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Tidal marshes: bio-geomorphic self-organization and its implications for resilience to sea level rise and changing sediment supply

Project description

New fundamental knowledge on landscape self-organisation

Intertidal landscapes are compound environments that provide valuable ecosystem services. However, the rising sea level and changing sediment supply represent a growing threat. Past research suggests that bio-geomorphic self-organisation processes play a substantial role in channel network formation and evolution. The EU-funded TIGER project will generate new fundamental knowledge on landscape self-organisation by combining remote sensing, field measurements and numerical simulations. The project will investigate the impact of plant species’ features on bio-geomorphic self-organisation of intertidal landscapes. TIGER relies on the hypothesis that different plant species characteristics lead to the self-organisation of different channel network patterns and that self-organised landscape structures determine the efficiency of sediment distribution to the intertidal floodplain.

Coordinator

UNIVERSITEIT ANTWERPEN
Net EU contribution
€ 258 530,40
Address
Prinsstraat 13
2000 Antwerpen
Belgium

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Region
Vlaams Gewest Prov. Antwerpen Arr. Antwerpen
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Other funding
€ 258 530,40

Partners (1)

Partner

Partner organisations contribute to the implementation of the action, but do not sign the Grant Agreement.

THE TRUSTEES OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY
United States
Net EU contribution
€ 0,00
Address
Commonwealth Avenue 881
02215 Boston Ma

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Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
Other funding
€ 0,00