Skip to main content

Differential DOM-cycling through Microbes and Sponges

Project description

Role of microbes and sponges in microbialisation of reefs

Nutrient pollution and overfishing represent a major threat for coral reefs as they facilitate community shifts from reef-building corals to algae, increasing production of algal-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM). Since DOM cannot be consumed by most reef animals, it is transformed by microbes and sponges into particles and re-enters the food web. These recycling processes termed ‘microbial and sponge loops’ are considered as key ecosystem adaptations for reefs. However, increased algal-DOM and sponges on degraded reefs have been associated with the ‘microbialisation of reefs’. The EU-funded DDMS project intends to define whether planktonic microbes and sponges compete over DOM and describe the composition of different DOM types in past, present and future projection of available DOM.

Coordinator

UNIVERSITEIT VAN AMSTERDAM
Net EU contribution
€ 253 052,16
Address
Spui 21
1012WX Amsterdam
Netherlands

See on map

Region
West-Nederland Noord-Holland Groot-Amsterdam
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Non-EU contribution
€ 0,00

Partners (1)

Partner

Partner organisations contribute to the implementation of the action, but do not sign the Grant Agreement.

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII
United States
Net EU contribution
€ 0,00
Address
2440 Campus Road, Box 368
96822-2234 Honolulu Hi

See on map

Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Non-EU contribution
€ 165 265,92