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SHRIMP FARMING AND THE ENVIRONMENT : AVOIDANCE OF LONG TERM DETRIMENTAL EFFECTS

Objective



This joint collaboration is designed to find solutions to major problems relating to shrimp aquaculture. Shrimp farming has been a major source of export earnings for many tropical countries. of the species most suitable for culture, breeding in captivity is not usually possible without use of eyestalk ablation. This process leads to less successful breeding and lowered survival. This difficulty with breeding from pond reared shrimp creates extreme fishery pressure on mature, wild caught broodstock which results in very high prices being realised for the animals and an established and largely illegal international trade in them. Lack of broodstock can be foreseen to be a major obstacle to the continuing success of shrimp farming. Methods that would allow breeding to take place readily from farm bred stocks, thus closing the life cycle, would help both the fishery and the shrimp farming industry. It would also help avoid the spread of disease by enabling breeding from disease-free stock and also the problem caused by exotic introductions. The project aims to find such methods. Another problem being encountered in many parts of the world is loss of production related to environmental degradation. Many shrimp disease problems are stress-related and much of this stress could result either from the activities of shrimp farmers, the use of chemicals in rice cultivation (pesticides used for the control of crabs are particularly implicated) or industrial pollution. There is much debate as to who or what is responsible for this loss in production but until it is known what the likely effects of different potential pollutants might be, there is little to be gained from such debate. Pesticides from rice farming and antibiotic residues from shrimp farming will be measured; also levels of heavy metals will be monitored. The project on environmental degradation in the mangrove areas which threatens amongst other things, the mangrove crab. This is a valuable species in its own right and has potential as an aquaculture or ranching product. The project proposes to utilise the expertise built un with previous projects on Macrobrachium to study the essential requirements for the culture of this species

Funding Scheme

CSC - Cost-sharing contracts

Coordinator

UNIVERSITY OF STIRLING
Address

FK9 4LA Stirling
United Kingdom

Participants (2)

Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas " Abel Salazar "
Portugal
Address

4000 Porto
University Pertanian Malaysia
Malaysia
Address

Serdang Selangor