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More frequencies needed for Galileo, says de Palacio

Addressing delegates at the World radiocommunications conference (WRC 2000) in Istanbul, the vice president of the European Commission Ms Loyola de Palacio, asked for participants' support for the European Galileo satellite navigation programme. The Commissioner, who is also ...

Addressing delegates at the World radiocommunications conference (WRC 2000) in Istanbul, the vice president of the European Commission Ms Loyola de Palacio, asked for participants' support for the European Galileo satellite navigation programme. The Commissioner, who is also responsible for transport and energy, pointed out that the European Union is open to cooperation with all other parties in order to allow an independent and complementary development of Galileo. 'The recent agreement between the European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administrations (CEPT) and Asia Pacific Telecommunity (APT) shows how important international cooperation is in this field' said the Commissioner. Less than a year ago, the European Union decided to develop a next generation satellite-based navigation and precision timing system with a European-developed, state-of-the art design that would set the industry standard for the 21st century. It has already developed EGNOS, a system which augments existing GPS signals and that is accurate enough to rely on for guiding civil aircraft in to land. 'This new technology to be confirmed in Galileo will revolutionise our transport systems, increase safety, improve efficiency, minimise transport infrastructure and hardware investment costs, and help reorganise frequencies allocations,' says the Commission. The system is also hoped to benefit other areas such as farming, the emergency services and safety at sea. The Commission is now confident the international community - represented by delegates at WRC 2000 - will welcome EU offers for cooperation and will support the allocation of frequencies to Galileo.