PlayDecide games developed as part of the FP7 project FUND have since been widely used within the science communication community. The games are designed to facilitate the take-up of participatory methods, exchange experiences and knowledge. Through dialogue and listening to different points of view the participants realise the complexity of policymaking. PlayDecide is a proven method to stimulate debates and policy positions of a given group on controversial scientific topics. The results of the games played will be uploaded on the dedicated website (www.playdecide.eu) thus allowing for comparisons of views between different countries. Currently games on around 50 different topics have been created and many of them are translated into multiple languages. Topics such as nanotechnology, stem cells, climate change, healthy diet and lifestyle and many more already exist. ERC funded projects grouped around one of these topics could be presented in a discussion through these games. Once the themes of the project are decided, all available playdecide games will be screened, selected and adapted if needed, in the language of participating science museums. Science Cafes or Café Scientifiques are well-known and widely used formats. They are places where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafes, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context. Science Cafe is a forum for the discussion of important and interesting scientific issues. They are informal and accessible - much more so than a public lecture. Audiences consist of people who are interested in science but generally never have the opportunity to discuss their views and ask questions. Topics have included AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, climate change, Darwinism, evolution, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology. There are multiple variations of science cafes such as world café or a reverse science café. Depending on the topics, suitable adaptations of the formats will be made. The two activities above are given as an example and the formats may be adapted depending on the research topics chosen by the project. However their main objective – to discuss scientific issues in an accessible and informal way will remain. When available, ERC grantees will be invited to collaborate. • Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, parks, festivals, etc. (to be chosen by third parties

'Menu' of Activities for Science Centres and Museums (4)

Ciência Viva will take a lead on the design of activities that will be implemented by Ecsite’s third parties (Ecsite member museums) across Europe. Based on the stories (such as the sensory package), social events and ‘science experiences’ in science museums will be created. Videos, cartoons, augmented reality products and ERC grantees themselves become vehicles to tell ERC stories to a wider audience. In short, Ciência Viva will take the content packages developed by Science|Business for online and media distribution, and translate them into displays, activities and debates suitable for use in science museums, in local languages, to reach a wider set of the general public. Once the key six themes are set, Ecsite will collect the information from the Third Parties on their preferred topics and timing for the activities. Then the Ciênca Viva together with Ecsite will start developing activities for Third parties based on the topics they have chosen. Each science centre will cover two broad topics with a selection of activities. Three types of activities will be offered with two compulsory and one optional: • Dialogue activities inside science centres/museums. Museums will have the liberty to implement dialogue activities they are accustomed to running, or choose among a ‘menu of activities’ that will include discussion games such as PlayDecide and Science Cafés. PlayDecide games developed as part of the FP7 project FUND have since been widely used within the science communication community. The games are designed to facilitate the take-up of participatory methods, exchange experiences and knowledge. Through dialogue and listening to different points of view the participants realise the complexity of policymaking. PlayDecide is a proven method to stimulate debates and policy positions of a given group on controversial scientific topics. The results of the games played will be uploaded on the dedicated website (www.playdecide.eu) thus allowing for comparisons of views between different countries. Currently games on around 50 different topics have been created and many of them are translated into multiple languages. Topics such as nanotechnology, stem cells, climate change, healthy diet and lifestyle and many more already exist. ERC funded projects grouped around one of these topics could be presented in a discussion through these games. Once the themes of the project are decided, all available playdecide games will be screened, selected and adapted if needed, in the language of participating science museums. Science Cafes or Café Scientifiques are well-known and widely used formats. They are places where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafes, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context. Science Cafe is a forum for the discussion of important and interesting scientific issues. They are informal and accessible - much more so than a public lecture. Audiences consist of people who are interested in science but generally never have the opportunity to discuss their views and ask questions. Topics have included AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, climate change, Darwinism, evolution, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology. There are multiple variations of science cafes such as world café or a reverse science café. Depending on the topics, suitable adaptations of the formats will be made. The two activities above are given as an example and the formats may be adapted depending on the research topics chosen by the project. However their main objective – to discuss scientific issues in an accessible and informal way will remain. When available, ERC grantees will be invited to collaborate. • Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, parks, festivals, etc. (to be chosen by third parties

