Skip to main content

Article Category

News

Article available in the folowing languages:

Statistics in focus: Human resources in high technology in Europe

The Statistical Office of the European Commission (EUROSTAT) has published the latest in its series of bulletins on "Statistics in Focus: Research and development in the EU". The latest issue, the first of 1998, looks at human resources in high technology, following the public...

The Statistical Office of the European Commission (EUROSTAT) has published the latest in its series of bulletins on "Statistics in Focus: Research and development in the EU". The latest issue, the first of 1998, looks at human resources in high technology, following the publication last year of a bulletin on human resources in science and technology. The object is to examine the regional distribution of employment in high technology sectors, and also the correlation between the regions with the highest levels of employment in high technology sectors and other R&D indicators such as R&D personnel and expenditure. High technology sectors are considered as those sectors with a high R&D intensity, defined as the ratio of R&D expenditure to GDP. However, it is noted that the level of technological classifications used could be improved to increase the precision of the study. Data from the Community Labour Force Survey for 1995 was used for the study. The main finding of this research was that the number of persons employed in high technology sectors throughout the EU in 1995 was estimated to be over 7.2% of the total number of persons in employment. Over three-quarters of those employed in high technology are found in the four largest EU countries - Germany, France, Italy and the UK. The study concentrated exclusively on the manufacturing sectors which are considered to be R&D intensive. It is, however, acknowledged in the study that certain aspects of the services sector such as the computer industry and research and development could also be included. The study concludes that the monitoring of employment in high technology sectors provides additional information about the scientific and technological aspects of society that are not evidenced when other indicators are used. In particular, it demonstrates that analysing employment in high technology industries provides different results from the more traditional analysis of personnel involved in R&D activities. The top ten European regions in terms of high technology employment, ranging from 9.9% to 17.3% of total employment, include six German regions, two in Northern Italy, Eastern France and the West Midlands of England.

Related articles