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European Vocational Training Forum, Brussels

A European Vocational Training Forum, organized jointly by the Commission, the Belgian Presidency of the Council, the European Parliament and the Economic and Social Committee, will be held in Brussels (Espace Leopold) on 8-10 November 1993.

Better education and training are ...

8 November 1993 - 8 November 1993
Belgium

A European Vocational Training Forum, organized jointly by the Commission, the Belgian Presidency of the Council, the European Parliament and the Economic and Social Committee, will be held in Brussels (Espace Leopold) on 8-10 November 1993.

Better education and training are increasingly recognized as crucial for sustained economic and social development. The European Training Forum will provide the first opportunity for the key issues of the skills gap to be addressed at Community level.

Over 500 invited specialists together with representatives from government, vocational training, trade unions and employers organizations will examine the most effective means of meeting the qualifications and skills challenge in Europe.

The Forum takes place against the background of the Maastricht Treaty provisions (which call on the Community to implement a vocational training policy as well as contributing to the quality of education) and the White Paper on Economic Renewal, due to be presented to the Council in December. At the same time, a new generation of Community education, training and youth programmes is being put forward by Professor A. Ruberti, Commission Vice-President responsible for Research, Training and Youth.

Professor Ruberti will be among the opening speakers at the Forum, together with Egon Klepsch, President of the European Parliament, and Belgian ministers Michel Lebrun and Leona Detiege. The closing address on 10 November will be given by Commission President Jacques Delors.

Professor Ruberti has pointed out, in a pre-Forum press meeting, that 80% of the workforce and managers who will have to meet the challenges of the year 2000 have already left full-time education. It is clear that once-in-a-lifetime learning is no longer enough to keep up with the pace of change. Far-reaching adaptations to education and training systems may now be needed.

Appropriate qualifications are also vital for job-creating economic growth, competitiveness and innovation. Education and training are fundamental for social stability and the development of civic responsibility. Each Member State has much to learn from the different approaches and experiences of the others.

The first presentation of conclusions drawn from the Forum will take place at a press conference on 10 November.

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