Skip to main content

Role of N-kinase in regulating central nervous system regeneration

Objective

The proposed research will investigate the involvement of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase-3b (Mst-3b) in central nervous system (CNS) regeneration. It has previously been shown that the purine nucleoside inosine stimulates extensive axon outgrowth from certain types of neurons in culture and from injured brain pathways in vivo, leading to improved behavioural outcome.

Pilot experiments in the outgoing host institution suggest that the target of inosine's actions is the protein kinase Mst-3b, and that suppressing Mst-3b levels or functioning inhibits the generation of neurites in culture.

The main aims of this study are to investigate the role of Mst-3b in optic nerve regeneration in vivo and to investigate whether signalling through this kinase regulates the expression of a constellation of regeneration-associated genes. This project will use innovative, cutting-edge techniques such as adeno-associated virus transfection and microarray to alter/assess gene expression in vivo.

The aims of this fellowship are
- to advance our understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying regenerative success/failure in the CNS,
- training of the fellow Barbara Lorber to become an independent scientist leading her own research group in Europe, and
- to establish a, potentially long term, scientific collaboration between the outgoing host institution (Children's Hospital Boston (affiliated to Harvard Medical School), USA) and the return host institution (University of Birmingham, UK).

Call for proposal

FP6-2002-MOBILITY-6
See other projects for this call

Coordinator

THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM
Address
Edgbaston
Birmingham
United Kingdom

Participants (1)

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL BOSTON (HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL)
United States
Address
300 Longwood Avenue
Boston