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Metal-Organic Research for Semiconductor Epitaxy

Objective

The MORSE project aims to develop novel non-toxic precursors and to test their quality by MOVPE and CBE.
The overall project objectives are to: develop new, better suited group III and V precursors for metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) growth applications. The precursor studies aim to identify new source materials which provide both improved operational characteristics (primarily vapour pressure, stability and toxicity) and also reduced unintentional impurity uptake in the resulting epitaxial layers; and to appraise the new CBE technique for the growth of advanced III-V demonstrator devices such as gallium arsenide/gallium aluminium arsenide and gallium arsenide/gallium indium phosphide heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT) in order to allow direct comparison with corresponding devices produced using the present generation molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and MOVPE growth processes. Alternative new liquid organic precursors have been synthesized and characterized. Studies on biphosphinoethane (BPE) or tertiary butyl phosphine (TBP) and tertiary butyl arsine (TBAs) had led to the conclusion that state of the art, highly uniform multiple quantum well (MQW) laser structures can be grown using these much safer precursors.
Diethyl-aluminium-hydride-trimethylamine (DEAlH-NMe3) appears to be the best suited new aluminium precursor, with higher vapour pressure than TEAL (x 5), and low carbon and oxygen contamination when tested in CBE.
Studies on indium prescursors concentrated on dimethylaminopropy-dimethyl-indium (DADI). This compound is a promising candidated, being liquid at room temperature and having a high vapour pressure comparable to that of TEIn. High quality indium phosphide has been reproducibly grown with best low temperature mobilities of u(77 k) greater than 110000 cm{2} V{-1} s{-1}.
Preliminary experiments have been conducted on the growth of gallium indium phosphide with TBP. As observed in the case of indium phosphide, carbon concentrations are strongly reduced by using TBP instead of phosphide. No significant differ ence is noted for the sulphur, silicon and oxygen levels.
High n-type doping of CBE gallium arsenide and gallium indium phosphide has been successfully achieved using concentrated sources of disilane and hydrogen sulphide. Thanks to its higher incorporation efficiency with lower memory effect, hydrogen sulphide preferred to disilane as n-type dopant for both gallium arsenide and gallium indium phosphide. An ultra-high level gallium arsenide p-type doping capability has also been established using the TMGa precursor for specific application to the base region of the HBT device.
The overall objectives were to:

- develop new, better suited group III and V precursors for MOVPE (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy) and CBE (chemical beam epitaxy) growth applications. The precursor studies aim to identify new source materials which provide both improved operational characteristics (primarily vapour pressure, stability and toxicity) and also reduced unintentional impurity uptake in the resulting epitaxial layers.
- appraise the new CBE technique for the growth of advanced III-V demonstrator devices such as GaAs/GaAlAs and GaAs/GaInP HBT, in order to allow direct comparison with corresponding devices produced using the present-generation MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) and MOVPE growth processes.

Coordinator

Thomson CSF
Address
Domaine De Corbeville
91404 Orsay
France

Participants (9)

Centre National d'Études des Télécommunications (CNET)
France
Address
38-40 Rue Du Général Leclerc
92131 Issy-les-moulineaux
Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)
Italy
Address
Corso Stati Uniti 4
35020 Padova
Defence Research Agency (DRA)
United Kingdom
Address
St Andrews Road
WR14 3PS Malvern
FORTH RESEARCH CENTER OF CRETE
Greece
Address
Madzapetaki, 21, 1385
71110 Heraklion
Isa Riber
France
Address
133-137 Boulevard National
92503 Rueil-malmaison
Metaleurop PREUSSAG Pure Metals
Germany
Address
Am Bahnhof 4
38685 Langelsheim
Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule Aachen (RWTH)
Germany
Address
Sommerfeldstraße 24
52074 Aachen
SMI ORGANOMETALLIC DIVISION
France
Address
2 Rue Sainte Julia
13002 Marseille
UNIVERSITAET STUTTGART
Germany
Address
Pfaffenwaldring 57
70550 Stuttgart