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Neutrinos at High Energies: Disentangling Galactic and Extra-galactic components

Project description

Exploring the origin of high-energy cosmic neutrinos

In 2013, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in the South Pole measured 28 neutrinos that likely originated outside the Solar System. The discovery represents the dawn of neutrino astronomy that can definitively shed light on the sources of high-energy cosmic rays and their production mechanisms. A multi-messenger approach is crucial for identifying whether neutrino detections stem from an extra-galactic origin or the presence of a galactic component. Funded under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions programme, the nuHEDGE project will compare the singe-point sources available in existing gamma-ray catalogues with IceCube data, focusing on their spatial, timing and energy distribution. Based on the sensitivity of gamma-ray experiments, including the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array project, researchers could verify the origin of the IceCube events.

Objective

In 2013 the IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory has received the Physics World award for the Breakthrough of the
Year for the first observations of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. The discovery, indeed, represents the birth of a new
research field, the neutrino astronomy, that can definitively shed light on the sources of high-energy cosmic-rays and on the
mechanisms through which they are produced. The origin of all of the detected neutrinos is still to be correctly identified.
Just recently evidence for emission from the direction of the blazar TXS 0506+056 has been reported. The most
important point to understand is if the neutrino events are all of extra-galactic origin or a galactic component is present, and
which are the specific characteristics, like size of the acceleration region and magnetic field, of the possible sources. To
achieve this goal a multi-messenger approach is necessary. In particular, it is important to compare the single point sources
available in the current gamma-ray catalogues with the IceCube data, considering their spatial, timing and energy
distribution. After identifying specific plausible candidates for the IceCube events, it is possible to consider the sensitivity of
gamma-ray experiments, like the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the planned Cherenkov Telescope Array
Project, to verify the origin of the IceCube events. For the final correct identification of the IceCube neutrinos, the detection of
the events from different experiments will be fundamental. In this regard, the estimation of the prospects for ANTARES, for
the possible extension of IceCube and for the planned cubic kilometre neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere,
KM3NeT, is mandatory.

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Coordinator

CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE CNRS
Net EU contribution
€ 184 707,84
Address
Rue michel ange 3
75794 Paris
France

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Region
Ile-de-France Ile-de-France Paris
Activity type
Research Organisations
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Other funding
€ 0,00