'Menu' of Activities for Science Centres and Museums

Leader: Ciência Viva Other participants: Ecsite Ciência Viva will take a lead on the design of activities that will be implemented by Ecsite’s third parties (Ecsite member museums) across Europe. Based on the stories (such as the sensory package), social events and ‘science experiences’ in science museums will be created. Videos, cartoons, augmented reality products and ERC grantees themselves become vehicles to tell ERC stories to a wider audience. In short, Ciência Viva will take the content packages developed by Science|Business for online and media distribution, and translate them into displays, activities and debates suitable for use in science museums, in local languages, to reach a wider set of the general public. Once the key six themes are set, Ecsite will collect the information from the Third Parties on their preferred topics and timing for the activities. Then the Ciênca Viva together with Ecsite will start developing activities for Third parties based on the topics they have chosen. Each science centre will cover two broad topics with a selection of activities. Three types of activities will be offered with two compulsory and one optional: • Dialogue activities inside science centres/museums. Museums will have the liberty to implement dialogue activities they are accustomed to running, or choose among a ‘menu of activities’ that will include discussion games such as PlayDecide and Science Cafés. PlayDecide games developed as part of the FP7 project FUND have since been widely used within the science communication community. The games are designed to facilitate the take-up of participatory methods, exchange experiences and knowledge. Through dialogue and listening to different points of view the participants realise the complexity of policymaking. PlayDecide is a proven method to stimulate debates and policy positions of a given group on controversial scientific topics. The results of the games played will be uploaded on the dedicated website (www.playdecide.eu) thus allowing for comparisons of views between different countries. Currently games on around 50 different topics have been created and many of them are translated into multiple languages. Topics such as nanotechnology, stem cells, climate change, healthy diet and lifestyle and many more already exist. ERC funded projects grouped around one of these topics could be presented in a discussion through these games. Once the themes of the project are decided, all available playdecide games will be screened, selected and adapted if needed, in the language of participating science museums. Science Cafes or Café Scientifiques are well-known and widely used formats. They are places where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafes, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context. Science Cafe is a forum for the discussion of important and interesting scientific issues. They are informal and accessible - much more so than a public lecture. Audiences consist of people who are interested in science but generally never have the opportunity to discuss their views and ask questions. Topics have included AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, climate change, Darwinism, evolution, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology. There are multiple variations of science cafes such as world café or a reverse science café. Depending on the topics, suitable adaptations of the formats will be made. The two activities above are given as an example and the formats may be adapted depending on the research topics chosen by the project. However their main objective – to discuss scientific issues in an accessible and informal way will remain. When available, ERC grantees will be invited to collaborate. • Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, pa

'Menu' of Activities for Science Centres and Museums (3)

Ciência Viva will take a lead on the design of activities that will be implemented by Ecsite’s third parties (Ecsite member museums) across Europe. Based on the stories (such as the sensory package), social events and ‘science experiences’ in science museums will be created. Videos, cartoons, augmented reality products and ERC grantees themselves become vehicles to tell ERC stories to a wider audience. In short, Ciência Viva will take the content packages developed by Science|Business for online and media distribution, and translate them into displays, activities and debates suitable for use in science museums, in local languages, to reach a wider set of the general public. Once the key six themes are set, Ecsite will collect the information from the Third Parties on their preferred topics and timing for the activities. Then the Ciênca Viva together with Ecsite will start developing activities for Third parties based on the topics they have chosen. Each science centre will cover two broad topics with a selection of activities. Three types of activities will be offered with two compulsory and one optional: • Dialogue activities inside science centres/museums. Museums will have the liberty to implement dialogue activities they are accustomed to running, or choose among a ‘menu of activities’ that will include discussion games such as PlayDecide and Science Cafés. PlayDecide games developed as part of the FP7 project FUND have since been widely used within the science communication community. The games are designed to facilitate the take-up of participatory methods, exchange experiences and knowledge. Through dialogue and listening to different points of view the participants realise the complexity of policymaking. PlayDecide is a proven method to stimulate debates and policy positions of a given group on controversial scientific topics. The results of the games played will be uploaded on the dedicated website (www.playdecide.eu) thus allowing for comparisons of views between different countries. Currently games on around 50 different topics have been created and many of them are translated into multiple languages. Topics such as nanotechnology, stem cells, climate change, healthy diet and lifestyle and many more already exist. ERC funded projects grouped around one of these topics could be presented in a discussion through these games. Once the themes of the project are decided, all available playdecide games will be screened, selected and adapted if needed, in the language of participating science museums. Science Cafes or Café Scientifiques are well-known and widely used formats. They are places where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafes, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context. Science Cafe is a forum for the discussion of important and interesting scientific issues. They are informal and accessible - much more so than a public lecture. Audiences consist of people who are interested in science but generally never have the opportunity to discuss their views and ask questions. Topics have included AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, climate change, Darwinism, evolution, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology. There are multiple variations of science cafes such as world café or a reverse science café. Depending on the topics, suitable adaptations of the formats will be made. The two activities above are given as an example and the formats may be adapted depending on the research topics chosen by the project. However their main objective – to discuss scientific issues in an accessible and informal way will remain. When available, ERC grantees will be invited to collaborate. • Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, parks, festivals, etc. (to be chosen by third parties

