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NEW CONCEPTS OF AUTOSTABLE MAGNETIC BEARINGS USING MAGNETICALLY MELTTEXTURED SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS

Objective



Performances already achieved for HTSC materials have stimulated the developments of new concepts for autostable magnetic bearings using configurations of permanent magnets and superconducting materials. Such concept eliminate the drawbacks of existing active magnetic bearing by increasing the reliability and reducing the complexity and costs of the control system.

The first objective of this project is to produce well-textured superconducting materials with strong pinning forces. It has been shown recently that, due to the magnetic anisotropy, crystallites in the melt align relative to an applied magnetic field. Solidification then yields texture materials with similar characteristics to those obtained from processes using a thermal gradient. Our concept is to improve these techniques and to develop a combination of both which should further increase the degree of texture. In addition, better control and shorter processing times will open the opportunity of a continuous production. For process optimization the prepared samples (cylinders and long plates), will be systematically characterized in terms of microstructure, degree of texture, magnetic and transport measurements.

The second objective is to study new hybrid configurations which take advantage of the strong repulsive forces between permanent magnets, (up to 6 Kg/cm²), and of the stabilizing effect due to the strong flux pinning of HTSC. By measuring the axial and radial stability, the stiffness and damping of prototype bearings, these configurations will be optimized. Insight will be provided to the performances that can be expected for these types of bearings.

Funding Scheme

CSC - Cost-sharing contracts

Coordinator

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS)
Address
25 Avenur Des Martyrs
38042 Grenoble
France

Participants (1)

Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe
Germany
Address
5,Weberstrasse
76133 Karlsruhe