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CORDIS

Fano Photonics

Project description

Exploiting Fano resonances for the communication devices of the future

The energy consumed worldwide for data communication is steadily rising. Photonics technology operating at very high data rates with ultra-low energy consumption per bit could help meet our increasing energy demands sustainably. However, current device designs can't simply be scaled down for next-generation integrated devices. The EU-funded FANO project proposes a new class of devices exploiting Fano resonances to create a novel integrated mirror. Using this technology, it aims to demonstrate a laser with a much larger modulation bandwidth than current lasers, a nanolaser with a significantly smaller linewidth than existing nanocavity lasers, and a switch that operates at femtojoule energies and provides gain. These devices will enable high-speed optical interconnects and networks between and within chips.

Objective

A new class of devices exploiting Fano resonances and with important applications in information technology is suggested. Typically, the resonance of a system is described by a frequency and a lifetime, leading to a Lorentzian lineshape function. If the system instead involves interference between a discrete resonance and a continuum, a Fano lineshape appears with fundamentally different characteristics. Here, the Fano resonance is used to make a novel integrated mirror, enabling realization of Fano lasers, Fano switches and quantum Fano devices. These devices challenge well-accepted paradigms for photonic devices. The goals of the project are to demonstrate a laser with modulation bandwidth greatly exceeding all existing lasers; a nanolaser with linewidth three orders of magnitude smaller than existing nanocavity lasers; and a switch that operates at femtojoule energies and provides gain. Such devices are important for realizing high-speed optical interconnects and networks between and within chips. An increasing fraction of the global energy consumption is being used for data communication, and photonics operating at very high data rates with ultra-low energy per bit has been identified as a key technology to enable a sustainable growth of capacity demands. Existing device designs, however, cannot just be scaled down to reach the goals for next-generation integrated devices. The Fano mirror will also be used to demonstrate control at the single-photon level, which will enable high-quality on-demand single-photon sources, which are much demanded devices in photonic quantum technology. These devices all rely on the unique properties of the Fano mirror, which provides a new resource for ultrafast dynamic control, noise suppression and ultra-low energy operation. Using photonic crystal technology the project will achieve its goals in a concerted effort involving development of new theory, new nanofabrication techniques and advanced experiments.

Host institution

DANMARKS TEKNISKE UNIVERSITET
Net EU contribution
€ 2 500 000,00
Address
ANKER ENGELUNDS VEJ 101
2800 Kongens Lyngby
Denmark

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Region
Danmark Hovedstaden Københavns omegn
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Links
Total cost
€ 2 500 000,00

Beneficiaries (1)