Skip to main content

Role of mitochondria in mediating evolutionary rescue by anthropogenic pollutants in an invasive crab

Project description

Study investigates the mechanisms promoting green crab invasion in foreign ecosystems

Introduced either naturally or intentionally, invasive alien species are a main driver of biodiversity loss; they can adapt better to their new environment than natives after a certain time and then begin to colonise it. Recent research has shown that rapid evolution, which enables these species to quickly adapt and not go extinct due to maladaptation, accounts for their increased invasive capacity. Funded by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions programme, the MitoRescue project will extend the key outcomes of this research. Researchers will assume that mitochondria, being exquisitely sensitive to environmental stress and with a highly mutagenic DNA, are key organelles involved in rapid evolution. They will study how pollutants and increased temperatures affect an ancestral and an invasive population of the European green crab, an extremely prolific invader.

Coordinator

CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS
Net EU contribution
€ 298 734,72
Address
Rue Michel Ange 3
75794 Paris
France

See on map

Region
Ile-de-France Ile-de-France Paris
Activity type
Research Organisations
Other funding
No data

Partners (1)

GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY
Australia
Net EU contribution
No data
Address
Kessels Road Nathan
4111 Brisbane

See on map

Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Other funding
No data