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Nucleolar regulation of longevity

Project description

'Little nuclei' confirm that bigger is not always better

The nucleolus, or little nucleus inside the cell's nucleus, was first formally described in the 1830s. It took more than a century for scientists to discover that it is the site of ribosome production, and almost another half-century to realise it has other equally far-reaching roles. It is the site of signal recognition particle synthesis, a regulatory zone for cell-cycle progression mediators and other functions yet to be discovered. The EU-funded NUAGE project has found a relationship between nucleolar size and longevity, with small nucleoli corresponding to longer life in diverse species. Smaller is better for human metabolism as well. High-tech methods in several animal models could elucidate conserved molecular mechanisms with implications for metabolic health and lifespan.

Host institution

MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV
Net EU contribution
€ 2 500 000,00
Address
Hofgartenstrasse 8
80539 Munchen
Germany

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Region
Bayern Oberbayern München, Kreisfreie Stadt
Activity type
Research Organisations
Other funding
€ 2 500 000,00

Beneficiaries (1)

MAX-PLANCK-GESELLSCHAFT ZUR FORDERUNG DER WISSENSCHAFTEN EV
Germany
Net EU contribution
€ 2 500 000,00
Address
Hofgartenstrasse 8
80539 Munchen

See on map

Region
Bayern Oberbayern München, Kreisfreie Stadt
Activity type
Research Organisations
Other funding
€ 2 500 000,00