CORDIS
EU research results

CORDIS

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Hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography and X-ray Computed Tomography system and method

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 201792

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 March 2008

  • End date

    31 August 2012

Funded under:

FP7-HEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 5 839 676

  • EU contribution

    € 4 512 141

Coordinated by:

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MUENCHEN DEUTSCHES FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM FUER GESUNDHEIT UND UMWELT GMBH

English EN

New imaging technique gives a clearer picture

Accurate diagnosis is one issue; appropriate therapy is another. Together, they are the key to eradication of many diseases. With EU funding, researchers have pioneered a hybrid imaging technique to achieve both ambitious objectives.

Health

Diagnosis and analysis of processes in abnormal tissue have come on in leaps and bounds with techniques like fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). As the process can detect the presence of fluorescent chemicals in cells which vary according to conditions, many changes associated with disease at cell and sub-cell level in abnormal tissue can be identified. Previous methods depended on photographic methods to assess the luminescence of tissues. However, this does not allow for depth of tissue and the fact that light that does not travel in straight lines from some cells. Errors in diagnosis are possible and researchers turned to methods based on photons, the basic particles that make up light, one being FMT. Unfortunately, even FMT has a few drawbacks. These include limited resolution between objects and lack of anatomical information. European scientists have therefore drawn upon another imaging technique to fill in the gaps. Researchers with the appropriate acronym, project FMTXCT, have come up with a hybrid between fluorescence imaging and computer tomography (CT). A type of X-ray technique, CT makes images out of many cross-sectional X-ray beams but is non-invasive and produces two and three dimensional images. The XCT-based correction improves FMT performance in a radical way. It allows flexibility in targeting the physiology and function of molecules without the use of radioactive materials. Most labs have access to fluorescent reporting but use of radionuclides means extra cost – the provision of a particle accelerator, for example - and handling difficulties associated with radioactive materials. The main focus of the project research is preclinical imaging for breast cancer. As well as diagnosis, FMT-XCT can be used for gauging therapy response. Trials have also been done on the response of cells under conditions of low oxygen levels. As such, it is important in many conditions such as lung cancer, asthma and heart failure. Project researchers have already developed the functional prototype and associated software. It seems the sky is the limit for diagnostic and therapeutic applications for a machine of this resolution and accuracy. Altogether, early, accurate diagnosis and more effective treatment give a rosier prognosis for the patient and money spent more wisely for health authorities.

Project information

Grant agreement ID: 201792

Status

Closed project

  • Start date

    1 March 2008

  • End date

    31 August 2012

Funded under:

FP7-HEALTH

  • Overall budget:

    € 5 839 676

  • EU contribution

    € 4 512 141

Coordinated by:

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MUENCHEN DEUTSCHES FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM FUER GESUNDHEIT UND UMWELT GMBH

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