ERC Speaker Bureau

In addition to having ERC grantees present at relevant Science|Business events and those of our partners on a regular basis, the consortium will also act as a speaker bureau for the grantees we work with in a particular content cluster or those who may be interested in such opportunities. At any given time, there are a number of large and well-promoted science related conferences happening in Europe. Major conferences such as TEDx or ESOF are always looking for what the ERC already has, knowledgeable speakers working on cutting-edge topics. These are ideal platforms for the grantees to have public exposure and access to excellent networks. Members of the consortium are often consulted by event organisers on potential speakers. The ERC = Science² partners will consistently keep ERC ambassadors in mind and push their name forward when relevant. The consortium will also work towards creating speaking opportunities at a local level. Why not have one or two Polish grantees speak at the next TEDx Warsaw convention? University events also provide a great setting for grantees to connect with a large audience. Perhaps a Romanian researcher working at a host institution in France would be keen on going to few universities in Romania to speak with fellow researchers and students about their work and some of the options provided by the EU in terms of funding and partnerships. In short, we believe that one of the best ways for the ERC to communicate what it does, is to take every opportunity to put its research on the frontline.

'Menu' of Activities for Science Centres and Museums (6)

Ciência Viva will take a lead on the design of activities that will be implemented by Ecsite’s third parties (Ecsite member museums) across Europe. Based on the stories (such as the sensory package), social events and ‘science experiences’ in science museums will be created. Videos, cartoons, augmented reality products and ERC grantees themselves become vehicles to tell ERC stories to a wider audience. In short, Ciência Viva will take the content packages developed by Science|Business for online and media distribution, and translate them into displays, activities and debates suitable for use in science museums, in local languages, to reach a wider set of the general public. Once the key six themes are set, Ecsite will collect the information from the Third Parties on their preferred topics and timing for the activities. Then the Ciênca Viva together with Ecsite will start developing activities for Third parties based on the topics they have chosen. Each science centre will cover two broad topics with a selection of activities. Three types of activities will be offered with two compulsory and one optional: • Dialogue activities inside science centres/museums. Museums will have the liberty to implement dialogue activities they are accustomed to running, or choose among a ‘menu of activities’ that will include discussion games such as PlayDecide and Science Cafés. PlayDecide games developed as part of the FP7 project FUND have since been widely used within the science communication community. The games are designed to facilitate the take-up of participatory methods, exchange experiences and knowledge. Through dialogue and listening to different points of view the participants realise the complexity of policymaking. PlayDecide is a proven method to stimulate debates and policy positions of a given group on controversial scientific topics. The results of the games played will be uploaded on the dedicated website (www.playdecide.eu) thus allowing for comparisons of views between different countries. Currently games on around 50 different topics have been created and many of them are translated into multiple languages. Topics such as nanotechnology, stem cells, climate change, healthy diet and lifestyle and many more already exist. ERC funded projects grouped around one of these topics could be presented in a discussion through these games. Once the themes of the project are decided, all available playdecide games will be screened, selected and adapted if needed, in the language of participating science museums. Science Cafes or Café Scientifiques are well-known and widely used formats. They are places where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology. Meetings take place in cafes, bars, restaurants and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context. Science Cafe is a forum for the discussion of important and interesting scientific issues. They are informal and accessible - much more so than a public lecture. Audiences consist of people who are interested in science but generally never have the opportunity to discuss their views and ask questions. Topics have included AIDS, the Big Bang, biodiversity, cancer, climate change, Darwinism, evolution, genetically modified organisms and nanotechnology. There are multiple variations of science cafes such as world café or a reverse science café. Depending on the topics, suitable adaptations of the formats will be made. The two activities above are given as an example and the formats may be adapted depending on the research topics chosen by the project. However their main objective – to discuss scientific issues in an accessible and informal way will remain. When available, ERC grantees will be invited to collaborate. • Pop-up science stands will be set-up in public spaces such as shopping malls, city squares, parks, festivals, etc. (to be chosen by third parties

Datasets

MA results

Author(s): Alessandro Derzelle
Published in: Zenodo