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CORDIS

Colonization resistance: training and research towards microbiome derived solutions to foodborne disease

Project description

Understanding how the gut microbiota fights foodborne pathogens

Foodborne and waterborne diseases remain a global public health challenge, causing 23 million illnesses in the European region and 5 000 deaths per year. Focusing on the medical side of prevention, the EU-funded COL_RES project will form a network to study the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota protects against serious Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, Citrobacter, Campylobacter and other foodborne pathogens. This will help researchers identify next-generation probiotics that can protect against multiple infectious agents. It will also identify overlapping mechanisms by which members of the gut microbiota provide a barrier to infection through the phenomenon of colonisation resistance. By forging intersectoral industry-academia secondments, the network will provide training for early stage researchers.

Objective

The COL_RES network comprises a world-leading group of investigators that will investigate the mechanisms by which the gut microbiota protects against serious foodborne pathogens (Salmonella, E. coli, Listeria, Citrobacter and Campylobacter) and lead to the identification of next generation probiotics that can protect against multiple infectious agents. Through intersectoral industry-academia secondments the network will provide state-of-the-art training for early stage researchers (ESR) preparing them for problem solving and entrepreneurial roles in industry and society and underpinning cutting-edge research in infectious disease in the EU. Food and water borne diseases cause 23 million illnesses in the European region with 5000 deaths per annum and represent an increasing challenge to the health of the EU and global population. Through studying different pathogens using shared approaches the COL_RES network will undertake a network-wide approach to identify overlapping mechanisms by which members of the gut microbiota provide a barrier to infection through the phenomenon of Colonization Resistance. The work will utilise a systems-based approach by exploiting existing research models at world-leading laboratories combined with phageomics, metabolomics and bioinformatics to generate multi-omics data that will uncover both pathogen-specific and shared mechanisms by which the gut microbiota protects against foodborne pathogens. The work will inform the selection and testing of specific next-generation probiotic candidates that can protect against foodborne infections, with potential for further development by our industry partners. Thus, the network will enhance training through world-leading research via cross-sectoral industry secondments in an actively entrepreneurial environment.

Coordinator

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK - NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, CORK
Net EU contribution
€ 824 052,96
Address
WESTERN ROAD
T12 YN60 Cork
Ireland

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Region
Ireland Southern South-East
Activity type
Higher or Secondary Education Establishments
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Total cost
€ 824 052,96

Participants (5)