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Articulatory-Acoustic Correlations in Coarticulatory Processes: a Cross-Language Investigation

Objective

The ACCOR working group aims to model articulatory-acoustic relationships in coarticulatory processes in seven European languages with a view to identifying which aspects of coarticulation are language-universal and which are language-specific. Methodological innovations include the combined use of electropalatography (EPG) and electromagnetic articulography (EMA) for parametricising tongue movements.

Use will be made of the EUR-ACCOR database, recorded during ACCOR I which is a major source of articulatory, aerodynamic and acoustic data on seven European languages.
A study is being made of articulatory acoustic correlations in coarticulatory processes in 7 European languages.
The Group's work is organized under 7 themes: modelling coarticulatory processes in different languages; lingual coarticulation in continuous speech; interarticulatory timing (coordination and acoustic consequences); lingual control parameters including combined uses of electropalatography (EPG) and electromagnetic articulography (EMA); database management system; use of articulatory features in speech technology; articulatory acoustic relations.

The Group organized a workshop and on Electromagnetic Articulography in Phonetic Research at the University of Muenich in April 1993. The second workshop involved Tongue Modelling and Data on Speech Production. In addition the Group has held internal meetings and participated in workshops involving other speech science consortia. A link has been established with the Human Capital and Mobility Network From Articulation to Perception: Representations in Speech and Hearing. Progress reports have been delivered at relevant major conferences and published in referred journals.
ACTIVITIES

The Group's work is organised under seven themes: modelling coarticulatory processes in different languages; lingual coarticulation in continuous speech; interarticulatory timing (co-ordination and acoustic consequences); lingual control parameters (including combined uses of EPG and EMA); database management system; use of articulatory features in speech technology; articulatory-acoustic relations.

POTENTIAL

In devising improved models of coarticulation, which is the principal source of variability in the speech signal, the Group will provide important input for improved speech recognition and synthesis systems.

Coordinator

Queen Margaret College
Address
Clerwood Terrace
EH12 8TS Edinburgh
United Kingdom

Participants (9)

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)
France
Address
Université De Provence 29 Avenue Robert Schumann
13621 Aix-en-provence
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)
Italy
Address
Via Overdan 10
35122 Padova
INST D'ESTUDIS CATALANS
Spain
Address
Carme, 47
08001 Barcelona
LUDWIG MAXIMILIANS UNIVERSITÄT MUNCHEN
Germany
Address
Schellingstraße 3
80799 München
Siemens AG
Germany
Address
Otto-hahn-ring 6
81739 München
UNIV. OF STOCKHOLM QZ UNIVERSITETS DATA
Sweden
Address

106 91 Stockholm
UNIVERSITY OF DUBLIN
Ireland
Address
Trinity College
Dublin 2
University of Geneva
Switzerland
Address
Av. Général-dufour 24
1211 Geneva
University of Reading
United Kingdom
Address
Earley Gate Whiteknights
RG6 2AR Reading