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Ironing out Fe homeostasis and ferroproteins metallation in symbiotic Rhizobia

Project description

Handling of iron in nitrogen-fixing endosymbiotic bacteria

Rhizobia-legume symbiosis is the main route for sustainable nitrogen to contribute to soil fertility. During symbiosis, legumes develop nodules hosting endosymbiotic bacteria expressing nitrogenase, a unique iron and molibdenum metalloenzyme that transforms atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia that is utilised by plants. The EU-funded IronFeRhizo project will combine biochemical and molecular biology techniques to determine how much iron is required by nitrogen-fixing bacteria, which genes are required in its transport into the cell, and how much is used to metallate the nitrogenase and other metalloproteins. The techniques developed will facilitate research into mineral nutrition in other soil bacteria, how cells partition an element among different metalloproteins, and how iron homeostasis can help us optimise nitrogen fixation in rhizobia.

Coordinator

THE CHANCELLOR, MASTERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
Net EU contribution
€ 224 933,76
Address
Wellington Square University Offices
OX1 2JD Oxford
United Kingdom

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Region
South East (England) Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Oxfordshire
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Non-EU contribution
€ 0,00