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Researchers call for 'cold war' on climate change

Researchers at the science and technology forum at the World summit on sustainable development in Johannesburg have called for a new 'cold war' on climate change. Urgent action is needed to combat damage humans have done to the world's climate, atmosphere and biodiversity, t...

Researchers at the science and technology forum at the World summit on sustainable development in Johannesburg have called for a new 'cold war' on climate change. Urgent action is needed to combat damage humans have done to the world's climate, atmosphere and biodiversity, they said. The call comes after delegates reached agreement on ways to tackle the world's fisheries crisis. US researcher Berrien Moore said that political interests had dominated research agendas on climate change for too long. He added that the irreversible changes humans had wrought on the environment, including the felling of large swathes of forests, meant that policy makers could no longer ignore the dangers. 'The issues are there and we're not going to be able to duck them,' he said. The summit also produced a unique call for cooperation from the World business council for sustainable development (WBCSD) and Greenpeace who called for the creation of an international framework to combat climate change. 'Climate change is a global problem requiring a global framework,' said WBCSD President Bjorn Stigson, addressing over 300 representatives from press, government, business and non governmental organisations (NGOs). 'Business is waiting for governments to combat climate change by creating such a framework.' Although the WBCSD and Greenpeace have had their share of disagreements, they agreed to convene a dialogue to urge governments to act more forcefully to provide an international political framework that enables, stimulates and rewards innovation and implementation. They also called on others in both the public and private sectors to step up action to combat the climate change risks. 'Ten years ago we were fighting like cats and dogs,' said Rémi Parmentier, Political Director, Greenpeace International. 'We will continue to disagree, but as an advocacy NGO we are able to find common ground.'